Low Water Pressure - What are my options?

I am on well water. My pump is set to 40-60psi range on my tank.
Most of the house is fine with pressure. The problem areas are Kitchen when the washing machine is being used. The kitchen and washing machine are on the same branch. Will isolating the washing machine to its own branch fix the problem?
Second story bathroom, low pressure all the time. Dunno what can be done about this.
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theedudenator wrote:

I had low pressure when demand was high, most noticeably when the sprinkler system was operating in the morning 2nd floor shower pressure would be low. Put in a small booster pump mounted on top of a small pressure tank (sold as a unit) and that has cured the problem.
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I got a variable speed pump, manufactured by Grundfos. It increases speed when water is in demand, to keep pressure constant. So, if you take a shower, if someone else flushes a toilet, no change in shower pressure.
It's expensive, but well worth it. It also replaces the giant pressure tank with a tiny one.
I've got mine set to a luxurious 70 psi.
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I don't see how that would replace my large well tank. The large well tank keeps the well pump from running off/on cycles.
Do you have well or city water?
wrote:

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I don't see how that would replace my large well tank. The large well tank keeps the well pump from running off/on cycles.
Do you have well or city water?
___________________________________
I have a well.
The kit comes with a pump for the well, the very small tank to replace the very large tank, and a computer-control unit where you set the pressure, mounted next to the small tank. I'd say the tank volume is about 1-2 gallons. The unit runs when water is in demand, and doesn't when there is no demand. I can run the washing machine, take a shower, someone can flush a toilet, and that warm shower water is hitting my back at a constant 70 psi all the while.
Google it.
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You may want to find a well company you trust and ask them for suggestions. I manage an HOA water system with 30 houses on 8 wells and have discovered that things aren't always intuitive. You can induce problems if you don't know what you are doing adding any kind of booster pump/additional pressure tank.They might have some ideas that will save you from doing something that either doesn't work or worse...
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systems. At to eliminating the big pressure tank, no. If anything, add another one to make the well pump last longer, short cycles kill.
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