OT sort of; bottled water

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Steam distillation isn't the only method used. As for putting the minerals back, it does sound wasteful, but really it isn't if you consider what they are looking for. Suppose the water had (ignore the numbers they're just examples) 5% iron, 1% manganese, 0.5% sodium, and 20% copper - it might taste fine out of the tap, but they're selling a product and that product has to be consistent with every batch. So they remove the minerals, then put them back in the exact proportions required by the company - 4.33% iron, 0.6% manganese, 1% sodium, 10% copper. They can only do that by distilling it, then adding the minerals back. Seasons come and go and the mineral content changes with them.
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On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 21:41:35 -0700, "Eigenvector"

I see your point, and you make it well.
STill, this seems like so much trouble. I was happier when I thought they just opened the faucet and let it fill the bottle.
I think that was the system in the office I worked in NYC where they had these really big bottles that went upside down in the water dispenser. They did this because I think there was no water pipe handy. I think the bottles didn't even have a company name on them.
My ex=girlfriend has a water filter on her sink faucet. When I'm there, I've tried to be nice to her by using the filtered water, so I won't seem to be scoffing at her. She says the water tastes terrible. She lives 10 miles away and uses the same water company, Baltimore, that I do, and I think the water tastes fine. So I'm going to go to her house and drink straight from the tap and see if I can taste a difference from mine. Both of our immediate n'hoods are about 30 or 40 years old, but there were some houses in both places 40 years earlier, so I don't know much about the water mains, or if hers are like mine.
Our water comes from 3 big reservoirs. I'm not sure what the soil is made of or how much they keep fertilizer etc. from being used in the watershed. There are a lot of hills and streams here so some watersheds are pretty narrow, but I think there is farmland upstream from one reservoir.
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In NYC the green folks are now going after the bottled water makers. And they have a good point. Shipping all this water around uses a lot of energy. Some of it comes from overseas. How much energy does it take to ship water from Fiji to NYC? And then there are all the plastic bottles, which take resources and energy to make and are a disposal problem. If you think about it, it's pretty stupid, when California wants to ban incandescent light bulbs to save energy. Especially when NYC tap water has won blind tasting tests as one of the best drinking waters.
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2007 07:01:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I agree with you. When I lived in Brooklyn 32-24 years ago, everyone in the city drank tap water and they were happy.
How is the third water tunnel coming?
I have a feeling the NY reservoirs are better than the ones around here, because I think NY got started earlier.
Baltimore was, in terms of sewage, sort of a cesspool for several decades after other cities had taken action. The city would just discharge untreated sewage into the Jones Falls, sort of the primary river on the north side of Baltimore. So I'm thinking, but haven't checked, that they relied on wells or streams for water longer than NYC.
Besides our 3 reservoirs, there are two south and southwest of here that supply Washington DC. The WSSD, iirc, Washington Sewer and Sanitary District maybe. Besides miscellaneous houses and farmhouses, they flooded a whole town when they built one, less than 100 years ago, I think. During one drought, parts of the town became visible again. (The cemetery wasn't flooded, unlike in Deliverance)
Back to Baltimore, I think maybe the third reservoir is only about 70 years old, and when it was built, the designer wanted a pipeline to the Delaware river, maybe 40 miles away, in case we ever ran out of water. Some people argued with him but he was respected and they did what he wanted. Finally used it about 60 years later, probably during the same drought.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The "purified water" like Aquafina and Dasani are produced locally and not shipped internationally, something the "green" types either don't understand or willfully ignore. They also ignore the shelf life aspect as well, try bottling tap water for your emergency kit (earthquake, tornado, hurricane, etc.) and then test it to see if it's safe to drink a year later.
Pete C.
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wrote:

I vote for "willfully ignore". Let's not complicate their debate with facts, common sense or economics.

Aw, I think you're being a bit too rough on tap water, Pete. :)
As an RVer of many years, I have become a quasi-expert on the "care and feeding" of a water system. I'm sure that wine-makers and home brewers are equally, or more, up-to-speed, water-wise.
Of course, my contention that year-old tap water is quite safe and stable requires that the water is in compliance with EPA standards for the municipal system of a first-class city. It also requires careful storage practices: A clean container/system and storage in a dark, temperate environment.
I suspect there is more EMOTION and hype directed at the bottled water consumer than any REAL health or safety benefit. I prefer cheap, bottled water during the summer because, when drinking it in quantity with ice, purified water simply "tastes" better. It has virtually NO taste to me.
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JR

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Jim Redelfs wrote:

Indeed.
Nope. Having spent a few days at a CC bottling plant I have no doubt whatsoever that the filtered water they are bottling is significantly cleaner than tap water in almost any location. That doesn't meat that the tap water isn't safe of course, just that the bottled water is cleaner since it travels only through a few hundred feet of stainless steel piping that is sanitized probably a dozen times a day vs. tap water traveling through miles of decades old piping of various types that is semi sanitized a couple times a year at best.

