O.T. somewhat Old Chime /Clock Door Bell Repair


I have a 55 year old door chime clock and the board has carbon arcs which is causing a short. I have seen boards with this problem before and they were repaired using some type of filler. The filler I have seen has always been white if this helps. I tried Google to see what is used. Does someone on the group know?
Thank you for your help
Chris
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Can you scrape off the carbonized material and just coat what remains with clear nail polish?
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wrote:

A filler needs to be used and then re-solder the four contact points.
Chris
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Or glue a strip of teflon.(good insulaion)
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wrote:

What is a door chime clock?

Plastic wood? It's not white but it might be more like the wood that is there?

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It is a door bell A nutone k46. They have not made them since the mid 90's and you can no longer get parts. They were the rage back in the mid '50s when they came out.
Chris
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On Wed, 04 Nov 2009 14:18:23 -0500, Chris wrote:

http://www.knockdoorbells.com/advice_clocks.htm
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Chris wrote:

I don't think I ever saw one but I'd love to get just a plain door chime with 4 or 5 chimes and they ring a short song. Well I love to get one if it were cheap anyway.
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-snip-

how cheap? this one's only $50- and it is programmable, but has >100 songs in it already. http://www.musicaldoorbell.com /
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

No thanks, I want real chimes. The long metal tube type.
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Tony wrote:

Hi, Mine has 5 tubes and it is played by motor driven rotating plunger/hammer. 3 tunes, front, back, side door. My only problem has been plunger spring sticking. I had it more than 30 years and always took it when moving.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Cool. I've worked on regular door bells (chimes) with the solenoid and plunger that hits the chime. In a way are a lot like solenoids in pinball machines (I fixed them for close to 30 years). Anyway, if you take apart the sticky unit and clean it well, don't give it _any_ lubrication and it should work for a long time. If the solenoid has an aluminum sleeve, well they just suck. If it's brass it's a lot better, and if it's nylon it's better yet.
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those are expensive, if you haven't already figured it out (I've been keeping an eye out on eBay for a cheap one, but they always seem to go for $150 or more.)
nate
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wrote:

I haven't seen them but I've heard them, live, going back 40 years, that play, dum, dum, doom, dum; doom, dum, dum, doom. (I'm not sure my representation is very good. I'm tone deaf so I can't give you notes from a scale.) That's at the front door. AT the back door they just play the first four sounds.
These are real chimes, not electronic sounds. There are between 2 and 4 pitches required.
I think it could get annoying if you have a lot of visitors, that it has to play 8 notes every time.
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mm wrote:

you mean Westminster chimes?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westminster_Quarters
requires four bells - and I'm not sure I'd want it as a doorbell unless I was sure that I'd never have a chiming clock, otherwise things could get confusing :)
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

I've only been to Westminster, Maryland, so I'm not sure.

Listening to the midi file here at least some of them were that, and the midi file reminds me that that sequence is 16 tone. No wonder I found it annoying, and I was just visiting the house.
It seems to me the page wasn't written entriely by a native English speaker. At least not American English. It says in part:
The permutationen are:
1. g4, f?4, e4, b3 2. e4, g?4, f?4, b3 3. e4, f?4, g?4, e4 4. g4, e4, f?4, b3 5. b3, f?4, g?4, e4
played as three crotchets and a dotted minim. A different sequence of these permutations is played at each quarter-hour: one set at the first quarter, two sets at the half, and so forth, as follows:

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Chris wrote:

I've worked on similar units in pinball machines and I *think* I can picture exactly what you have. After removing all the carbonized areas, I've used epoxy or bondo, put tape on the back and fill in the void. I've fixed some that were so bad that after epoxy, I had to drill out and install the old, or new brass rivets that make contact with the wiper fingers. Then of course the wires have to be soldered back onto the rivets.
Never ever ever ever use contact cleaner on it. For some reason it will cause the carbon arc to form. I've seen it literally 100's of times. Clean it with light oil on a cloth and leave some oil on it or give it a light coat of lubriplate (actually almost any light grease will do) Just stay away from the contact cleaner. If grease on electrical contacts doesn't sound quite right, well it didn't sound right to me either 30 years ago when I first saw it. It works great reducing friction wear and also helps keep the contacts from pitting.
Note: this is only for contacts with wiper fingers, relay type contacts get filed clean and they never get grease/oil and again never use contact cleaner. I honestly don't know what contact cleaner is good for?
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