OT - Full Size Spare - Or Is It?

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I tried my passenger door lock with a key a few weeks ago. I can barely get the key in, never mind turn it. Power remote locks and/or the driver's door key hole is all I've ever needed. Of course, I should fix it just in case both of the other 2 methods go bad at the same time.
BTW...No remote starter that I've ever had, and I've had a number of them, locked the doors. What's the point of that?
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On Wed, 1 Jan 2014 00:05:41 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

I don't understand the logic either. I believe they all kill the engine if the throttle or brake (or clutch) are touched.
We've had one. That was enough to cure me of that particular laziness.
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Call me lazy, but starting my vehicles from the warmth of my living room or office when there's ice on the windshield sure is convenient. I'll blow snow up and down my street for hours at a time, but I'd still rather go from a warm house to a warm car without having to run out in the cold to start it.
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On Wed, 1 Jan 2014 15:00:26 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

Oh, it was great, when it worked. When it didn't, she didn't get to work. If it was cold, it would flood the car and keep trying its stupid algorithm that got it there, until there was no battery left. We'd have to babysit it anyway, so it wasn't worth the trouble. After-market starters would also void the warrantee for starters and such.
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My remote starters have always been after-market. Different brands, but they all worked the same way: three tries to start the car. After that, they gave up. That's what the manual said it would do, and that's how it worked the one time I "tested" that feature. I had a weak battery and the car wouldn't start. The remote tried three times and then quit. Maybe yours was defective.
The one time we had a problem with a remote starter was with my wife's car. Her car often take 2 tries if it's really cold. Towards the end of last winter, if the car stalled after the first start, the remote wouldn't turn the heater blower, lights or radio off or try to restart it. From some reason it assumed the car was running. After that happened a few times, I called the shop where we bought it 3 to 4 years prior and they replaced the module under the lifetime warranty. No problems since then. If the car stalls, the remote starts it again about 5 seconds later. It never takes more than 2 tries.
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On 1/1/2014 1:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Not in my case. I checked Many dealers put them in too.
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I know a lot of dealers put them in. ...and it still voided the warrantee for any related failures.
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On 1/1/2014 12:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I have a Code-Alarm brand. It locks the doors, then starts the car. Present car is a Hyundai Sonata with Blue Link. When I used it in the free trial period, it would not lock the doors, but it would not start the car until I did and I could do that remotely also.
I did not renew the overpriced Blue Link and opted to install my own remote.
In all cases, the engine would die it the brake pedal is pushed with no key.
In some towns around here you have to have your doors locked if the car is running unattended. That is the result of stolen cars where idiots would run out and start the car and leave the keys in it.
When I park the car at night I put the defroster on and the seat heater switch. Five minutes or so makes a nice head start.
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Where I was, it was illegal to have a car running, unattended, at any time. AIUI, the law was designed to keep tractor-trailers from running their engines all night but it was enforced against cars, too, though not often in residential areas, in front of people's homes.

I don't believe I've ever had a car where the window heaters weren't momentary buttons. I've never had seat heaters. I guess my wife's car does now but it'll never be used. ;-)
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On 1/1/2014 1:10 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Front defrost can be set, but the rear defrost is a momentary button so it cannot be set. I understand that some more costly remotes can be used to turn on secondary accessories. Some will even report back the internal temperature.
Seats vary. I've had different switches on the last three Sonatas I've had. The '07 and '13 will stay set, but the '10 had momentary switches. n this one the rear seat heaters can alxo be set to stay on, but I'd not do that.
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They probably tie into the CAN. Seems possible, though it would require software for each car. Seems like a scary thing to do, too.

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In every car I've ever had, the heater controls stay set to the last settings used when the car is shut off...other than the rear defroster, that is.
We try to remember to turn the defrosters on and set the fans to high before we shut down for the night. I usually remember to do/check it when we take the dogs for their last walk of the night.
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On 12/31/2013 7:05 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

In the road salt parts of the world, it's necessary to lube the door locks at least a couple times a year. WD-40 is better than nothing. I like Castle Thrust, or a syringe and some 10w30 motor oil.
When I used to work in a locksmith shop in the city, we'd replace door lock cylinders for people. The salt turns them into a lump of zinc and copper. And salt.
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On 12/31/2013 12:17 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I hope that includes an acceptable mounting device/storage area. :-)
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Doesn't that limit your choices of vehicles? Many vehicles do not have room to store a full size spare. Or do you give up the room required to store it outside of the built-in storage location?
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wrote:

I did that with my '01 Ranger. I specifically bought the "full sized spare" option. "Full sized" meant that it was a 15" tire on a 15" (steel) wheel, even though the truck had 16" aluminum wheels. IIRC, the tires were 235R16s with the spare being a 215R15. It never came off the tire sling.
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I met up with my brother on the road trip that I rented the car for. When the tire went low he lent me the portable air compressor he carries. It's just like the kit you described. You can use it to top off a tire with air, or you can hook up a different hose and put the included "slime" in the tire if it's flat.
His van has a spare, but he carries the kit just in case. All he's ever needed was the pump, but he's got the sealant if need be.
Regarding the "trunk storage", the donut for my Odyssey is stored inside the vehicle, under the floor mat behind the front seats. I've had vans where the spare hangs from the bottom the vehicle on a cable. That just sucks.
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on the road, if you damage a sidewall or cut the tire, or damage the rim, or don't get stopped before the tire carcase is damaged. Also useless if a valve stem is damaged ( 3 of the last 4 flat's I've had would have been more than a match for a "repair kit" - and the other I repaired on the car with a plug.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Since it's not the same exact rating as the OEM tires it will not perform the same way. The warning is to cover their own ass in case you lose control of the car by going too fast.
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What did the rental agency say when you asked?
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