Older craftsman chainsaw fuel line keeps popping off...

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Any suggestions on how to either: keep the fuel line (gas tank side) from falling off (crazy glue around the outside?), or how to get my hands on a new line?
Thanks.
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I'm assuming the fuel line is the same as the chain saw I use, and most small engines.
Check with a local motorcycle shop or boat marina garage for a mini hose clamp used on motorcycle, ATV, dirt bike, snowmobile and outboard boat engine fuel lines. It's a spring-looking clamp with tabs you compress with pliers to open. Slide it into place, let go with the pliers and the spring tension holds the fuel line to the nipple. Shouldn't cost more than a dollar. They'll have new fuel line also, though that could cost as much as three dollars <g>
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As Dan says, they all use the same type of lines, just different sizes depending on the size of the saw. Any small engine repair shop will have replacement line.
A really cheap alternative to the "store-bought" clamp is to simply take some small gauge wire and make a clamp by wrapping a turn around it and twist the ends with a pair of pliers...
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You're giving your age away! :-/
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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And/Or the farm-fix heritage... :)
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If you twist to much and break the wire - cut another piece.
I was a young kid when told why they put water into tractor tires. I'm no farmer, but have some heritage..
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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The fuel line goes soft with constant exposure to gas and oil. For less than $2 you can purchase a new fuel line, from most small engine repair shops. You will get many more years of trouble free use, without the use of clamps or wire. Both of which will get you out of a bind, however for a fix, replace the line.

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wrote:

What keeps the line from popping off without clamps or wire? Especially after the line is weak?
You don't mean the glue idea from the OP, right?
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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Nothing keeps the line from popping off when it is weak. You would have to use some sort of clamp or wire. I think however that this is an emergency patch job which may be needed in a pinch. A new proper size fuel line will fit snug and it would be unlikely to pop off.

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wrote:

So the oil and fuel has no bearing; in your thoughts.
You will not get good best result without a clamp or wire.
Would the line stay on for a few minutes, maybe!
The OP wants to stop it from popping off. (I cannot tell from here if he is fifty feet up a tree, if so we send him up another saw).
The snug fit won't last. -- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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I was asked for an opinion. I gave it. I will not be lured into a pissing contest with you or any one else. Sorry to spoil your fun.

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wrote:

It's not a contest, just like me giving my opinion. The OP did not declare an emergency; only asking for a way to stop the line from popping off.
And how do you think you can spoil my fun?
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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Don't often disagree w/ you Oren, but will side w/ jacko on this one. Most don't rely on a clamp and will last for years before the line will relax. Don't think it is oil or gas that's the primary culprit in causing them to fail, either--after all, it _is_ a gas line designed to handle 2-cycle gas/oil mixture. Primarily imo opnion they fail from heat and age, much of which is correlated I believe w/ UV exposure. There's undoubtedly a component of fuel contact but I think it's by far a lesser effect. I'd expect a new line to last at least 4-5 years -- first had to replace the one on the old chainsaw here last year and that saw is nearly 20 years old.
Of course, to OP, while you're at it you might consider picking up a new pickup tank filter if this saw is old enough the line is going -- can't hurt and might just help the way it runs...
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I really have no issue with other comments.
If snug fits in this case and you have enough line - snip half inch off and fit the hose. The swollen end is cut off a bit to fit tighter.
In that case the OP can cut the line and snug 'er up.

Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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That's a short term fix that can serve as a temporary workaround, but none I have have extra length so that the shorter one won't reach to bottom of tank. That, of course, is only a minor inconvenience as compared to not being able to keep the saw running at all... :)
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The best answer then is a new fuel line . Given fuel cost I don't want that line popping off :)
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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Is there an Echo (pun intended) in here??? :)
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I'm not a mechanic, so take my comments at face value. I did grow up owning and working on quads, dirt bikes and outboard motors. In my experience it is true that a new line will fit snug and last quite some time. Still, we always used the clamps. If I can spend an extra dollar and extra few seconds in my driveway or on the dock to make the fix last twice as long I'm all in. It's better than being miles from home, in the woods or adrift in the river (or worse, rocking & rolling in the ocean) muttering about how you should have fixed it right the first time with a #!@$% clamp while trying to jury-rig the line with fishing line and a pocket knife. In the same spirit, we always leave the line as long as possible while still being neat, usually getting an extra couple inches. In a pinch the extra couple inches & the clamp may get you home.
With a chain saw you won't be stranded if/when it fails, but I'd still prefer my fix to last as long as possible. This said, I'd replace the line (including an extra inch or two if practical) and add clamps. The peace of mind is worth the dollar or two it will cost.
Good looks to Oren for mentioning snipping off a bit. I've done that to get by in a pinch in the past and didn't think to mention it here.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Can't really argue w/ the logic, particularly for motorized vehicles the risks are much higher than simply a little inconvenience or perhaps worst scenario some lost revenue if one's a professional woodcutter, for example.
But, all the trimmers, chainsaws and the like I currently have (and, counting I come up w/ ...let's see, that's five I think is all) came from the manufacturer w/ no clamp and at least a couple have very little room for one. I think all are at least 10 years old and some are at least 20 (inherited from Dad) and I've only had the one line on the oldest chainsaw need replacing since I came back after six or seven years additional use on my part. Granted, of course, this is pretty infrequent use, but my experience for these small engines is that the manufacturers didn't use the clamp simply because it really isn't needed until time the line needs replacing anyway.
Again, for a bike or a boat or even a lawnmower I'll agree w/ you I'd not consider doing without. Part of the reason, of course is they typically have much larger lines than the miniatures on the really small 2-cycle engines. Wouldn't surprise me that larger chainsaws come factory equipped w/ clamps as well.
Extra line almost never is a problem on larger engines, either, of course. On at least one of the chainsaws I have, more than an extra 1/4" doesn't work because the direction it runs causes it to buckle and pinch it closed. (DAMHIKT :) (or how long it took to find the _obvious_ cause :( )
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