painting plywood on walls of bathroom

Hi
My bathroom walls are going to be finished with either tiles on marine ply or painted plaster on "Green" plasterboard. Now there is a tricky space beh ind the towel rail that protrudes too far. I can't cut the brackets support ing the rail much because the towel won't fit behind. My idea is to replace the 2cm ply behind the rad with 1cm thick ply and paint it a similar colou r to the tiles. Without the tiles I will save 2cm thickness of wall. Where the towel rail is located in the bathroom, this thickness is crucial.
I have a few descriptions online that painted ply has been used successfull y on kitchen floors. Now if I prime, undercoat twice, paint, then seal twic e with matt polyurethane varnish (I am thinking of giving the treatment you would to the hull of a wooden boat !) will mean the rad will receed a vita l 2cm and mostof the painted wall will be hidden behind the towel rad anyw ay.
Could this work? (please say yes). Better than that, has anyone experience of painted plywood floors in kitchens or bathrooms?
Thanks
Clive
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On 11/04/16 20:49, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Done a lot of painted mdf. Looks just like plaster.
Ply? Normally skim it or tile it. But if you use acrylic primer on it and rub it down to get rid of the grain it should take emulsion ok
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On Monday, 11 April 2016 20:49:27 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

y or painted plaster on "Green" plasterboard. Now there is a tricky space b ehind the towel rail that protrudes too far. I can't cut the brackets suppo rting the rail much because the towel won't fit behind. My idea is to repla ce the 2cm ply behind the rad with 1cm thick ply and paint it a similar col our to the tiles. Without the tiles I will save 2cm thickness of wall. Wher e the towel rail is located in the bathroom, this thickness is crucial.

lly on kitchen floors. Now if I prime, undercoat twice, paint, then seal tw ice with matt polyurethane varnish (I am thinking of giving the treatment y ou would to the hull of a wooden boat !) will mean the rad will receed a vi tal 2cm and mostof the painted wall will be hidden behind the towel rad an yway.

e of painted plywood floors in kitchens or bathrooms?

you presumably know that the type of ply you get is critical in a wet locat ion.
NT
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On 4/11/2016 9:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Behind the rad doesn't sound like a wet location to me. I would say that prime, undercoat, and gloss would be fine. No need for polyurethane. I'd have thought emulsion would last pretty well too.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd expect some movement with humidity change.
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On 11/04/16 23:03, Capitol wrote:

a little. Much less than with wood. about 0.1% max
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

My roof ply bent.
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These days wooden boats are given an epoxy coating, and the varnishes are two pot. This may be overkill for you.
Andy
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