OT sort of; bottled water

Page 4 of 5  
wrote:

You just can't beat that Beaver Piss Water!!! We should be the first to bottle it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

I always chuckle when I see bottled water. The water is great in my area.
There is a large water bottling plant down the road from my office. They bottle exclusively for Walmart and at any time there are dozens of trailers queued to be loaded.
There is a spring fed lake about 30 miles away that was used as a municipal water supply. It became seriously polluted and was taken out of service. There are dozens of tanker trucks that run back and forth between the polluted lake and the bottling plant so they can claim they use "spring water". I don't know what filtering is used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I guess polluted spring water is better than no spring water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 7/28/2007 1:08 PM George said the following:

I have a 325' deep well and the water is great, even unfiltered. Guests used to take our water home in whatever they could carry it in. We used to save all our milk bottles and I used to bring lots of them full to my mother's house in DE when I visited. There is a spring water plant a few miles from me. The water comes out of a mountain and fills a large tank inside a small building. Tanker trucks visit the plant daily and the water is pumped into the trucks, which then go off to the bottling plants. When there is too much water from the spring, the excess if drained off through a 3" pipe into a ditch alongside the road. I've passed that plant many times when I used to commute and there were always people filling up milk bottles from the pipe.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was always skeptical about bottled water and never buy any. I will drink off a water fountain in the mall or else get my usual coffee black. If I am very thirsty, then a large iced coke. Bottled water tastes exactly the same as my municipal tap water and I don't intend to pay more than a buck to drink a cuppa (bottle). Once I made a Sno-Cat trip up the Columbia Ice Fields in the Rocky Mountains. We were encouraged to drink the glacier melt water. I have to admit it was the sweetest water I had ever tasted. That's strange because it was pure water and the only difference was perhaps more than ten thousand years old.
There is another weird bottled water experience. I had assumed that demineralized water would be equivalent to distilled water. So I used some to top up a motorcycle battery. I clould have sworn I heard a "click" and the plates turned dark immediately. The battery went dead as a doornail and no amount of overcharging could restore even the tiniest flicker of life to it.
===============================
SCIENCE NEWS July 27, 2007 http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?alias=aquafina-labels-to-spell&chanID=sa003&modsrc=reuters Aquafina labels to spell out source: tap water
Aquafina labels to spell out source: tap water Water drips from a tap at a home in Manchester, northern England, March 27, 2006. PepsiCo Inc. will spell out that its Aquafina bottled water is made with tap water, a concession to the growing environmental and political opposition to the bottled water industry. REUTERS/Phil Noble By Martinne Geller
NEW YORK (Reuters) - PepsiCo Inc. will spell out that its Aquafina bottled water is made with tap water, a concession to the growing environmental and political opposition to the bottled water industry.
According to Corporate Accountability International, a U.S. watchdog group, the world's No. 2 beverage company will include the words "Public Water Source" on Aquafina labels.
"If this helps clarify the fact that the water originates from public sources, then it's a reasonable thing to do," said Michelle Naughton, a Pepsi-Cola North America spokeswoman.
Pepsi Chief Executive Indra Nooyi told Reuters earlier this week the company was considering such a move.
Pepsi's Aquafina and Coca-Cola Co's Dasani are both made from purified water sourced from public reservoirs, as opposed to Danone's Evian or Nestle's Poland Spring, so-called "spring waters," shipped from specific locations the companies say have notably clean water.
Coca-Cola Co. told Reuters it will start posting online information about the quality control testing it performs on Dasani by the end of summer or early fall.
"Concerns about the bottled-water industry, and increasing corporate control of water, are growing across the country," said Gigi Kellett, director of the "Think Outside the Bottle" campaign, which aims to encourage people to drink tap water.
San Francisco's mayor banned city employees from using city funds to buy bottled water when tap water is available. Ann Arbor, Michigan passed a resolution banning commercially bottled water at city events and Salt Lake City, Utah asked department heads to eliminate bottled water.
Critics charge the bottled water industry adds plastic to landfills, uses too much energy by producing and shipping bottles across the world and undermines confidence in the safety and cleanliness of public water supplies, all while much of the world's population is without access to clean water.
But industry observers said such opposition is unlikely to drain U.S. sales of bottled water, which reached 2.6 billion cases in 2006, according to Beverage Digest. The industry newsletter estimated that U.S. consumers spent about $15 billion on bottled water last year.
"Consumers have an affection for bottled water. It's not an issue of taste or health, it's about convenience," the newsletter's publisher, John Sicher, said. "Try walking up (New York City's) Third Avenue on a hot day and getting a glass of tap water."
Dave Kolpak, a portfolio manager at Victory Capital Management, said the environmental objections will have little impact on the bottom line for either Pepsi or Coke, though he admitted it could slow the market's growth rate.
"Pepsi and Coke do not make a lot of profit" on bottled water, said Kolpak, adding that people may talk about the issue, but will likely continue buying some bottled water. Victory Capital owns about 3 million shares of PepsiCo among its $62 billion under management.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Drinking glacial melt water can give you a different sort of problem than bad taste. Giardia poisioning comes to mind. I've had that too, caught it on the Wonderland Trail when the water ran out and I had to resort to snow melt. That wasn't fun either, for the first few months at least. Trust me, I NEVER can have enough water purification tablets in my pack now-a-days.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?alias=aquafina-labels-to-spell&chanID=sa003&modsrc=reuters
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's interesting to realize that almost all the water we drink is the same water that has been here since the first water.
There has been a tiny percentabe of water destoyed by electrolyis, and proably a tiny bit made somehow, but the vast majority is original water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 28 Jul 2007 09:38:56 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

