Name of plug in US

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On 4/30/2011 2:42 PM, John Fields wrote:

I've also heard them called "British Naval Connectors".
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

In England some people joke that it stands for "Brand New Connector" and the later TNC stands for "Terribly New Connector". :-)
Geoff
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On 4/30/2011 4:34 PM, Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

I first wrote "Navel" but changed it when I figured no one might get the joke. ^_^
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"Geoffrey S. Mendelson"

** I was once told it stood for " Bloody Nice Connector " .......
.... Phil
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mm wrote:

I once had a salesman tell me it simply means "Bayonet Connector"; presumably the BN is BayoNet, as in TTY for TeleTYpe. :-)
Cheers! Rich
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Stephen wrote:

Not in the US. They were called PAL connectors because only PAL TV sets and VCR's used them. They were only sold in shops which catered to foreign tourists, Indians and saliors. All three of which bought them in the US because of the low taxes and then took or sent them "home".
Over the years I've referred to F connecters as NTSC connectors when someone called the Belling-Lee ones PAL connectors, but no one got the joke. :-(
Geoff.
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I can assure you that PAL refers to an analogue broadcast standard. What the Americans call a "PAL connector" is really strictly speaking a Belling Lee.
It sounds like "PAL connector has become everyday language in USA, just like "Hoover" or "Xerox" whereas strictly speakign they are vacuum cleaner and photocopier respectively.
Here in Great Britain, the F- connector is used for connecting satellite dishes to the recievers or by the cable TV networks.
I persoanlly prefer F connector to Belling Lee as the latter can easily fall out of the socket whereas F connectors dont.
Stephen.

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wrote:

No one doubts that. It's also a DVD standard too iiuc.

I think it can be two things at the same time, and it's hard to be just a Belling Lee when I for one had never heard of such a thing. I'm sure that's true of many people who sell them in the US too.

Hoover means vacuum cleaner in some other countries, but in the US it's just another brand. Gerber means baby food in general some places.

Xerox does indeed mean photocopy here. I think a small part of my jaunt in law school dealt with trademarks, but I've always thought the rule was backwards from what it should be. If people use xerox as a synonym for photocopy, that should strengthen the trademark and not weaken it. Then the Xerox company, or the Scotch tape company wouldn't have to waste their efforts defending their name, except in advertising for another brand.
But when someone actually uses a Xerox machine or real Scotch tape, making them call it Scotch brand tape or Xerox brand photocopying seems silly.
And if someone on the news, for example, said the company released a xerox of some document, just assume they used a real Xerox machine or something living up to its standards.
Just my rant.

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http://rfshop.com.au/Store/tabid/63/List/1/CategoryID/2/Category2ID/55/Category3/other/Level/3/ProductID/2928/Default.aspx
BTW, it's being sold in Australia... not USA.
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2011 22:13:41 +0800, Man-wai Chang

There is more to this world than Amazon.
Try Nile.com or Mississippi.com.
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Man-wai Chang wrote:

In the US they are called PAL connectors.
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId !03468
Geoff.
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2011 21:29:04 +0000 (UTC), "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"

Officially, on both sides of the pond, they are referred to as IEC 169-2, or IEC 60169-2 connectors, and they are CRAP for TV usage as they are not a proper match to 75 ohm cable - actually closer to 50 ohm, and cause reflections and ghosting of the signal
The IEC 169-24, or "F" connector is superior for TV use.
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2011 19:39:47 +0800, Man-wai Chang
Belling-Lee connector or IEC 169-2 connector <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TV_aerial_plug>

Belling-Lee connetors are not used in the USA. We use F connectors and RCA connectors for TV RF: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F_connector> However, not all the F connector plugs are threaded as in "quick connect" or "push on" connectors that simply slide over the threads.
Adapters are available: <http://www.dealextreme.com/p/belling-lee-pal-tv-antenna-plug-to-f-cable-connectors-2-pack-18356
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wrote:

At least someone got helped!

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wrote:

Y'er welcome. I had never heard of Belling-Lee connectors until some friends arrived from UK with "universal" AM/FM/TV/SW contrivance that did PAL, NTSC, and SECAM all in one box. I wanted to see how well it worked, but when I tried to plug in a test cable, I couldn't find a connector that would fit. The manual was useless. The local shopping mall travel store was helpful. They allowed me to dig through their collection of connectors, where I found one as part of a very expensive adapter kit. A few photos and a dumb question in one of the travel forums generated the necessary info. However, I didn't want to wait for an adapter, so I made my own from some brass tubing and an F connector.
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

>(Amazon.com product link shortened)04163450&sr=8-10
The push on connectors were the 'G' series, and designed to be matable with the 'F' series. Most places selling them are absolutely clueless, like selling DE9 connectors as DB9. Mass marketing to, for and by idiots. :(

<http://www.dealextreme.com/p/belling-lee-pal-tv-antenna-plug-to-f-cable-connectors-2-pack-18356
If you want real fun, try to buy a 'HN' connector over the counter at a wholesaler. ;-)
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2011 22:53:28 -0400, "Michael A. Terrell"

Not exactly. The "G" series was contrived to provide a connector suitable for passing up to 15A of current. The cable companies have always powered line amps from DC on the cable. That was fine with semi-rigid coax and compression connectors that could handle the current. However, when the amps shrank in size, a newer smaller connector was needed. That was the Type G connector. <http://www.amphenolrf.com/products/typeg.asp?N=0&sidMBB51003571617F&

Well, lets see what Google can offer. Searching for DE9, I get 70,100,000 hits, while DB9 returns 8,830,000 hits. So about 12% are clueless.
Actually, it should be DE9S or DE9P, but that's being picky.

<http://www.amphenolrf.com/products/hn.asp?N=0&sidMBB510041D4E17F& Hi-V. I've never seen or used one. There are plenty of other obscure connectors.
The RF industry is full of specialized connectors. There was one connector found on many wireless cards where I couldn't find a mating plug. It turned out that there wasn't a mating plug. It was a test connector with a conical entry. <
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/WG511.jpg
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Jeff Liebermann wrote:

The 'G' connector was mostly used on modules in CATV line amps and MATV headend modules to plug in band splitters, single channel strip amplifiers or other items. They had to make a very good connection, and there was no room to use something like a BNC connector. Not only did the connectors have to pass power to amplifier modules, they provided all the mechanical mounting for the modules. The final requirement was no RF leakage, even though there were no threads.

Do a search for "Small Computer Serial Interface" for another laugh. It gives over 70K hits but a few years ago it was over a half million, including the website of a college in their computer course. I emailed them to point out the bad information and was told that "That is an old page, and we don't update those."

It describes the shell size and number of possible contacts. The S or P tells which half. It would be rare to find someone who only carries one half, wouldn't it? :)

RCA used them in their TV transmitters. I had a couple new, Amphenol still in the bags I picked up surplus when I worked in Broadcasting.

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On Sun, 1 May 2011 14:18:38 -0700 (PDT), The Ghost in The Machine
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"We"???

What group of loons has enjoined you as their spokesman?
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John Fields wrote:

Roy and all his dirty, crack smoking sock puppets:
Roy J Quijano 415 E 151st St Bronx, NY 10455 (718) 292-1943
He's the reason for my current sigfile.
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