OT T Boone Pickens

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He has been telling us for quite a few weeks that he has a plan.
Why waste money on commercials saying you will be telling us something in the future?
I have something to say......I will be saying it in the next few weeks.
BTW it will be.............I want you tax payers to pay for the grid I need so I can start selling you wind power instead of oil.
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metspitzer wrote:

prefer we sit around with our thumbs up our ass blaming oil company profits.
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 18:25:03 -0400, Frank

Did you know Harry is AKA "Pinky", by his constituents?
Described as Pelosi in a dress (non-constituents), but his nic is really Pinky.
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wrote:

I suspected the ad, "next few weeks", would imply his web site as a start. Not been there yet.
He called history the largest transfer of wealth to foreigners...
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metspitzer wrote:

He wants to build wind farms. Using his own, and investor, money. It won't cost the taxpayer anything - it will cost the consumer something like $3.00/month to pay for the transmission lines.
Not in Texas, though. Texas has its own electrical grid. It's not connected to the national grid. This means that one or two levels of regulatory approval are not necessary to build transmission towers.
Still, to build transmission lines from the wind farms to where the power will be needed will require rights-of-way. Because of fuddy-duddies, this will probably require imminent domain, court cases, new state laws, pay-offs, and mostly, time.
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HeyBub wrote:

It is physically connected.
Did you mean not connected in a regulatory sense?
--

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the state of texas has its own seperate power grid not normally powering others or getting power from out of state.
since the first oil crisis of 1972 our country has ignored the problem almost entirely.
too much big business making money off the status quo..........
in 1972 a buddy of mine converted his vehicles to dual fuel and has run both primarily on compressed natural gas ever since.
works fine pollutes little, costs less to operate
part of pickens plan is converting to natural gas to power vehicles.
doing nothing is no longer a viable option, the high cost of energy is crippling our economy
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

The operative word there is "normally" -- there are tieins of the ERCOT grid to the rest of the country, just not as extensive. There have been studies in the relatively recent past on increasing those ties but I haven't paid attention since I retired on what the status is.
--
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G. Morgan wrote:

Um, you're right. There are a few physical connections. Still, Texas, which uses 40% more electricity than California (peak demand in excess of 75GW), is not really a player in the national grid. 85% of the power generation companies in Texas have agreed to neither buy nor sell their power outside the state. The state, therefore, is largely exempt from federal regulatory oversight.
There are four interconnections to points outside the state (including Mexico).* Together they have a capacity of about 500 megawatts. There is one 600 megawatt line that connects the Texas grid to points in east Texas that are part of the "Eastern" U.S. grid, but the service is still designed for Texans.
--------- * A 220 MW line to Oklahoma, A 36 MW line to Mexico in El Paso, Two lines, totaling 250 MW, also to Mexico, near McAllen.
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Bwahahahaha! PT Barnum lives!

Yeah, that won't entail any cost to taxpayers!
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He has a website:
http://hboonepickens.com
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http://tboonepickens.com (corrected)

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Oooooooooooooo, metspitzer. I shall anxiously await your prophesy/spew.
Hand me a cold one.
Steve
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 18:11:20 -0700 (PDT), ransley

political parties have been steering us into a global market. (actually big business and the banks)
You want energy independence for the US? You want national security? Tell us how you plan to getting that, when open borders is clearly next on the agenda?
I missed the part about how you made your billions.
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ransley wrote: ...

I've seen nothing on anything other than installed capacity, nothing about what actual consumption percentages are. Assuming a summer day of (say) 15 daylight hours, 30% capacity if all online would translate to <20% maximum on average and, of course, essentially 0% for the other 9hrs. This only gets worse in winter. Meanwhile, standby generation of some other form has to be there for the load.
And, while making some pacification of the Greens, the installation of the solar they have is made possible only by very heavily subsidizing same.
--
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Solar power does not have to be a total solution to the entire problem in order to be a huge help. We don't need one grand sweeping solution. We need many solutions that cumulatively put us on a better track.
BTW - I'm currently looking into coverting my home heating to Geo-Thermal. Expensive sounding up front, but even if the cost of fuel stabilizes (Yeah, right!) the roughly $25k system will be "break even" in less than 10 years, and after that, I'll be saving thousands a year. Possibly a lot less than 10 years if fuel prices continue to go up. A higher capacity system doesn't add cost at a 1-1 rate, so I may even join forces with my next door neighbor and we can feed both houses on one ground source. That would really make this a no-brainer as long as we get the legal part straight.
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wrote:

Of course the same is being said for off-shore drilling. Interestingly, though, is that solar and wind power doesn't seem to haave gotten that much more traction than the drilling in real life. We are a nation of Scarlet O'Haras " I can't think about that right now. If I do, I'll go crazy. I'll think about that tomorrow."
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Solar for electricity isn't being deployed to any significant extent because it's economically unviable. It is being deployed in small amounts by govt heavily subsidizing it. Here in NJ, they levied a tax on all electric bills to generate a fund. Part of that is being used so that people can buy a $50K, 5KW home system for $15K, which then makes it viable.
Oil drilling in new areas with high potential, ie ANWR and offshore, is blocked by the environmental extremists.
Wind is the more interesting. That one is always put forward by the environmentalists as a great solution. Yet, when it comes down to actually building them, the usual environmental extremists shoot many of them down.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: ...

The problem w/ wind is still one of inconsistency. I've posted before results of a sizable wind farm in W KS (Gray County) which in seven years operation has overall average of <50% installed capacity w/ months (mid-summer and -winter) where monthly average is only 20%. Thus would take as much as 5X installed capacity to have a chance of producing the required power as installed on that long an averaging scale. It's worse as the time scale is shortened, of course, including the problem that the wind typically also goes down at night after losing solar heating. These data are available from EIA site for a farm in the prime area for wind generation in the US. Again, it's a piece but it's no panacea as many proponents who don't worry about the realities of making their wishes true would like to think (or probably more correctly, make others think).
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