Need chain for chain hoist.....

I bought a ratcheting chain hoise at an auction, which works, but came without the chain. The chain is supposed to enter one hole and exit the other. There is a sprocket inside that apparently advances the chain one link per tooth on that sprocket. Even though chain is costly, I got that thing really cheap, so it's worth fixing. The question is how to determine the chain link size????? Do they all have the same size chain, or are all brands different? Maybe I'll have to try and locate the manufacturer for the specs, but I find more and more companies just totally ignore emails these days, and put the person on hold forever when you call them.
Anyone familiar with these things and the chain size?
Thanks
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 03:11:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote Re Need chain for chain hoist.....:

Take the hoist to a hardware store that sells chain and try feeding some chain into the hoist. See which size fits best.
Assuming you find a correct size, how will you join the two ends after you thread it through the hoist? Will a chain link fit through the hoist?
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Guess that is a good idea to take it to hardware store. The 2 ends dont need to be attached. This is a ratcheting hoist, sort of like a huge comealong. One end gets a hook, the other ends needs some sort of stop such as a large bolt or just another hook.
Thanks for the help
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On 4/19/2012 7:34 AM, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

It should have a load rating; that'll tell you the chain rating you need.
Note you'll want rated chain for overhead lifting.
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Your best bet would be to contact the manufacturer. The sizes on these vary with capacity and some use a proprietary size and link shape rather than a standard chain size. Even if you identify the correct chain size, you still need to know the minimum grade useable for the lifting capacity and configuration of that particular hoist.
If you can't get info from the manufacturer, and really want to pursue it, try taking it to an industrial supplier where you can try different sizes out, then purchase something like grade 80 alloy chain in the size that works.
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On 4/19/2012 3:11 AM, snipped-for-privacy@toyotamail.com wrote:

The last ratcheting chain hoist I had was a Yale brand and the chain looked much like an oversized motorcycle chain. The problem with looking for a replacement chain for a conventional type chain hoist at a typical hardware store is the certified load rating of the chain. If you are serious about safety, the best chain to use is one meant for use in a hoist. The best source for a replacement chain may be a supplier like W.W. Grainger or Ace Industries.
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/lever-chain-hoists/hoist-winch-and-rigging/material-handling/ecatalog/N-9sf
http://tinyurl.com/7gmaqmv
http://www.aceindustries.com/c-24-hoist-all-models.aspx?Filter =[EntityIDs=%%2870%29%*Sort=5*ava=0]#Filter=[pagenum=1*EntityIDs=@%2870%29@*Sort=5*ava=0]
http://tinyurl.com/89yrxaf
TDD
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