Latax primer over oil based stain - ok?

The wood trim on my house currently has a dark brown, semi-opaque stain (probably oil based). We plan to change the color to an off- white (Swiss Coffee) and will be using Duration latex paint, which is self priming and supposedly goes on pretty thick.
Should I use one coat of stain blocking primer and one coat of paint, or two coats of the Duration paint? I bought some "ABC" stain blocking, acrylic latex primer from Sherwin Williams. Does anyone know if this is any good, or should I be using something else?
Thanks for any advice!
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On Aug 6, 2:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Need more info, is there a clear coat of polyurethane or varnish over the original stain? You're saying your trim was at one time oil stained but never clear coated?
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There is no clearcoat or varnish. I'm not 100% certain that it's an oil based stain on there now. My reasons for suspecting it is are that there is no peeling at all; only fading/oxidation. On some of thw wood, it looks to be a thick opaque stain (that looks pretty much like paint), while other parts (e.g. the patio) seems to have a semi- transparent stain, as the wood grain is visible. It is rough sewn wood and I was hoping to just apply the appropriate primer to it without sanding (I've already pressure washed and repaired damaged areas).
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On Aug 6, 3:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sorry, I thought you were talking about the interior trim, duh.
The existing finish could be a latex stain which would not peel, or it could be oil. In any case a good exterior latex primer should be used 1) because the dark color will be hard to cover with Swiss Coffee white alone and 2) because you are not sure if it is oil (latex over oil should always be primed). Paint that goes on thick is not necessarily a good thing, especially exterior. I would definitely go with one coat of exterior latex primer and one coat of paint, rather than two coats of paint. The primer can be tinted to match the paint for better coverage. "Self-priming" is an oxymoron.
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On Mon, 06 Aug 2007 12:59:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In your situation and within the parameters noted, I've had the best results using 100% acrylic latex solid stain as opposed to paint. You might wish to discuss this with someone knowledgeable at the Sherwin Williams store.
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wrote:

One of the painting contractors I spoke to recommended the same thing. As I recall, the advantages are lack of peeling, showing the wood grain and ease of application. Everything else I've read indicates that paint would have a longer usable life. My priority for this house (soon to be a rental) is long life, thus my choice to paint.
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On Mon, 06 Aug 2007 16:34:58 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The longevity discrepancy you note has not been my experience. Local climatic conditions will be a major factor in your choice.
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