Common property door lock keeps getting changed by one of the unit owners

The problem is a common property balcony which can be used for BBQs etc which has a locked access door to prevent anyone other than the unit owners or renters from using it, having one of the unit owners keep getting the lock changed by a locksmith so that only he has a key and so is the only one that can use that area.
This must be a common problem. How to prevent one unit owner from getting a locksmith to lock everyone else out. Not feasible in a big city to notify all the locksmiths that they aren't allowed to change the lock without management permission.
The only thing I can think of is to have that notification engraved on the door so that any locksmith can see that but but even then there is nothing to stop the rogue unit owner from gluing a cover plate over that. Surely there must be an elegant solution to what must be a common problem.
Maybe a fancy electronic lock that needs to be unlocked using a phone, but it's a block of 60 units and it might well be a big ask to expect everyone to have a phone capable of unlocking it. And presumably the best locksmiths can just bypass that anyway.
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On 9/20/18 9:37 PM, 543dsa wrote:

Would a lock with a four digit passcode be of any use?
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Fraid not, he would just get his locksmith to change that.
Just been talking to my locksmith and he can't think of any way to do it.
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On 21/09/18 04:54, 543dsa wrote:

Why would a locksmith have to change it? If the miscreant forgets the passcode he/she/it would have to ask someone else for it

Then he is an idiot.
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So that the miscreant gets how own unique passcode.
If the miscreant forgets the

He is locking everyone out except himself.

Then you wont have any difficulty spelling out how the miscreant can be prevented from using his own locksmith from locking everyone out of the balcony except himself.
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On 21/09/2018 07:37, 543dsa wrote:

If its available to everyone why does it need a lock at all?
Perhaps the miscreant changes it himself, perhaps he/she is a member of this group, perhaps we have advised them how...
Mike
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Muddymike wrote:

Already said, to keep non authorized people out.

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wrote in message

what's the likelihood or some non authorised person wanting to wander onto someone's balcony and set up a BBQ there?
This doesn't equate with the bin example. There is something to be gained by using someone else's bin
tim

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wrote in message

Very likely when they don’t have a balcony to use for that.
There is already a problem with those who do not own or rent flats in that block using the communal rubbish bins.

There is when you don’t have a balcony that can be used for a BBQ too.

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wrote in message

why?
if you don't stick a sign on the entrance to your block saying "Balcony unsecured please don't use it if you don't live here" how will the even know that:
a there is a balcony that can be used b) that it is unsecured

As I said, that's a complete different situation.
Bins have to be left in an obviously accessible place so that the bin men can collect them, so it's easy for someone to notice it and try to use it. And the use is transitory, so they can do so without being spotted
entrances to communal balconies are usually in less obvious places and the use is continuous, so it is likely that someone will spot them and eject them half way through their BBQ
tim

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wrote in message

Because their flat or block of flats doesn’t have anywhere to do that. Yes, they can certainly use public parks etc for that, but it is not very surprising that some choose to use what they have no right to use.

It is obviously part of the block of flats that they have no right to use.

There are no bin men that collect them, the block of flats pays a commercial operation to remove the rubbish.
They in fact had a group of individuals use the block car park for a pissup in the very early hours of one weekend morning.

That assumes it is obvious that they have no legal right to use it. With 60 flats, some of them being rented, it isnt that easy to keep track of who has the right to use communal property and who doesn’t. That’s why that balcony has key access with those who have the right to use it getting a key that allows them to use it.
They are considering locking the rubbish area to prevent the general public from dumping their rubbish in the bins too. But with such a big block of flats, there is always a problem with some who find it a nuisance to unlock doors all the time and who just prop the lockable doors to communal property so that the purpose of the lock is defeated.

