Load capacity of 200-amp panel

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net says...

They are cooking you. If the beds are commercial units they can use from 10 to about 20 KW. The time is about 5 to 15 minutes depending on how much you want to tan.
I have not been in one either, just going by the specifications of them.
It does not mater if it is UV light or just heating units all of the power will be converted to heat. Not sure how much the person will carry out with them.
If the beds are that big he probably also needs to up the air conditioner by about another ton.
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On 06/26/2016 02:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@adelphia.net wrote:

Maybe you could get a few more watts out of your panel if you installed some PC case fans to cool the breakers?
/sarcasm
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On Sunday, June 26, 2016 at 2:23:10 PM UTC-4, Tony944 wrote:

Wire properly sized presents no risk, so IDK what the alleged problem with wire heating is when the draw is within the 200A rating, there is considerable margin. And resistance is resistance, so a bad connection with resistance X is going to create the same heat with 196A flowing through it on a 400A service as it will on a 200A.
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On Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 9:02:51 AM UTC-7, JayB wrote:

If you apply 240-Volt to the load and have 200 Amps current, you've got 48 KVA. If you apply 120-volt and have a 200 amps, you've got 24 KVA. If you connect 200 Amps load to each of 120-volt leg, you've got 48 KVA total.
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On Mon, 31 Oct 2016 13:35:20 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In other words, if you balance the load and use only 120 volt loads, you can run a maximum of 400 amps. If you run only 240 volt loads, you can only run 200 amps
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On 10/31/2016 8:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Technically, yes, but 80% max is recommended
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That is just a guideline for some individual loads and a rule for others. When you do the load calc for the whole service, you can install based on 100% of the result if you are being cheap. The NEC is not a design manual, it is just a minimum standard.
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On Mon, 31 Oct 2016 20:00:11 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And oftentimes the pole transformer is not capable of 48KVA. Most of them have their KVA rating painted right on the exterior of them. (You may need binoculars to read it from the ground).
And dont forget that they often supply power to other homes and/or buildings as well.
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On Wed, 02 Nov 2016 16:05:10 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Transformers supplying multiple homes MAY not be capable of supplying the full load of all the houses at once. Any single residence transformer WILL be sized to handle the full load - at least in Ontario.
I was unable to install a 200 amp sewrvice in my home because the transformer feed/undeground cable was lot large enough. I was limitted to 125 amps.
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On Wed, 02 Nov 2016 19:06:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That is certainly not true in the US. They will feed 3 houses from a 50 KVA unit and assume it will handle spikes above the 50 KVA. My house os one of 3 on a 37 KVA unit. The guys told me, they will replace it with a 50 when we burn it up. These houses have 200a panels but they are fed with 2ga 1350 alloy aluminum overhead service conductors. Voltage drop has not been a problem here for me. I still get 124 or so
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On Monday, October 31, 2016 at 8:00:09 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In reality there is never more than 200 amps of current flowing in a 200A service. If it's a balanced load, the same 200A is flowing through half the 120V loads, then on through the other half of the 120V loads. There is never more than 200A flowing in the service conductors. You can support 400A worth of 120V loads, but it's just 200A being counted twice.
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On 10/31/2016 03:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

And no 400A anywhere.
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