My Computer Changed The TIme By Itself

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My computer is telling the correct hourly time. Is it because the new rules for changing our clocks happened to give the same day as if we followed the old rules? Or, did one of the Microsoft Windows XP updates put some new intelligence into my machine?
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On Sun, 4 Nov 2012 11:08:27 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Do you have Intenet? If so, double click on the Time in the lower right corner, and then click on the Internet Time tab. Do you have the box checked? If so, that does it. Yes, it's built in to XP for years now, from the beginning I thought, but wasn't in winME or 98, though there was freeware etc. that would do it with those OSes.
I have a Philips DVDR, now sold under the Magnavox brand, which does a very nice job in many ways but the clock can lose a minute or two a week, and so can the one my friend bought. Putting it on automatic time set doesn't make things better. But last night and last spring, it automatically updated the hour**, but failed to accurately set the minute! Isn't that amazing?
**When using an antenna only and not cable, etc. it does that by getting the time off of a tv station, usually PBS,
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On Sun, 4 Nov 2012 11:08:27 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Microsoft updates fixed that about 3 months after the change was put in place, if you allow Microsoft to update your computer. It's all part of the service packs.
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On 11/4/2012 1:08 PM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote: ...

yes
--


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Thanks to everyone for confirming what I suspected. The minute differs from the minute on my cellphone by about 10 seconds, that is truly amazing. I go back to when a long distance phone call meant shouting at top volume and then not always being able to hear the person at the other end , very late 1940's and very early 1950's.
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On Sun, 4 Nov 2012 13:20:30 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

I'm a few years younger than you, but I rememmber early and mid 50's when station-to-statioin was 20 cents a minute, after 8PM and on weekends,, and we all gathered around the phone to listen/talk to my grandmother, so she didn't have to say the same thing twice.
While NYC had dial phones then, until about 1955, we'd pick up the phone and the operator would say Number pleasssse. We'd give her the number** and I think we heard a ringing sound, unless it was busy, in which case the operator would come back and say "The line is bussssy".
**For the first few weeks or months in 1945, my mother would say "OLiver 4-1234, please", but eventually an operator said, "You don't have to say OLiver 4, Ma'am. They're all OLiver 4. "
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On 11/4/2012 7:20 PM, micky wrote:

On the farm in the 60's we got phone service from a private little rural phone company and we were on a party line. It was a hoot. ^_^
TDD
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On 11-04-2012 21:57, The Daring Dufas wrote:

On my parents' farm in the 1980s they had a party line.
--
Wes Groleau

Curmudgeon's Complaints on Courtesy:
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I remember in the 50's party lines were common in the suburbs. You had to count the rings. Then quietly pick up handset and listen in.
Greg
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wrote:

In '57 we moved to the INdianapolis suburbs. When my mother signed up for a phone, she was told she could have a party line with no one else on it. I guess they had planned for when there were more people in the area. So she saved money and it was like a private line for 9 years. till we moved.
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Talk about technology. I just picked up my old fashioned tone dial handset, by tapping on the hangup button on the wall, I called my cell phone. Is that cool.
I like the old phone, works without external power, and has loud bell. Also got loud bell in garage.
Greg
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Also realize that your computer has TWO clocks in it, the RTC (real time clock) which is like a wristwatch and uses a wristwatch type battery. The computer gets its time from this when you first turn it on.
But after it is on, the computer gets its time from the CPU. This second clock can run erratically, depending on how much load your computer is running. On this computer I'm using now, the clock runs fast when the computer is on. Windows normally automatically updates the clock once a week with the NIST.
Well, if I let my computer go a week it would be fast by about 2 to 3 minutes. So, I wrote a little script for the registry that changes the time update to every 6 hours. So, my computer is usually within half a second of accurate with the NIST at any given time.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Hi, Usual thing when you set the clock setting with DST enabled. Most of clocks in my house is atomic time based. My utility watch (Casjo Wave Center with solar cell) all know DST time setting back and forth. Our home thermostat does the same.
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Living in Indiana where is has only be the last few years where we started with Daylight time, for most computers the DST changeover is automatic. Remember when we started using DST one of the OS updates said that one the included changes was Indiana now observing DST. I was so proud (grin)
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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wrote:

I'm outraged. I've proudly told people how my former state ignores DST. Now I'll look like a fool to them.
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If it is any solace, we are now arguing about whether to switch from Eastern to Central.
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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wrote:

LOL. Indiana used to be in the Central time zone, in the early 50's and earlier, and they, or some of them, worked for years and years to get into the Eastern. Giving up DST was part of that, because it put them on the same time as Eastern for half of the year.
P&M
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On 11/05/2012 05:34 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Just get rid of Damn Stupid Time. It's nothing more than a mind game that adds to the confusion.
--
50 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM).

"The light of faith makes us see what we believe." -- St. Thomas Aquinas
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On 11/04/2012 06:23 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I see ads for clocks that claim to set themselves. They don't really, but will adapt to DST (change hour twice a year). Of course, they won't do anything about clock drift, so you still need to check occaisionally.
--
51 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:00:00 AM).

Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

There are so-called "atomic clocks" that do set themselves using a signal from a satellite. I have a small one that I got very cheaply at a hamfest, and after a year, I still haven't noticed if it works right or not, though it seems to keep good time. This morning it was no longer on DST. The problem is that when it is updating the time, it is supposed to display the image of radiation semi-circles coming from the image of an antenna, and when it does that, it stays that way for hours, when I can't imagine it takes more than ??? minutes to update the time.
They aren't really atomic, but the clock whose time they receive is probably atomic. Little known, the one at the US Naval Observatory in DC is open for tours one weeknight a week. iirc, along with being allowed to look through the telescope and one other thing I forget. I was there when Dan Quayle was living on the same property, and I hope the tours are still given.
The telescope will only see rather bright things, because it's located in the middle of NW DC, but there is also the U of Maryland telescope near College Park which is open for tours one day a month iirc, and the day of the week varies. Maybe it's the same day of each month. With their 2 telescopes, I was able to see Saturn and its rings for the first time (incredible) and two other planets and probably some stars IIRC both tours are free, though you should make a reservation and each is worth driving from Baltimore, let alone closer. At least on a clear night.
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