Oldham Septic Tanks

I am looking at purchasing a house with a non-working Oldham septic tank in Southwest Ohio. A health inspection report says that the motor is missing. My basic question is generally how long the septic tank should last. I am worried that I could get the current problem repaired and then have a serious problem down the road. This house was repossessed, so the bank is no help with what is going on. If the whole thing needs to be replaced I would simply reduce my purchase price by the cost of the replacement, which I understand is about $15-$20,000 to install a new system. I would appreciate any comments about the durability of this system, and whether I should insist that it be replaced.
Thanks,
JD
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You should insist that the septic be repaired before purchasing. But I doubt the bank will budge, foreclosures typically are "as is".
Rich http://www.garage-door-hardware.com

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<< I am looking at purchasing a house with a non-working Oldham septic tank in Southwest Ohio >>
The common sense business approach to this problem is to have a professional appraiser (preferably one your bank knows) come up with a dollar figure for the house. Assume that the septic system is history and get a firm estimate for replacement. Give this figure to your appraiser. The price will now be something realistically close to the absolute top the bank can expect. Subtract the appraisal cost. Now subtract roughly 5% from this figure for all the aggravation and make that your firm offer to the bank. Don't budge for any reason whatsoever. Remember that a crippled septic system in a repo house is likely to be only one of all the possible problems with the dwelling. In the automotive world, when people stop paying on their cars, the vehicle will be wholesaled by any dealer because they know from bitter experience that it is now a hurt asset. The bank wants to recover as much of the foreclosed mortgage as they can, of course, so if you lay all your cards on the table and they say no, just wait a while. Odds are thay can't unload it and it will be yours. Good luck.
Joe
Joe
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I saw an aeration tank being run from a Pontiac Firebird AIR pump on a belt drive from a fractional-horse motor. Worked fine, gave good aeration, and was not an overpriced proprietary unit.

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