Laying hardwood laminate question..

I have 2 rooms that I will be laying HW laminiate in. My dining room and kitchen are joined by an open 36" threshold and I was curious about what I should do when laying the floor down..
Should I treat each room as a seperate room and use some kind of T-molding in the threshold, or should I try and create one large floor going from room to room?
Thank you, Jamie
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Jamie Garofalo wrote:

It depends on the manufacturer. If there is less than a certain amount of threshold length then you must use T-molding.
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I did the family roomy and into the hallway. I was able to just go from the room to the hall with no threshold or trim. I may go into the next room with he same flooring. If I do, I'll just continue with a full board, no T molding. If I decide to use a different wood or pattern, I may go with a T molding to give a clear delineation. No molding will give a larger appearance with no unbroken lines. Ed
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Jamie Garofalo wrote:

There are a couple of issues first are you doing a floating floor? Is it snap in or glue up, are you glueing it down. Many Hardwood laminates <assuming this is the stuff with real wood on top of what looks like ply wood> may not respond well to a long thin line of flooring going to a larger room especially if it is a floating floor. I am inclined to play it on the safe side and use the T moulding. This allows the 2 areas to move independantly and should avoid issues like buckleing.
Most flooring manufacturers have a tech line you may want to call thier 1800 line and ask them what they recommend for your specific situation.
If they say to do it as one area then go for it. Visually it is going to give you more continuity and not break the area up as much.
--
JSin
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On 23 Dec 2003 06:22:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@xpedite.com (Jamie Garofalo) wrote:

Check the manufacturers directions to see how far you can go before they require a T-Molding. If you can get away without the T-molding that is what I would do. I find it looks nicer to have one continuous surface where possible.
Steve B.
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