moisture barrier under shimmed wall

I'm putting up wall framing in the basement. There are two schools: build the framing in place (vertically) using toenailing, or build it on the floor half an inch short, and then raise it into place and put half-inch shims under it. The latter is recommended for amateurs, so that's what I'm doing.
Before raising the wall, I'm stapling a black paper moisture barrier ("Scutan paper") to the back of the studs, with enough paper at the bottom to wrap under the wall and seal to the plastic vapour barrier when I get that in place. When I wrap the paper under the wall, should I put the shims inside the paper (to provide a moisture barrier right down to the floor), or outside and under the paper? Does it matter?
Either way, this leaves an uninsulated gap at the foot of the wall. The studs are not completely flush to the concrete wall (since the concrete wall is not plumb), so there is a possibility of cold air pouring down the wall and out this gap (the framing rests on a subfloor I've laid down). I was thinking of squirting in foam insulation. Will this be difficult working so close to the floor (because the can is inverted)?
None of the books mentions insulating this gap, so I wonder if it's a problem at all.
Another thing -- I'm putting up the wall in eight-foot sections, and taping the Scutan paper overlap using that red Tuck tape. Obviously it's hard to tape on the concrete side -- I have to seal the overlaps from inside the room. Will this be adequate?
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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You can't be serious...but just in case you are..forget the shims underneath. Nail the bottom plate to the floor and nail or screw the top plate to existing overhead framing/joists.
If you do go with the "recommended" shim underneath method and foam, kindly send photos, we could use a good laugh
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"Rudy" ( snipped-for-privacy@no-onehome.net) writes:

Thanks, I guess, but I'm not making this up. See for example
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/keep_heat_in/chapter_5/chapter_5_2.cfm?PrintView=N&Text=N
"If all alignments are perfectly level and square, you may be able to build the wall on the floor, tilt it into place, shim the bottom plate and then secure it."
http://www.bt3central.com/forum/topic.asp?ARCHIVE=true&TOPIC_ID 21
"Once the garage was floating I'd shim under each of three lower walls until the bottom plate was level all around."
I have a couple of printed books that also suggest shimming the bottom plate (I dont; have them here at the moment). Shimming the top plate, or not shimming at all and just pinning the top plate to the overhead joists with partly exposed nails, does sound reasonable and it's not too late for me to do that. The floor is already level, so that's not an issue. But now I'm wondering why some sources specifically say to shim the bottom plate.
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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James Owens ( snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA) writes:

I'm thinking now that if I shim the top plate and insulate the header spaces above the wall, there will be an uninsulated gap above every upright in the framed wall, up on the cold above-ground part. I guess I could spray some foam in there. . .
-- "For it is only of the new one grows tired. Of the old one never tires." -- Kierkegaard, _Repetition_
James Owens, Ottawa, Canada
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snipped-for-privacy@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (James Owens) wrote in message writes:

Thanks for the links. TB
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