Need your advice on a good inside automotive tire patch

Page 10 of 13  
Tekkie® wrote, on Thu, 10 Dec 2015 17:19:10 -0500:

I know this was directed at someone else, but, let's remind ourselves this isn't the ladies' knitting group.
We're here to learn how to repair things, and, in this case, what we want to learn is the proper way for a homeowner to repair a car tire that has a puncture wound.
So far, we have learned a *lot* (at least "I" have), as I have read the wrong way and the right way to repair the tires.
The only thing I don't have are the 5 tools and the 3 fluids, so, my quest right now is simply to find homeowner-style alternatives.
One could rightly say just buy the right tools & fluids, but, you have to realize that we're only going to repair one tire every few years, so, we really need to be smarter than that.
Sure, it's *easy* to buy exactly the professional tools, but, if we're smart, we can buy the fluids and tools and be able to use them for other things.
For example, of the three fluids, we seem to know at this point: 1. Pre-buff solvent <= seems to either be Naptha or MEK 2. Vulcanizing cement <= easy to come by almost anywhere 3. Inner liner sealer <= this we don't know what it's made of yet
Of the 5 tools, we can probably make use of existing tools: a. Carbide reamer b. Pre-buff half-moon scraper c. Half-round buffing wheel d. Stitcher wheel
If you know of alternative sources in the home box office for any of these tools and fluids, that's the stage I'm currently at now.
Whatever you impart will benefit all of us, because I would expect anyone at home who can mount and dismount and balance a tire to be able to also patch the repair from the inside.
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On 12/10/2015 8:07 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Another path would be to approach this from the side of social engineering. Rather than a gallon of each for one tire patch, you might cultivate a local tire shop (or tractor supply or such), do your path with him at the end of the day using his tools and supplies/materials and leave a crisp $50. If your goal is education, start with someone who knows the area and is nearby for advice as you go along.
--
Andrew Muzi
<www.yellowjersey.org/>
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AMuzi wrote, on Fri, 11 Dec 2015 08:19:47 -0600:

That would work, but, I'm gonna take the "homeowner" route.
That is, I know how badly most homeowners do it (they buy the $5 string-plug kit, shove the thing in with glue, twist, pull out, and cut.
So, "my" repair can't be as bad as that typical homeowner repair, no matter *what* I do!
I already bought a few tools, most important of which is the rasp and the stitcher, so, I'm fine with respect to tools (the scraper and buffer are pretty much finesse - remember - compared to the "typical" homeowner job).
The one tool I pine for is the carbide reamer. I think what I will do is look for a carbide reamer in the box stores. I might even break the handle off of the hand reamers, and put that "bit" into the drill at 500 RPM to see if that works.
Once I have the carbide reamer, that's all I really need. So, here's the shortcut to a "decent" repair:
1. buff the inside 2. ream with a carbide bit 3. glue in the patchplug
The one solution that really has no decent alternative yet is the final covering of the rubberized carbon-black naptha.
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Danny D. posted for all of us...

Snipped because I'm tired of seeing the same reply to posts. It was directe d at you. As others have said there are some things others should do. If you REALLY wanted to know how to do it you would have DAGS. Education is not free. The uneducated have to pay the price. You are paying nothing but replying with snarky knitting group answers. Grow up. The world doesn't exist just for you. You are on the same plane as Stumped.
--
Tekkie

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Tekkie® wrote, on Sat, 12 Dec 2015 16:53:22 -0500:

This is wrong. Dead wrong. But you're entitled to your opinion. If you don't know how to do it, you don't really need to respond anyway. I'll learn from the guys who *do* know how to do the job right anyway.
If you think for a split second that the guy who repairs your tires gives a hoot about your safety, you're dead wrong.
They're just trying to get "stuff" through their shop. That's it. To them, you're just another 'job'.
The proof is that *every* time I watch them, I see them make mistake after mistake after mistake after mistake (some of which has already been reported).
The ancient adage still holds, despite the fact you seem to think it doesn't hold true.
If you want the job done right - do it yourself.
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Oren wrote, on Sat, 12 Dec 2015 18:38:56 -0800:

Thanks for being on my support team! :)
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On Sun, 13 Dec 2015 01:36:10 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

How many times have you read "don't support the calipers with the hose." Yet I've seen them do this at shop after shop.
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wrote:

Ashton is about the only guy cheaper and less intelligent than DannyBoy on this group. I plonked him a long time ago so only see his crap when someone answers him.
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clare wrote, on Thu, 10 Dec 2015 21:15:03 -0500:

Did you ever have tires mounted or an alignment and you watched the "professional" do the job all wrong?
I have.
So, at the very least, we all should know how this plugpatch job is done correctly. If for no other reason, than to be intelligent when we watch someone else do the repair, so that we know if *they* did the job right.
At the moment, I think we all know *exactly* how to do the repair properly (following the well-established RMA procedures).
We also know exactly what 5 tools and 3 chemicals to use.
The *only* thing left is to see if we can intelligently second source any of the 5 tools and 3 chemicals so that we can use them for other purposes around the home and car.
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2015 02:44:31 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Clare thinks he's the only one who knows anything or is entitled to an opinion. Whenever someone else says anything outside his experience base or different then he (or she) believes, his (or her) panties get in a bunch and he (or she) starts tossing around insults.
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Ashton Crusher wrote, on Sat, 12 Dec 2015 16:47:46 -0700:

