Ozone Generator -vs- Cat Urine Spray?

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N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc) wrote:

Thanks for the input Dave... It would only be a minor addition to his product lines. (more of an area of personal interest - water treatment.) As far as getting sued - He wouldn't violate valid patents. (or invalid ones with out a right to practice opinion) He has a very solid background in diffuser technology ... .and some interesting results and stories. I'm pretty sure I don't have all the details right ;-). - I shouldn't relay second hand information, but It sounded like an area of interest for both you and my friend. If you're interested - I can give you contact information - it sounds like you two might have a pretty interesting discussion. (he loves technical banter)
Gregg

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Dear Gregg:
...

It was not "patent" or "opinion" that would get him sued, IMO. It was violation of physical law, and wild claims. Customers are getting wise.

That's OK. I am not in the busniess of specifying diffuser systems. But thank you.
David A. Smith
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wrote:

O3 is a lung irritant. Every Gov regulating agency has ppm per hour limits for exposure for o3. Ozone Generators easily surpass the max saftey limits. Read up on o3 before you leap. Start with the EPA and Google Ozones harmfull effects - o3 exposure limits. True Generators can easily overexpose a room with ozone.High o3 fries lungs permanently..
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On Apr 9, 6:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com.au wrote:

I was involved in some experiments years ago with removing the odor of cigarettes from 'no smoking' rooms in hotels. Seems that maintaining 10 ppm ozone for a few hours got rid of most odors without a lot of damage to fabrics and so on. I think it may not have succeeded because, well, 10 ppm is a LOT of ozone, dangerous in even short exposures, and the people that will work for hotel wages are just not well enough trained to work with something that nasty.
The low levels of ozone made by the home ozone industry likely won't help much with the odor, but they will, over time, damage materials and possibly cause an asthma-like irritation.
The ozone machine has to have a reflexive control on it to maintain ozone levels at 10 ppm too, which ups the cost a lot. We worked for some time on a sensor for that, but most companies investigating the deodorizing application gave up on it, as far as I know, and went into water sterilizing instead. Liability concerns may have had something to do with it.
Dangerous Bill
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I have been told that ozone generators work by desensitizing your nose, rather than actually reacting with the odor source.
I have not been able to find the source for that statement though it seems reasonable.
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On Apr 12, 7:15 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Both are true. When I worked around ozone without enough ventilation, I could detect it only by the itching in my throat and a dry sensation at the back of my nose. This effect started at 50 ppb and increased with concentration.
I can tell you that a surprise blast of 30% ozone in the face is no fun at all, and it was a week or more before my throat and nose completely recovered. Luckily I didn't inhale.
But it readily destroys some organic compounds, or and renders others sufficiently polar that they are no longer volatile. It's so reactive that you can actually measure a concentration gradient between the center of a room and positions adjacent to the walls.
I know that it works well on residual cigarette stink, and not very well on dead animal stench. Other odors may vary.
Dangerous Bill
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Dear timothy42b:
wrote:

Saying that a microwave cooks from the inside out sounds reasonable, too. It still is not true.
Yes ozone will desensitize your nose... to the smell of ozone. Enough of it will have other physiological effects as well.
Ozone will not *quite* pass from point of generation to either double carbon bonds or less-than fully oxided sulfur without passing through points in between. But it will come very close to that.
David A. Smith
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wrote:

And yet I've seen it be quite effective on a mildew smell in a space large enough there is no chance it was really removing the odorant.
So I have to believe the desensitization is a bit more general than you think.
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