LED bulb: 17 Years, $50.00

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Last time I bought incandescents, they were 30 each for a pack of four.
Now that incandescents are to be phased out, prices are going up, but that's an artificial increase.

Or $2.40 for the incandescents at the price I used to be able to pay.
And your numbers get thrown wholly out of whack if a few CFLs blow before their rated lives, which I'm discovering is not an uncommon occurrence.

That's the problem; it's a trivial amount (I give up one Starbuck's latte a month and there's my $5.70 savings right there). Plus I get ugly lighting unless I buy just the right kind of bulb; I need a special kind to put upside down, a special kind for over the stove; you're not really supposed to toss them out with the trash, etc., etc....
No thanks.
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Amen, the ones I have tried have all blown. They have been name brand, not discount bulbs. The one on the front porch is still going. By choice I will not be investing in any more CFL or LED until the technology improves.
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DanG wrote:

I've been buying my CFLs in the multi packs at Depot / Lowe's / Sam's / Costco for quite some time and I honestly have not had any of them that had short life spans.
I moved about 5.5 years ago, and loaded up most all the fixtures with new CFLs at that time. So far I have replaced two CFLs, both within the last couple months and both were lights that got much longer than the 3 hours per day of on time that the 7 year life expectancy is based on. Indeed these two lights probably average 8 hours per day of on time, so they both outlasted their rating by a fair margin.
As for the quality of the light, I find they are quite acceptable, and having spent some 15 years in video production I am pretty attuned to color temperature. Also as a result of that video production experience I know not to light an area with mixed color temperature sources, so the color temperature is consistent throughout my house.
I also am using the 26W killer CFLs in inexpensive clamp light fixtures for tasks that I used to use portable 500W halogen floods for. I get plenty of light, for far less power and far less heat.
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On 11/04/10 6:07 PM, DanG wrote:

There's your problem, you think you're investing when you buy a light bulb.
But it's true about LED bulbs not lasting all that long. There's a huge difference between a low power, 20mA LED indicator lamp that will likely last for a hundred years, and a high-power LED lamp that is designed to actually illuminate a given area. High power LEDs generate an enormous amount of heat at the very small semiconductor junction. It's very difficult to adequately heat sink these junctions. If you look at something like a 3W MR16 lamp, you can see the amount of metal used for the heat sink. If you block the air flow across the bulb by putting it into a sealed enclosure (like for automotive lamps) then it will quickly self destruct. Incandescent bulbs dissipate the filament heat through the glass of the bulb which is much easier to manage.
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Much of how an incandescent gets rid of its heat is by radiation. Close to half the power going into an incandescent (varies by individual design) becomes infrared of wavelengths that the filament radiates through the glass. That infrared goes where the light goes. The heat materializes where this radiation is absorbed - usually mostly outside the fixture.
Incandescents also work OK at higher temperatures that CFLs and LED bulbs are not OK in.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote in

And you can safely put the very same incandescent 1) over your stove 2) by your bed 3) on the porch 4) upside down 5) in the kids' rooms...
And you know the light emitted is always going to look "right" no matter low little you paid for that incandescent.
I am happy to leave CFLs on the store shelf for others to buy.
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isty.com:
And you are so blissfully happy paying 75% more for electricity for a apliance that outputs near 95% of its energy consumed as heat. Run 11 -100 w incandesants and be happy knowing you AC this summer has to remove that extra 1000w of heat CR and Popular Mechanics Mag did reviews and dont agree with your happiness on color rendition of life expectancy. With HDs 9 yr warranty my HD soft whites will be free forever , be happy, stay ignorant.
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wrote:

Yep. Because in actual dollar terms, that 75% is a trivial amount of money.

Most of our incandescents are 40 and 60 watt. We do have a couple of Tri-lites that go up to 150, but they're normally on at the 100W setting.

Well, that's part of the point. Generally speaking, when I need my bulbs, the A/C is off. When I need my A/C, the bulbs are off.
Moreover, in the winter, when the need for the bulbs is greatest, the heat from the bulbs reduces the need for the furnace, so my gas bill is lower.
And we follow the ancient (and apparently forgotten) precept of turning the lights off when we leave a room, so there are few bulbs left on regularly. With incandescents, I can do that. Snap, it's on. Snap, it's off. No waiting.

I see threads in this groups with comaplints about color unless you buy /just/ the right kind of bulb. And being in people's homes with CFLs, I have to disagree with CR. Also, CR is hard left-wing and as religiously "green" as they come, so their judgements are unlikely to be bias-free.

Except that you had to pay ten times the cost of incandescents to get that 9-year warranty...
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Almost all of ours are 60W, though there are 4-12 per fixture. ;-)

Our heat pumps will "run" seven or eight months a year... When in use they don't often get shut down at night (though the thermostat will cycle).

Yep.
Perzactly! The average bulb in our house is likely on for 2 minutes per day with only the bathroom lights on for anything close to an hour per day. CFLs really suck in our application; won't have them.

Yep. I don't like any CFLs I've seen. They're ugly in expensive light fixtures, as well. No thanks.

;-)
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.45c a bulb, 1.85 a four pack for HD CFLs, you need to do some learnin.
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For cheap crap that looks like hell, will *not* last 9 years (and the company won't anyway), and is a fire trap, perhaps. You need to *think*.
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wrote:

Incandescents used to be 30 a bulb until the recent legislative attacks.
And you ain't gonna get no pretty light out of the bargain-basement CFLs, that's for sure.
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wrote:

Assuming you get any light AT ALL after a couple months.
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Here again your logic is absent, you are clueless. HD CFLs and most others now replicate incandesants on color rendition. There is a 2-3 yr old review comparison at Popular Mechanics magazine that rated HD soft white BETTER than incandesants at color rendition in some situations. Cfls coatings have come along way over the last few years, technology moves on if you havnt heard. That pop machanics review is hard to find, but its there, read it. CR also did a review comparison test, it will all suprise you. At HD you have a 30 day no questions asked return policy, buy and try em. Keep a reciept and its a 9 yr warranty so you can perpetualy always have cfls.
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Hey dumbs ass, .45c a piece, 9 yr warranty, 75% electric use reduction, and if you think HD, GE, Phillips etc etc will go broke then a cave is your best home option. You dont think.
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wrote:

Sorry, lying is not thinking.
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keith wrote in part:
<SNIP to here>

It costs about half as much to heat a home with a heat pump as it does with resistive heating. And in most areas, it costs less to heat a home with gas or oil than it does with resistive heating.

What? No need for lighting for long outside a bathroom in a house in a location that needs heat 7-8 months out of the year?
<SNIP from here>
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Sat, 24 Apr 2010 05:28:31 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

The "half as much" applies to a small outside temperature band where less heat is actually needed. Yes, that drops the cost of the "wasted" incandescent electricity by "50%" instead of 100% and a similar amount with other heat sources. Something the CFL idiots never take into account. That still doesn't get us to "ransley's" 50% electricity savings he's trying to tell us that is somehow "normal".

It's time for you to try thinking, Don. Heat pumps are not only used in heating season.

Use a proper sig separator.
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