OT glass m.wave tray.


Excuse somewhat OT. But knowledgeable group here may be able to help/ comment.
We have a very shallow ex microwave tray/dish just over 12 inches square. Doesn't fit any other m.waves we have.
Moulded into the glass (Which we assume is some sort of Pyrex, heat resistant glass?) is "For microwave use only".
Before trying it in a conventional electric oven, anyone have any idea why this would not be suitable?
BTW tray does have a slight 'spall' (chip) which might be the point of weakness if it does shatter and send burst glass all over the conventional oven!
Have never tried it before and after running a small catering/ cafeteria company for some 30+ years we never did shatter anything in a microwave oven.
Thanks for any insight.
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terry wrote: ...

Because it undoubtedly _isn't_ Pyrex(tm) or similar.
Containers for microwave use avoid materials w/ bonds that have similar energy as that in water which is what primarily is the energy sink in cooking w/ microwaves. With those, you can put them in the microwave and they will not heat up excessively by themselves whereas a non-"microwave safe" dish will.
You may get away w/ using this in the oven but you'll certainly want to be extremely careful and I'd say odds are high it would crack if hot and then tap water were to come in contact with it.
--
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Given th at food is cooked in it, there has to be some heat resistance.
Given the fact that it has a chip and given the fact that Pyrex is fairly cheap (less that $15 US), I'd not take a chance. It may last years, it may crack first use. Worth the risk? Your decision.
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Thank you for the info. probably best not to risk using it in a regular oven. Most likley use it as serving tray at best (but it has that chip!).
Was actually seeking information (knowing how much know-how and skill is available through this group). Replies are much appreciated.
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terry wrote:

Chuckle. I have been looking for a tray like that (but without a chip) to use as a drip tray for my over-the-stove micro without a merry-go-round. Wanted a square one, but all I could find at thrift store was a round one from a merry-go-round. My micro has a wire grid shelf, and any oopsies tend to bake solid around the wires, and leak down to the bottom of the cook box. Just pulling out the drip dray and running through dishwasher really cuts down on how often oven needs scrubbing.
-- aem sends...
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terry wrote:

In addition to the chip, uneven heating would more likely affect something that large. You've gotten good tips from others, but my two cents: Last thanksgiving, hurrying to get the meal on the table, I moved an empty pyrex pie plate and set it on a burner I thought was turned off (glass cooktop). Just after we sat down to our meal in the dining room, the pie plate exploded...there were long, narrow shards of glass all over the kitchen. Had I not been in a hurry, chances are it would have exploded in my face.
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If it takes the stresses of microwave heating it should be suitable in a conventional oven. Interesting that Pyrex can be conventional glass which is tempered while the original Pyrex and Pyrex lab glass is borosilicate glass.
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Frank wrote:

Pyrex is a brand name, and they make a number of products, not all of which are borosilicate. Same deal with Vibram, or Nalgene.
Jon
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-snip-

I *strongly* disagree with that. Microwave safe is not oven safe.
I doubt the glass would ever reach 200 degrees in the microwave. Definitely not 350. It is the last thing to heat up and by 250 meats & veggies would be reduced to un-chewable cardboard & water is vapor.
Have you ever seen an exploding plate? Could happen in the oven, as you're taking it out, or while sitting on the counter cooling. If you use it- especially with a chip- please have the digi-cam on at all times. The video will be as cool as the windmill one.

Not exactly- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borosilicate_glass
Jim
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Its the uneven heat that stresses the glass - not the temperature. Borosilicate glass has lower expansion coefficient which makes it more suitable to take stress. Also there are built in stresses that must be annealed out of any glass. Don't think it's worth my researching. OP can do what ever he wants.
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