MIN DISTANCE FROM EDGE OF SINK TO NEAREST ELECTRIC OUTLET

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I am helping an elderly lady get her house ready to sell. There is an electrical outlet in the wall about 26 inches from the nearest point of the sink. I know it has been mentioned here many many times, but I'm too tired to go scratching around. What is the minimum distance from the sink to an outlet that is not Ground Fault protected?
Thanks,
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There is no minimum distance from a kitchen sink. If the outlet was installed before GFCI protection was required, it can be a standard outlet. If it was installed after the GFCI requirement, it must be properly protected.
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The more interesting thing is that by current code, if that outlet is 26" from the sink, you'd need another one 2" from the sink.
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The current outlets are nowhere near as dense as current code, but the house is80+ years old. I know any home inspector will want GFCI's near the sink, but you did not say what that minimum safe distance is.
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If we are talking about a kitchen sink, then all receptacles serving kitchen countertops must be GFCI protected. On the other hand, a receptacle can be under a kitchen sink, to serve a garbage disposal or the dishwasher, and then it does not require GFCI protection. So for kitchens, it's not just a simple minimum distance.
Cheers, Wayne
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wrote:

I think you need to find out what a "house inspector's" legal jurisdiction is. Typically there are grandfather laws. If the receptacle was installed before GFCI protection was required, then non should be required now. As I said earlier, current code would require more receptacles as well. Where do you draw the line?
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Current code (and the code for over a decade) does not talk about the sink at all. It says all receptacles serving counter tops in the kitchen shall be GFCI protected. Any counter top. In laundries, utility rooms and wet bars the rule is 6 feet.
Home inspectors are not really bound by code, they brag about not being code inspectors. They flag anything that doesn't look right to them. (right or wrong) so don't be shocked if this shows up on their report, even if George Washington slept there.
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wrote:

This house according to the OP is 80 years old, so it's wiring and outlets including the kitchen predate any GFCI requirements.
The current code does mention a sink. 210.52 C1 exception, which says that receptacle outlets aren't required behind one
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The current outlets are nowhere near as dense as current code, but the house is80+ years old. I know any home inspector will want GFCI's near the sink, but you did not say what that minimum safe distance is.
There is no minimum distance. An outlet can be right up to the sink
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Is there a ground available in the box? If so, stick a GFCI in there, and I don't think the inspector will even check the distance to the sink. He'll just stick his little checker in there, and when it glows green, move on to the next one.
--
aem sends...

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..
I haven't checked to see if there is a ground or not. Part of the house is very old BX, some modifications are 14/2 with ground. I'll check with my VOM and see how things look. The bathroom outlet on the side of the vanity is 14/2 G so changing that out should be easy. Some of the older BX wires are so stiff with age that they will be a challange to change.
In the kitchen, I am only going to replace the two duplex units that are closest to the sink, all other outlets are at least 6 feet from the nearest point of the sink. The hardest part is going to be working in close quarters as the sink box seems to be very shallow, I will have to check to make sure they are deep enough to handle the GFCI depth.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

You don't need a ground with a GFCI outlet. They have little stickers in the box that say "No Equipment Ground" that you put on them when no ground is available.
The shallow box might be a problem.
Bob
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

There is always wiremold extender boxes, like where you pull a surface feed off a wall outlet. You can use the box by itself. I haven't looked lately, but I think there are some non-industrial-looking ones out there. Paint to match the wall or the box cover, and I don't think anyone will freak out, especially in an old house. Stroll down the box aisle at big-box, or drop by a real electrical supply house not during rush hour. Lots of strange boxes out there.
--
aem sends...

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On Thu, 13 May 2010 16:45:24 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

If this is a breaker panel it is probably easier just putting the whole circuit on a GFCI breaker
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On Thu, 13 May 2010 20:22:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

This sounds like the safest way to go. Breakers are more expensive though. You stand a chance in getting the fridge on a GFI which I think is a bad idea.
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wrote:

I am not so quick to give the same advice. If the wiring in the house is 80 years old, then the insulation on the wiring could be brittle. It is better not to disturb wiring that old unless you plan on changing it.
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...
Exactly! I opened the cover of a junction box in the basement ceiling, the joints were wrapped with tape rather than wire nuts, and the wireinsulation was so stiff I feared moving it for fear the insulation would crack off the wires. As long as they were not disturbed, everything should be fine. I put the cover back on and tightened down the screws and went upstairs.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

There are probably soldered connections under that tape. Wire nuts did not become common practice until late 50s - early 60s, at least in my part of the country. My grandmother's 1961 house in Indiana still had some soldered connections, while this 1960 house in Michigan I am sitting in is wire nuts or screw terminals throughout.
--
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Metspitzer wrote:

If there is a ground in the box, the wiring is not 80YO. Probably the same age as the most recent kitchen remodel. 80YO house is likely on 2nd or 3rd kitchen. A 1930 original kitchen is unlikely to have any counter outlets- back then you were lucky if you got an outlet on the stove, and maybe a clock/fan outlet high on one wall. Pull-chain ceiling fixtures were still quite common back then. I'd be surprised if kitchen string hasn't been redone. Unless this is a fancy house, you were lucky to get one wall outlet per room, back then.
Of course, before you muck around, you do want to pull some cover plates, and look in basement and/or attic to see what the feed lines look like. Anything wiring older than late-50s is unlikely to be grounded, unless it is in greenfield cable or something.
--
aem sends...

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FYI, the steel jacket of an AC cable constitutes and equipment ground. Greenfield, is not cable, it's conduit, and at best it's only good for an equipment ground when shorter then six foot lengths
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