OT Which direction is your ceiling fan SUPPOSED to run?

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On Fri, 25 Jul 2014 22:42:58 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Even installing sun film on windows is dangerous. The whole front of our office building is basically glass. Faces east. We had sun film installed and within less than 2 weeks we had 6 broken windows. Replaced the sealed units and film, no more failures (3 years ago) These windows are about 4X10 feet or more.
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On Fri, 25 Jul 2014 23:12:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's not unusual. Double-pane glass is at particular risk (which I would presume would be used for even a half-decent sky light). The seals are easily broken due to the uneven expansion of the panes.
I don't know why anyone would block off a skylight, anyway. If you went to the bother (and risk) of installing them, use 'em. I may install a sun shade (blinds) but that's about it.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:27:29 -0700, RobertMacy

If your room is a well insulated adiabatic system, it doesn't matter. The fan just mixes the air until the air in the room is all the same temperature. Whether you mix from the bottom or top has little effect on the final temperature.
However, if the system leaks and is therefore not adiabatic, the story is a little different. Heat will be introduced into the room through the ceiling and windows. The result with be a temperature gradient where the ceiling and window air are warmer than the air near the floor. The only temperature of importance is your head, which radiates most of the waste heat from your body. Because it is closer to the ceiling than the floor, a fan blowing downward will heat your head instead of cooling it, as you observed.
So, if you have a leaky system, blow the colder air from the floor upwards. If you have a well insulated system, it doesn't matter as all the air will eventually be the same temperature.
If you have a thermistor temp probe and meter, you could wave it around various locations in the room and see how you're doing on insulation. If you find that the ceiling air is very much warmer than room air (near the floor), it might pay to look into a ceiling exhaust fan.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On 7/3/2014 9:19 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I would love to see a reference for this factoid. It is an often perpetuated myth that half you heat leaves your body through your head. Simply not supported by the facts.

This statement shows no understanding of human physiology. Even ignoring the issue of perspiration and evaporative cooling, the human body is nominally at 98°F and will be cooled better in an airstream of even 90°F than in still air.
--

Rick

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On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:19:00 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

It does matter because blowing down you typically get a breeze blowing down on you, which has a cooling effect, especially in summer, when you're going to sweat more.
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On Thu, 03 Jul 2014 16:27:29 -0700, RobertMacy

Down in Summer, up in Winter. A breeze cools.

It doesn't do anything for the temperature (other than raise it slightly - power dissipation of the fan) but a breeze will cool you off. You don't want this in the Winter but you may want to mix the air, so it should be up and on low so you don't feel a draft. Low will mix the air, just fine.

DOWN
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On 07/03/2014 04:27 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

Move the air down in the summer so the breeze keeps you cool, move the air up in the winter to push the heat out of hugging the ceiling.
Jon
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Hi Robert,

If the fan has been off for a while, there will be a pool of hot air near the ceiling. When you turn the fan on, it may feel warmer for a while until that hot air mixes with the cooler air below.

A ceiling fan doesn't change the actual temperature in the room (watch your thermometer). It just feels cooler because the air moves across your skin. That's why you should only run the fan when you're in the house. You're just wasting energy if you're not in the house to feel the breeze.
In a closed room, it really shouldn't make any difference which way the fan blows. The fan simply circulates the air, one direction or the other, but it moves the same amount of air either way. Doorways and other openings can alter the airflow somewhat, but that's the basic principle.
That said, the breeze will be strongest directly in front of the fan where it is less dispersed. Since I spend more time walking beneath the fan than I do above it, I always have my fan blowing down. That way I am more likely to feel the air flow.
In any case, try both directions and see which is more comfortable in your home where you spend the most time.
I rarely use my ceiling fan in the winter. I don't want air moving across my skin to make me feel cooler. About the only time I use the fan in the winter is if we are using our woodstove, in which case it helps equalize the heat in the house instead of being warm in one room and cool in the others.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Friday, July 4, 2014 2:08:16 AM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

It can certainly change the temperature at the lower part of the room. Hot air rises and a fan blowing down will push hot air down.
It just feels cooler because the air moves across your

That's the main effect that I've seen. The air being pushed down may be a little warmer, but the effect of the breeze is more significant and you feel cooler.
That's why you should only run the fan when you're in the house.

+1

It makes a big difference, because with the air blowing up, there is little direct breeze on you. With it down, there is a direct breeze.

Bingo

+1 to that. I never use mine in winter either.
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system designed for? UP or DOWN

Fans "cool" by moving air across your skin; the moving air evaporates moisture from your skin...the more that moves and the faster it moves, the cooler you will feel. Therefore, blow the air down to feel cooler.
Hot air rises. In winter, blow air up so that the warmer air at the ceiling will be blown down.
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dadiOH
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On 7/3/2014 7:27 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

Once the air gets mixing, it makes little difference. Down usually lets you feel the breeze more for some evaporative cooling that you don't want in the winter. Up is a little more gentle.
The fan eliminates stratification, but in your vase it was detrimental because the cooler air is where you were but in mixed in the hot air above. You probably wanted to exhaust the air from the ceiling, bur just mixed it.
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On 07/03/2014 06:27 PM, RobertMacy wrote:
[snip]

Running the fan likely has very little (if any) effect on room temperature. It does help carry heat away from your body, lowering it's temperature (unless, of course, you're in a room hotter than your body and need more than a fan).

Forget the rules and try both ways. If there's a difference, run it that way. If no difference don't worry about it.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On 7/3/2014 7:27 PM, RobertMacy wrote:

Having the air blowing across you allows the body's normal cooling system to function -- more air means more cooling. To me that means down in the summer and up in the winter. Of course if you have too small a fan or run it too slowly or the air stream isn't actually getting to you (e.g.: air is coming down in the middle of the room and you are sitting in a far corner) it isn't going to do much.
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Anybody else here think ceiling fans are just pointless all together?
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On 7/9/2014 2:03 AM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

Which direction is this usenet thread supposed to blow?
--
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Christopher A. Young
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On Wednesday, July 9, 2014 2:03:36 AM UTC-4, Cydrome Leader wrote:

Not me. I think they produce a breeze in summer that is both cooling and soothing. Even if you're outside, which 75F day is more pleasant? One that is dead calm, or one with a light breeze?
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On 7/9/2014 8:46 AM, trader_4 wrote:

runs to the right.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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On 7/9/2014 2:03 AM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

Used properly in the right location, they work. They are not a cure for all your environmental ills. One use for them it to gently move around the air in a room to keep a constant temperature and eliminate hot and cold spots. Not rvery room needs that though.
It's a tool. Use it properly.
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Probably a bit late...
From the current issue of Home Power magazine: "Making the Most of Your Ceiling Fan" <http://www.homepower.com/articles/home-efficiency/electricity/making-most-your-ceiling-fan The temperature of the motor was far higher than anything else in the room, including windows exposed to direct sunlight. Not only was the fan not cooling the people who weren’t in the room, but it was also working as a little space heater.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On 7/23/2014 11:22 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Is this a joke article? He lists some useful info and then draws faulty conclusions. I think the lead in line is a perfect example...
A ceiling fan can heat up to about 100°F when running
Wow! 100°F!!! That is pretty much nothing. The incandescent light bulb in the same fixture is thousands of degrees and likely puts off more heat. I think the case for the fan heating the room is a bit overstated. More useful would have been a simple statement of the wattage of the fan. The comparison to the windows is totally absurd. They let in direct radiant heat from the outside. I can assure you than nearly any window in your house lets in more heat in the summer than the fan puts off. The temperature of the glass has no bearing on the heat coming in through the window.
--

Rick

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