LOL
They say something like that, but the number is nonsense. I drink loads of water, but I can't drink the numbe they say, proably 8.
I keep a half-gallon milk bottle full of water in the fridge, sometimes two bottles, but it takes a day and a quarter to drink one of them.
I'm only 5'8" but if that makes a difference, they should say so. There are plenty of people smaller than I am.

Yup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 28 Jul 2007 09:38:56 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

We have these small buildings around strip malls that sell water. Folks can go buy a five gallon jug. I see many construction workers filling the IGLOO coolers for the day. All this water is from an RO system in the water stand. Not sure how much it cost, though.
-- Oren
"If things get any worse, I'll have to ask you to stop helping me."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've lived in towns, and worked at job sites, where the water tasted terrible, due to mineral content. Probably safe to drink, but tasted like crap. Pure distilled water doesn't taste great either. (<lack> of some chemical? Low 'free' O2 content? Jump in here, fellow from the water treatment company.)
In situations like that, I could probably rationalize away buying bottle or jug water for drinking water purposes, the same as when they have an oopsie with the treatment plant, or a flood or something, and tell everyone not to drink the tap water. As for me, I only buy bottle water when traveling, to have something chilled to sip on the highway. (I never remember to pack a cooler, and pretty much all the soda pop they sell in the stations tastes like crap to me.)
My well water here is tolerable tasting, but not great. Had to put in a softener due to iron content. Fridge has a door dispenser with a filter, but the line is tea-kettled up, and a bottle takes forever to fill. If I dump the ice bin in the sink, after it melts, it leaves a white ring. Best tasting water I've ever had was from wells, but you have to hit the right water layer- I've seen subdivisions where everyone had deep wells that tasted like crap, but there was a layer of sweet water at less than 20 feet.
aem sends....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There's medical people that will back this up....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But they will also tell you that the recommendation does not have to mean 8 glasses of "water". Everything that has water in it qualifies toward the daily allowance (even the food you eat).
That many people have perverted the advice to mean "I must drink 64 ounces of clear unadulterated H2O per day" is not surprising given that most people are clueless.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They may back it up with personal opinion, but beyond that there is zippo. A couple years ago some researchers did a very thorough search to see what basis there was for the 8 glasses a day recommendation. Their conclusion was that while it's often repeated as established fact, there was no research, no study, nothing at all to back it up. It' just a number someone came up with a long time ago that keeps being repeated.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The Israeli Army did an experiment. They marched a company from the Sinai to Lebanon - some 300 miles - from dawn to dusk. Every soldier was required to drink some enormous amount of water - I recall it was one liter per hour - during the march. At the end, no one had dropped out and the soldiers were in superb physical shape.
Evidently, one can ingest too little water; we don't know yet if one can drink too much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes people can drink too much water. Runners get water intoxication all the time when they drink too much water and not take in sufficient minerals. I've had it before - it sucks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 Jul 2007 12:01:39 -0700, "Eigenvector"

As participants in KDND-FM's water-drinking contest chugged bottle after bottle, a listener called in to warn the disc jockeys that the stunt was dangerous - and could be fatal.
"Yeah, we're aware of that," one of them responded.
Another DJ said with a laugh: "Yeah, they signed releases, so we're not responsible. We're OK."
California Sheriff Looks into Water-Drinking Death
http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp?siteSection=1&id4466
-- Oren
"If things get any worse, I'll have to ask you to stop helping me."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 Jul 2007 12:01:39 -0700, "Eigenvector"

That is why UF invented gatorade, football training in the hot sun
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:14:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

UF stands for United Fruit, right.
I thought Gatorade was invented by UR, United Reptile.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I deleted the message too quickly. Someone wrote that UF stands for United Fruit. Well, Gatorade must be made by the HDLPE company.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Same here, and you are RIGHT ON.
While not a "runner", a few years ago I worked a particularly hard day outdoors. It was VERY hot. I trimmed trees, climbed poles and, on one job, and ALL of my ladders out - the works. I sweat like a pig and drank water like it was going out-of-style.
I drank no Gatorade<tm> or anything else - just water. Bad move. VERY bad move.
Overnight that night, virtually EVERY muscle in my body cramped terribly. I was in misery the entire night.
Now, on hot days outside, of the fluid I drink, about 2/3 is water and 1/3 is Gatorade<tm>. It does the trick as I've had no recurrence of the trouble I had before. Never again. <sigh>
--
:)
JR

Climb poles and dig holes
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.