OT, I guess. What happens with FIOS

Page 1 of 3  
A friend tells me tonight that if you subscribe to FIOS from Verizon, at least when you use it for everything you have (tv, internet, phone, or any subset) when they install the optical cable, they take out your copper.
So that you can never go back.
He says that even if you sell your house, the new owner can't get simple copper phone or DSL line, unless he pays someone privately to reinstall the copper wires.
That's why my friend kept a simple phone line, and didn't get VOIP.
That's what he says, and he's no dummy. Does anyone think he's wrong?
Is Verizon only in the mid-atlantic, or the northeast?
(Missa, this would explain why it is worth it to dig those trenches and holes to run lines where there are few or no subscribers. Talk to me later.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 9/13/2007 10:48 PM mm said the following:

I would think that the telephone and cable tv companies would have something to say about who can remove their equipment.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

its true, verizon is spending billions, and pushing to convert everyone to fibre. once you get fios you can never go back to copper.
I am very sorry I supposedly upgraded from DSL to FIOS, the internet portion is great but I have had serious long lasting bad phone troubles, and they really dont care about poor phone service.
If I had to to do over again i would of kept with DSL
after weeks of calling at the end multiple times daily they finally had a network tech troubleshoot and fix the problem that effected our central office, a noisey bad T1 router.
it shouldnt of taken over a month to fix it and I am so pissed I have thought about dropping that line altogether.
their service sucks:(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Around here, Verizon IS the owner of the phone lines. Verizon is the phone company. (TPC in "The President's Analyst" a movie that could have been great, but iirc wasn't.)
No one is taking out cable. If my use of "copper" seemed to include cable, I apologize. But the only phone service avaialble on cable is VOIP iiuc, and not everyone wants that. Not me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

-The President's Analyst was a very clever movie. If you haven't seen it you should.
As for OP, once copper or fiber enters your space, it's yours. Not theirs.
I can't imagine any provider physically removing anything, anyhow. Except for some termination device, maybe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ng_reader wrote:

Back in Green decision and deregulation, ma bell tried that (it's OUR cable and devices).
But changed their mind real fast when the lawsuits rolled in for damages to the building, both inside and out ;-)
walls, wallcoverings, flooring, siding, walkways etc...
If it's attached to your property, it's yours. but if it's attached to a surface they provided, it's their's except for the surface- which you get to keep. think plywood or synthetic mounting board.
-larry / dallas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I am buying a house, the last thing on my mind would be whether or not it has a copper phone line. It's not going to make or break a sale.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you avoid the ripoff bundled services and keep standard phone line you will still have copper. I would only get internet and TV over FIOS,

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
14 Sep 2007 04:03:42 -0700, wrote:

Step 1 of *any* Verizon FIOS install is to move your phone line(s) from copper to fiber, even if you're not changing your phone service. I've read reports that a few people were able to convince the installer to leave the copper in place, but I don't think that's official Verizon policy.
Another reason not to go off copper:
If you have FIOS, during a power outage, the battery in your network interface box is your only backup. Two hours or so in, you'll lose phone service. The old copper lines are mostly backed up by generators at the central office. I've never lost phone service during a power outage.
--
Seth Goodman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Seth Goodman wrote:

Correction, the main backup at phone company central offices is banks of batteries. There are generators but the battery banks can keep the phone service up for days. If anyone wants to know about storage batteries, the phone companies have a great deal of knowledge and experience. The battery rooms at at phone company central offices would astound you. An example of what is in them is here:
http://tinyurl.com/2e6z9d
They have some BFB's, (Big Freaking Batteries)
[8~{} Uncle Monster
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Sep 2007 14:54:46 -0500, Uncle Monster

I got to see the (phone co. battery room) in Fort Worth about 25 years ago. They had a lot of big batteries, some of which came out of old submarines.
--
102 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Lloyd wrote:

Most people have no idea of what's in those nondescript buildings and under the streets and sidewalks of their cities and towns.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Uncle Monster" wrote:

Orgies with operators.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Sep 2007 19:36:41 -0500, Uncle Monster

This all started when they started putting the gas pipes and electric wires IN the walls. They should have left them outside so people would appreciate how complicated they are. Easier to repair too.
I agree that it's hard to realize, even if one knows, how much stuff is down there. I think there is a big oil pipe running from Texas to New Jersey and and non-consumer gas pipes all over the place, and lots of stuff liket that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Uncle Monster wrote:

Update! The large Central Office battery rooms are shrinking fast: Solid state equipment is more power efficient. CO's are now unmanned. CO only has 12-24 hr battery. CO has no generator. Lead and sulfuric acid are banned or hazmat.
It's much more cost effective to pull up a portable 50KW Onan at the CO building and "plug" into the charger buss. One portable can easily support a dozen COs during long, wide area power outages and "parked" where needed.
The cell sites work the same way.
The phone companies are quietly doing away with the massive lead liability they had. Find a piece of lead jacketed phone cable these days, and figure the tons of lead leached from aerial cable.
Your copper phone line is now powered from a local neighborhood fiber fed "hut" or RemoteTerminal and a few automotive sized batteries. It's not a big city thing either, rural Adams County Pa now has many more RTs than COs!
All this new fiber stuff is moving the RT and terrabits to your back door ;-)
-larry / dallas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
larry wrote:

Did you go to the site I posted? It shows the new technology in batteries that are now in use and there are some pictures of the remote equipment and the newer battery rooms. I have, on more than occasion, dug up lead sheathed power and telecom cables. Before the advent of solid plastic UF power cable, the only thing that worked well for direct burial was a romex like cable with oiled paper insulation and a lead sheath. I've come across old telecom cable that had oiled paper insulated small wires in lead. I'll bet it was a real chore to make water proof splices.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
larry wrote:

Its just a cost cutting measure. A lot of people don't realize how Mickey Mouse some carriers infrastructure really is. The traditional old school carriers such as Verizon still have lots of battery and also installed generators.
Same is true of the cell carriers. Verizon Wireless has battery and almost always an installed generator at each cell site. Other operators typically have only minimal battery and a power connector.
A trailer mounted generator might be a good idea for a really local outage but having one installed on each site is just a little nicer. Ask anyone who was in the hurricanes in Florida about wireless carriers and they will tell you only one of them was up during the storms and for the weeks after when there was no commercial power.
I know someone who works for a particular wireless carrier and he tells me they have exactly two trailer mounted generators to cover 2 1/2 states.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

little. There is a massive amount of copper busswork that has to be moved/ reconfigured.

ferros are built like a tank and have been known to survive lightning.

monitoring instead, sometimes including video.

sets.
service. By the way, the VRLA (Valve Regulated Lead Acid) batteries used in many cell sites & remotes contain the same hazardous chemicals.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FIOS CO are unmanned serviced by roving groups of techs
I believe the battery backup is good for a hour or two tops of continious talk time, and the internet part dies immediately when power fails.
The latest from Verizon, if you dont have a phone line as part of the fios line pay over 10 bucks a month more.......
got the letter today......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The use a 12V 7Ah battery for back up. When the battery is new one should get about 84 Whr of power. Depending upon what load it will last differently. When the battery gets older obviously it goest down.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.