OT - Electric Shocks From Shopping Carts

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On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 12:18:54 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

No, your family will use your card so they can buy a nice urn for your ashes. Aisle 4 near the end.
They can use the express lane because all they are buying is the urn and a big box of Bubba Burgers for after the funeral service.
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Yeah, I've had that happen too, but I think the carts with the flats on the wheels are more annoying. Pushing a cart that goes "bang bang bang bang bang..." is more annoying than electric shocks.
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Davej wrote:

I hate the unoiled squeeky wheel bearings, or the too tight dry ones which make the cart want to turn when you push it.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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In article

I've had issues like this in the past.
After time and observation, I noticed it seemed to happen much more when I was wearing one particular pair of shoes.
One supermarket was a real issue... I had to stay grounded to metal of the the cart, then before touching anything else, had to bring the cart into contact with the metal shelf bottom. If I'd walked any distance, up to maybe a 3/16" spark would sometimes be visible between cart & shelf.
Also received wicked shocks getting out of the car with that pair of shoes, especially in the Winter.
As a side note, most car tires now have a little carbon blended into the rubber to help bleed off static charges. (Don't know for sure, but suspect they may do the same with shoe sole materials.) Seat covering and clothing materials also play a factor.
If walking around in an area where you know you may get a static shock, hold your keys (or other metal object) in your hand, and touch the car lock first with the key/object to minimize shock. In the house touch the key/object to a switch plate screw, or whatever else thats handy and well grounded. (Try to avoid zapping your computer!)
Erik
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On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 19:35:03 -0700, Erik wrote:

Showing my age, but anti-static straps used to be a common accessory for a car. Don't know how well they worked.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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I'll really show my age.
I worked for the IT department of a major company and spent a couple of years installing countless Radio Shack TRS-80 word processors. The static electricity issues with these machines were notorious for wiping out the data on the 8" floppies.
I recall one system where you could walk up, touch the plastic case of the keyboard and the daisy wheel printer would spit out a character.
In the worst locations we would attach grounding straps to the sprinkler system with a wrist strap for the users to put on before they sat down to use the machine.
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On Thu, 13 Sep 2012 08:59:58 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
Did you ever get a BJ at BJ's?
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