I sanitize the water system on my camper at the start of each season and again any time it's sat unused for more than a month or two.
As for wine and beer, I do home brew, and I can assure you that tap water is not used as-is. While it may start as tap water, it is all boiled to kill off the various micro organisms in it before it is used for brewing. Everything the water and beer will contact and indeed everything in the immediate area is also heavily sanitized before brewing.

If you were to boil the tap water before bottling in sanitized bottles it would likely be ok. If you bottle it as-is with all the micro organisms it's picked up traveling through miles of very old water mains, I seriously doubt it will be safe after a year of stagnation.

The health benefit is very real - the convenience of the bottled water makes it more likely that people will drink water vs. soda which certainly is a health benefit. The safety benefit applies most to the bottled water in your emergency kit.
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:
SNIP HAPPENS

Too few first class and eagle scouts around these days.
Making tap water storable and safe isnt difficult.
It takes an eyedroper and liquid clorine bleach, and you'll never know bu the taste its been "fixed" if stored in gallon or larger jugs.
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But it won't last for a year or more. Civil Defence has to replace the water kegs on a yearly basis to prevent bacterial and alge growth. Chlorine won't kill all the bacteria, there are even chlorine resistant bacteria. The only way to make it potable over long durations is distillation.
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No they don't hav "to replace the water on yearly basis to prevent ... growth." Replacement is a matter of policy, it is insurance just like the stored water itself. That, and it is cheaper to replace than to test. The longer water is stored, the more likely something MAY go wrong, not necessarily that something WILL go wrong, even biological growth. The keg might breakdown or be damaged and start leaking, various other kinds of contamination can come thru the plastic keg, or oxidation can contaminate metal kegs. Or yes, biological growth is a possiblity.

LOL!!
That is utter nonsense for any reasonable definition of "long durations". Have you ever canned peaches or pears? Kill any organisms which might grow and make certain none can get it. Simple. Water can also be canned and then it is preserved for a very long time. And that is if you want certainty. Want to play the odds a bit? Unlike Vegas, most will win...
I pump water out of a hole in the ground that has supposedly been there for many years, then I drink it with no treatment whatsoever. My folks live in a small town that pumps water said to be several thousand years old, aka "fossil water," and distributes it thru the town without treatment. I'd consider that "long durations." Consider that water was on the ground since it was last distilled yet is totally potable today.
I also have two 55 gallon drums downstairs that I filled from my well in 2001. I was going to refill them last year, but the water was still perfectly fine so I left it as it was. I did put a few CCs of clorox in each barrel for insurance as I was filling it. But mostly the cool and the dark do the job. If I fill a clear soda bottle with water and leave it on the kitchen counter (think light) for a couple of months, it fills with something organic...
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So where does your bottled water come from? The same sources that have the salt, fertilizer, hospital waste and fish poop that your local source uses. No way around it. You may have local problems, but that bottle of water you just bought may have been my urine last week. I use a charcoal filter for my water.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

You seem to loose sight of the fact that the municipal water supply treats water so that it meets the standards for municipal water, while the bottling plant takes that municipal water and treats it to a higher standard for beverage production, a standard that is a good deal higher than what your charcoal filter will produce.
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Perhaps. Some municipal water is better than some bottled water from test results I've seen. Varies, or course, but bottled water was still subjected to the same contamination the OP was trying to avoid. It did not come from some pure reservoir.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Unless you differentiate between bottled spring water which could well be comparable or lower purity than municipal water, and bottled purified water which will pretty much always be higher purity than municipal water, you're not making a valid comparison.
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Does not matter, that was not my original point. My original point was that the OP says he is using bottled water because municipal water comes from nasty sources. So does bottled water. If I take a leak today, someone is going to drink it next week be it in a bottle, tumbler, spring, lake, whatever. Just the way the water system of the planet works.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Yea, and the water you consumed to make that piss was part of a steaming dinosaur turd at some point too. None of that has any relevance to the quality of today's water, be it tap, spring or purified.
Pete C.
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That was my point, It cannot be avoided. Thank you for recognizing it.
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On Wed, 01 Aug 2007 20:15:34 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

When you say a bottle of water costs a buck, that assumes you are buying one from a convenience store cooler and it costs about as much as a coke. What is your other option? If you want a cup of water from the self serve fountain it will cost as much as a coke too. They charge you for the cup, no matter what you put in it. Same as bottled water..
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mm,
Like you I caught that on the tube. I only gave it 1/2 an ear but I don't think the expert said that they use all of these different processes in a sequence to create "pure" water. I think he was saying that any of these processes will get the job done. I do buy distilled water at the supermarket occasionally.
Dave M.
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I had a bottle of this shit the other day when I was on a course. I thought it tasted horrible, rather dead tasting. I normally don't drink much water, bottled or otherwise, but I like tap water just fine. Although we do filter it to take out the chlorine. The best water I remember was the well water I had as a kid. But we had it tested once and they said it was full of organic something or other (Beaver Piss). It seems the well was too close to the pond.
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