painting "plytanium dryply" plywood?


I'm thinking of using G-P "Plytanium Dryply" as roof sheathing. This roof has an 'open' overhang, where the underside of the sheathing is exposed. The plywood would be installed with the coated (red) side down. My question is whether this will take (and hold) paint.
Thanks, G
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Nope. Per G-P e-mail, "DryPly cannot be painted as the water repellant waxy emulsion will not allow paint to adhere to the board properly."
Oh well.
G
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G-
I would suggest using T&G 1x6's where sheathing would be exposed.
Since the stuff is touted as water resistant.....painting might be a problem.
cheers Bob
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fftt wrote:

I like this idea a lot. Do the bottom X feet of the roof in real wood (but I would go 5/4, even if I had to notch the rafter tails to make the roof lay flat), since the bottom can breathe, and then do the attic part in something cheap and moisture-resistant. Back in the 60s and early 70s, my old man did a lot of California-style flying wing houses with 2x T&G roof decking that was also the inside ceiling, with fiber insulation above under a built-up roof, but that wouldn't fly with the heating costs today. You'd have to do a foot thick roof system with layers of foam, like a commercial building.
-- aem sends...
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