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If there is common property there must be an entity responsible for maintai ning it and possibly paying taxes on it. The same entity responsible for pa ying to have the trash removed. Under most laws, that entity has the author ity to set rules, levy fines and be awarded court costs.
You should look into the concept of "adverse possession" under which someon e who openly and adversely occupies a property for a stated period becomes the legal owner.
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On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 12:27:56 PM UTC-4, 543dsa wrote:

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Who is this "they" you are referring to? As I said in other posts, a property like this where there are common elements in addition to private units has to have the arrangement described in it's founding documents. In the USA that would be the Master Deed and Bylaws. Those define the common area elements and specify a board that is elected from the unit owners that is responsible for maintaining the common elements, setting rules and regulations for their use, etc. Those documents gives that board the legal authority to enforce the bylaws, rules and regulations. Enforcement would include sending out letters warning of violations, followed by holding a hearing if necessary and fining a unit owner that refuses to comply. The above documents give the board the power to lien the units too, if they refuse to pay the fines, just as they can for not paying maintenance fees. Additionally, if the owner has been told and continues, I'd bring in the local police and tell them a unit owner is tampering with, defacing common property and ask them to talk to them. Putting up a wireless security camera to capture what goes on at the door is an option too.
This makes no sense. This can't be the first rodeo at a property like this . Boards typically have plenty of experience with people parking in someone else's parking space, parking cars in spaces reserved for visitors, putting trash out on wrong days, having pets that are not allowed, putting up signs where they are not allowed, etc. This is just one more of those things and you handle them all as I described above.
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Where I used to live, there were several blocks of houses and a large apartment block. There were a couple of brick enclosures with (unlocked) doors on them, and these contained large bins with lids. For the first few years, the instruction was that all residents of the development should put their rubbish in those bins, and place their own recycling boxes in there. Everything was emptied on the appropriate days - I'm not sure whether it was by the council or a private contractor.
Then the rules changed. Now the communal bins were only for use by the people in the apartment block, and everyone else was issued with various bins - one for general waste, one for garden waste and the same boxes and bags as before for cans, bottles and paper.
It quickly developed into a house owners versus apartment owners/tenants row, because the rules had been changed and the house owners suddenly found that they had to accommodate bins that they had not had to do before. It was a particular problem for the few people who actually used their garages to keep their cars in, because it was almost impossible to get to a bin when a car was in the way.
The management committee directors put the lower price of the new collection before the wishes of the house owners - or maybe they were told that they had no choice in the matter and that it was a new policy of the collection organisation that was non-negotiable.
I moved shortly after this row blew up so I don't know how it ended, but I know there were accusations of house owners "illegally" putting rubbish in the communal bins, and threats to delve through bins looking for letters etc that were addressed to people who should have been using the bins as proof. It was all VERY petty. I got a big cheer from al the other house owners when I made that point at a residents' meeting: that the brick enclosures were built and designated as communal to all residents, and now the rules were being unilaterally imposed on us and they were setting one group of people against another.
We were told in no uncertain terms that we were not allowed to keep our own bins in the communal area and must put them out ourselves on the appropriate day. If you were going away, your bin remained full unless you were prepared to leave a garage key with your neighbours. The previous solution meant that once the rubbish was in the communal bins, you didn't have to be in on bin day.
Some berk from the council even suggested that we keep our bins on our front lawns if we weren't going to be in on bin day - which on an open-plan estate (no fences or hedges between lawns and the communal paths) means that the bins disfigure it for everyone - hence the builders providing the communal bin stores!
So sometimes the problem isn't the general public, its your own neighbours who are "the wrong sort of neighbour" (apartment versus house) ;-)
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NY wrote:

Pretty much the norm in my area - there really isn't anything else we could reasonably do. Bins out on bin day, or earlier if you are going to be away.
Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
snipped-for-privacy@cdixon.me.uk
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wrote in message

As I said in the original, so the general public can't use it.

No he doesn’t.
perhaps he/she is a member of

No, that hasn’t happened.
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Richard wrote:

you do not seem to be getting it, one owner is just getting a locksmith to change the complete lock so that he is the only one with a key.
the thing would be for the property management if they knew the person doing it to charge said owner, tennant or whatever for the cost of changing it back again and if they knew which locksmith did it, tell them not to.

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But there is no way to make him pay that.
and if they knew which locksmith did it, tell

But he is free to use another given that it is a big city.

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On 9/21/2018 3:43 AM, 543dsa wrote:

...

...
Why not? He's got to pay the rent, doesn't he? Who's the owner for this property that does the changing back?
It's never been stated so far as to what the actual organization of the ownership of these units is.
--


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Nope, he's an owner, not a renter.

Each of the 60 flats/apartments is owned by separate individuals.

It’s a strata title building in Australia. Sort of like a condo in the US, but legally quite different in detail. We don’t have anything like home owners associations here.
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