Orangeburg pipe repair

Hi-
I have Orangeburg pipe (i.e. asphalt coated cardboard) going from my house to my septic system and there is a small hole (~1.5" diameter) in the top of the pipe through which stinky sewer gases are escaping. I've called a few plumbers about coming to repair this and none of them seem to want to do the job. More then one plumber told me I can easily fix it myself by getting an orangeburg repair kit. They have said this is a like a collar that comes in 2 pieces that clamps around the pipe. You dig it out, fit the collar around and tighten it. They said it's available at any plumbing supply store.
Well, I've been to 4 plumbing supply stores and they have no idea what I'm talking about. I've searched on the net, and I have not found anything like this.
So does anyone know if such a repair kit exists and if so where I could get one. If not, is there an alternate method I could use to repair the hole in this pipe?
Thanks! -larry
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i'd be tempted to use an old car inner tube and a couple of large hose clamps.
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Along those lines, you can buy a heavy rubber kit with a couple of large hose clamps to go around it. It should last 10 or 20 years on a sewer line. Ed
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Thanks to all who replied and offered solutions. I think initially I will try this and see if it holds. Now I just need to find a heavy rubber kit somewhere ...
-larry
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wrote in message

Fernco makes a rubber coupler fitting that fits on orangeburg pipe on one end and abs on the other. You can cut a section of the orangeburg out with a sawsall and use a piece of abs in the middle. You slide the couplers on to the abs and set it in where you cut out the piece of orangeburg and then slide the couplers onto the orangeburg and tighten the bands on the couplers.
CR
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Larry Martell wrote:

I found a heavy piece of rubber, and I cemented it in place with roofing cement, then used 4 hose clamps. It looks like it's holding.
-larry
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Good for you. Thanks for getting back with the solution.
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Larry Martell wrote:

The best repair for orangeburg pipe is total replacment of the entire line. Until such time you could wrap tar paper around it, followed by cement.
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could fix it using the same materials or better yet a square of tar paper and some waterproof roofing adhesive.
This might work if the pipe is not pressurized (and it is not since water is not gushing out of the hole). But be aware the pipe may become pressurized if it fills with water after haevy rains or heavy use. At this time, your repair may come off in a spectacular S--t Fountain which we will want to hear about.
If it is pressurized, you need to find a more secure fix. I have seen similar repair kits but for metal pipes and they are often called "saddle clamps". What is the diameter of the Orangeberg pipe. Does it seem rigid enough to clamp without crushing.
Tell the guy at the hardware store you want to repair a hole in a pipe of whatever diameter and leave out the orangeberg.
If worse comes to worse you will need to cut out the damaged section and use a "No Hub" connector to join the two sections. This is just a rubber cylinder with clamps on each end of the correct diameter. If the cut is long, use ABS pipe to span the break and no hub connectors to join the dissimilar materials.
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PipeDown wrote:

Here's a good link with more then you ever wanted to know about Orangeburg pipe:
http://www.sewerhistory.org/grfx/components/pipe-orng1.htm
-larry
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I had two houses with that stuff. Tried patching the first time. Worked for a few months then it failed again. Patched again. Failed again. Then I got a plumber and a backhoe. I screamed at the cost but no more problems. I mentioned it when I sold the home and the buyers became more interested in the property.
Orangeburg has not been installed here abouts since the mid 1960's
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Larry Martell posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

--

Tekkie


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