It's ok with me as long as I learn something.
Clare, for example, corrected that the pre-buff fluid is Naptha, and not MEK (which I confirmed with an MSDS). It's 100% naptha, which is easy to come by for homeowners.
The only fluid I don't think I'll find in the box stores is the black tar goop, which, from the MSDS, isn't anything special.
It's just a coating of rubberized dried petroleum. But, it's not easy to find so far in the box stores.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Yeah, I'm getting Stumpy flashbacks. I gotta chill out and just read the crap for amusement purposes only.
--
Tekkie

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Vic Smith wrote, on Wed, 09 Dec 2015 03:47:08 -0600:

Most of the tire repair videos do *not* use the dimpled scraper that most of us use to repair a tire.
They pour what turns out to be MEK onto the inner liner, which, presumably, dissolves some of the inner liner, and then they scrape with this tool:
http://www.grainger.com/product/XTRA-SEAL-Inner-Liner-Scraper-33K072 http://www.walmart.com/ip/XTRA-SEAL-14-315H-Inner-Liner-Scraper-Tire-Repair-Tool-G4874974/40883102
After they scrape, they do "grind" the scraped area also.
They seem to prefer very low speeds when grinding, like 500rpm and never more than 5,000 RPM.
Is that for heat reasons?
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2015 18:22:36 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Beats me. They probably don't know either. You can generate plenty of heat at 500 rpm. Like I said, if I ever get a screw or nail in a tire, I'll just get a plug kit. Or take it to a nearby Just Tires. Done that too. If I can't find a puncture, I assume it's a rim leak. But one time they found a nail I had missed.
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Vic Smith wrote:

Tires are most important parts of vehicle, each maintaining firm contact with surface supporting the vehicle. Each contact area is mere sq. inches. For me, I don't want to play with damaged tire(s). I don't want to put myself and family for possible danger due to so called repaired tire. My driving is mostly freeway driving doing 70 mph or so. It all takes is just one accident. Even new tires can cause an accident. I don't want to learn a lesson paying my life.
In Germany cops can impound your car if you are driving with worn tire(s). It's pretty scary driving on Autobahn first time.
Danny D. tire repair Guru!!! Good luck driving your Bimmer on patched tire(s).
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wrote:

+100 If he won't listen to me, mabee he'll listen to someone else. He asks for advice - then won't take it. That sounds a bit like an idiot to me - sorry but I have to call a spade a spade.
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clare wrote, on Thu, 10 Dec 2015 17:22:36 -0500:

I think you totally missed the point. The tire is already ruined because I drove on it. Nothing I do to it will ruin it any more.
However, I can experiment on this tire, so that I can see how the entire patch process works.
Remember what this group is all about. It's not a ladies' knitting group you know.
So, we're not afraid to wind our own garage door springs. We're not afraid to replace our own struts. And, we're not afraid to patch our tires correctly.
You seem to know a lot, which means that you know the average fool is too stupid to patch their tires correctly.
But, the rest of us aren't average fools! (pun intended).
At this point, I'm working on *what* exactly the carbide bit does. This bit looks nothing like the spiral reamer that comes with the el cheapo outside plug kits.
The carbide bit, I think, is supposed to smooth the sharp edges of the cut belts.
Do you concur? Or is there a *different* reason for the carbide bit?
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2015 01:52:07 -0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

It is to clean/debride the inside of the puncture to allow the patch to vulcanize properly as well as handling the steel belts. HOWEVER- there are many punctures that do not break the steel cord - and then using a carbide to "cut" the cord is counterproductive.
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clare wrote, on Thu, 10 Dec 2015 21:25:27 -0500:

Hmmmmmmm.... that's interesting.
How can a puncture *not* break the steel cord?
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Vic Smith wrote, on Thu, 10 Dec 2015 12:44:01 -0600:

The point here is to learn.
It's sort of like a biology lab.
Nobody forces you to cut open a pig, but, we all cut open pigs and frogs and shrarks to study them.
That's sort of why I'm doing this. (The tire is ruined already anyway, because I drove on it for about a mile, assuming, wrongly, that it still had enough air.)
Today I went to a few shops but I had to do other errands.
So far I've second sourced the first two of the three fluids. 1. Inner liner solvent <=== MEK paint thinner 2. Patchplug vulcanizing cement <=== available everywhere 3. Inner liner sealer <=== need to find a source for this tar
I was gonna go to Harbor Freight to see if they have the carbide bit, which is, I think, the most critical tool for doing the job right.
Apparently the carbide bit is to smooth the broken steel belts. Am I correct in that being the purpose of the fluted carbide bit?
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