painting wood using oil-based paint

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On Sunday, August 14, 2016 at 10:34:50 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

I wasn't referring to the product description, I was referring to the application instructions that are on the can. If they require a primer to put it over oil based product, that's where they would say so. This isn't an unusual thing, it's fairly common and it would be pretty dumb for BM to not state it, if it's required, will cause failure, etc.

I would agree with that, but it wasn't me that said that primer is a must when going over oil based. If it's typical, weathered paint that is otherwise sound, then you can go over it with latex. If it's chalky or has other problems, then that is an issue with any kind of base.

How many paint cans have you seen of solid stain topcoat product or similar, where in the application instructions they only address going over bare wood? The vast majority of the product is used going over previously painted surfaces and again, in the application instructions BM doesn't have any restriction on using it over existing oil based paint.
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On 08/14/2016 9:52 AM, trader_4 wrote: ...

Actually, I've _never_ looked specifically at a can of solid stain topcoat as never have (and never will) had any use for the product. :)
But, I'll still bet somewhere in the instructions for each and every topcoat product there's the caveat that covers the issue regarding the specifics on prep and existing surfaces even if it's in the (maybe very) fine print.
I'm certain they didn't put the phrase "most surfaces" in the description just to clutter up and take up space... :)
The craze of "self-priming" paint is a relatively new phenomenon; it'll be interesting to see if it actually lasts. It certainly saves time for the professional which is the driving force; I think it's too early to tell whether the product in general raises more issues than the convenience it provides.
$0.02, imo, ymmv, etc., etc., etc., ... ;)
--



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On Sunday, August 14, 2016 at 9:30:48 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

I was responding to nothing more than these statements:
"...and you only use primer on bare wood"
and
"You'd use it on new wood or spots that have been scraped/sanded bare"
Sitting way out here on the ole interweb that certainly sounds like you are discussing the use of primer in general, not related to any specific product. Taken as written, they are not true.
How else could someone take "and you only use primer on bare wood"?
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On Sunday, August 14, 2016 at 11:25:10 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Look, I was not addressing every possible painting project, only hers with the specifics given. She's painting wood siding that has oil based product on it now. What I said is true for what she is doing.
Conveniently forgetting that you posted this: Absolutely not true.
"Primer is required when you want to use Latex over Oil"
She's painting wood siding that has oil based product on it now. Read the instructions for the BM product. IT says nothing about requiring a primer when using it over existing product. If BM had the requirement you claimed exists FOR HER PROJECT, then it's very strange that it's not on the application instructions. Is BM so stupid they can't tell people how to apply their own product correctly?
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On Sunday, August 14, 2016 at 12:45:28 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

No argument, except that there is no way for anyone to know that you were only addressing her specific situation. As soon as you used the words "No, and" as in "...and you only use primer on bare wood" you have made what appears to be a general statement regarding primer, not a statement specific to her situation. The first part ("No") answered her question; everything after the comma could easily be taken as a general statement as to when primer is used.
If someone who nothing about painting read those words, the only conclusion they could come to is exactly what you said: "and you only use primer on bare wood."

What would you conveniently forget something that is absolutely accurate?

Once again, I'm not talking about her project, I'm talking about the words you used. If you were addressing her specific project, then it should have been worded so as not to appear as a general statement regarding the use of primer.
1) Can I use Oil primer alone? Does that primer has color?
No, unless you have bare wood or areas that have been sanded down to bare wood. Those areas should be primed.
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On Sunday, August 14, 2016 at 6:58:06 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Are you for real? I made my comment in a reply to Leza's question, my response came right after each question she specifically asked. Anyone can see that I was replying to the question she asked about her specific situation. I clearly was not giving advice to the whole world, in every painting application, which of course can't be done.

I see, so now whenever I answer a question, I have to frame it for all possible readers, with all possible painting products, not answer the one question for the situation stated.

I'm not forgetting what you posted, YOU are. You posted "Primer is required when you want to use latex over oil. That is BS and worse, it's the wrong answer to her question of what she wants to do. If her wood siding is in good shape, has a couple coats of oil based product on it, she can go over it with BM Arborcoat solid stain. BM obviously thinks so, they don't say primer is needed in the application instructions.

I see, you're here posting in a thread about her question and you just made a blanket statement that primer has to be used when going from oil to latex, but it's not directed at her? WTF? Do you think we're all stupid?
If you were addressing her specific project, then it should have

I put my replies right after her specific questions. Any reasonable person can easily see that I was replying to her and not some guy painting a steel boat in Botswana.
I responded to her question and got it right. You want to make the case that I have to address every possible painting situation in my answer. YOU on the other hand, gave her an answer which is wrong for her situation and also wrong for most people who have oil based paint and want to move to latex. Listening to you, she'd be doing 2x the work. Who should she believe? You or BM?
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trader_4 wrote:

Not really - If the old oil paint in question has a gloss, then you definitely want to sand & prime it before using latex. If it's flat oil (paint or stain), no need to prime first.
G.
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On Monday, August 15, 2016 at 9:14:38 AM UTC-4, Gary wrote:

Well then to flat out state "primer is required when you want to use latex over oil" is BS and the wrong answer. And from the description of the actual situation, the question asked, she's painting house siding. You see many cases of house siding being painted in gloss?
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"Gary" wrote: | > | > You posted "Primer is | > required when you want to use latex over oil. That is BS... | | Not really - | If the old oil paint in question has a gloss, then you definitely want | to sand & prime it before using latex. If it's flat oil (paint or | stain), no need to prime first. |
I wouldn't prime it. Fortunately, most exterior oil paint will long since have lost its gloss, anyway. Especially on a fence. I just wash it with hot water and TSP. Primer is meant to soak in and provide a base for paint to adhere to. It's not going to stick better than the finish paint. And non-oil, quick-dry primers that don't soak in are even worse, perpetrated by painters who don't want to wait for coats to dry. So oil primer for bare spots and maybe for badly broken up paint that isn't peeling. That would be true with either latex/acrylic or oil. Oil finish paint should not go over bare wood.
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On Monday, August 15, 2016 at 8:06:01 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

We continue to come at this from 2 completely opposite directions, so let's just move on.
I wish Leza luck with her project and I hope your advice is taken and used to her best advantage.
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On 08/13/2016 03:41 PM, leza wang wrote:

Boat paint? Tractor/farm implement paint? Shirley the "authorities" wouldn't expect latex crap to hold up in those applications?
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