Kitchen range-switching from gas to electric 240v ?

Page 5 of 9  

Pete C. wrote:

No gas can is 'fully sealed' if the lid/spout is not put on tightly and correctly every time. Plastic cans UV weaken from sunlight, and can get damaged by winter weather or improper handling. The now-rare(for new ones) metal cans can rust. And yes, there are still a whole lotta old cans with vent doohickeys on them. Wish I could find one- these modern no-vent cans are a major pain to pour from without splashing. Careful people would likely never have a problem, but non-careful people are the reason we have fire departments.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just bought a gas "can" after my last move. It *cannot* be sealed tightly, particularly with the spout attached. The only worthwhile feature of the can is that the vent is part of the spout, which aso acts as a cut-off when the tank if full. If the spout is stuck far enough into the tank the vent goes under the fuel, cutting off the vent. Sure, it's possible to spill, but you have to try. Believing that gas cans are sealed is lunacy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
People with glass dood kitchen cabinets, its a show display for a kitchen they probably never use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw some OLD style cans at a flea market and bought them all:)
On the way back to the vehicle people were trying to buy them back off of me.
one guy offered me 20 bucks for a 2.5 gallon can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

We suffered through a couple short lived generations of piss poor vent free spout designs, but the current generation of vent free spouts (which are available separately for $5 or so and fit the earlier cans) are pretty good. Give one of the new ones a try.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Five gallons isn't going to get you vary far into a three-day outage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

No, but I store more than 5 gal, and I can also siphon from one of my trucks (34 gal) if needed. Also on that 72 hr outage I had, the power was on ~2 miles away so I could readily get more gas if needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In 44 years of home ownership, I've never been able to justify a generator. A few power outages lasted in the 1 to 3 hour range, only once did we have a 2 day outage after a hurricane. Putting out $500 to $1000 for a generator makes no sense to me. I do know some locations have days at a time every year and easily justify having one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote>

The only justification here in Bergen county NJ is if there is a need for life-sustaining equipment.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

My generator that cost me ~$800 some 25 years ago had a ~72 hour continuous run during and in the aftermath of that nice ice storm that hit northwestern CT somewhere in the 2000-2004 range (I forger exactly when). It has had many other outage runs in the 1 - 12 hr range as well. Indeed I just used it for around 4 hours about a week ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Most modern stoves, the burners can be lit with a match. The oven needs electric to operate the ignitor, and gas valve.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Newer stoves have all kinds of electronic controls have all kinds of electronics that fail and cost hundreds of dollars.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Yes/no/maybe, it's a bit more complicated than that. It depends on if you are using gas for other things as well, if not the monthly service charges for the gas service eclipse any savings on cost/BTU.
LP is a better option if you aren't using gas for other appliances, particularly since if you are only running a stove/range with LP, you do not need a large tank or any sort of service contracts with an LP dealer. I run my dual fuel range (5 gas burners and 2 electric ovens) off of a single 20# LP tank and that tank lasts about 8-10 months between taking it to be filled. If I has an all LP range with LP ovens, I might upgrade to a 40# LP tank, but in either case there are no service charges involved.

Common misconception. Electric can get plenty hot and melt aluminum pans. Electric is also more efficient thermally in that the element is in direct contact with the pan and a greater percentage of the heat is transferred to the pan vs. rising up past the pan like a gas burner.

I haven't ever seen an electric stove/range with just low-med-high, all I have seen and used had plenty of adjustment points in between.

This faster response to setting changes is the primary advantage of gas for cooking. It's not a huge disadvantage for electric though since it just requires you to lift the pan off the burner you turned down for a few seconds while the element cools.

True, but probably not a consideration for most folks yet. Give it a few more years as the US goes the way of Zimbabwe and we're reduced to subsistence farming and it may be a consideration. Of course at that point neither gas nor electric will be available.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you have gas in your house, and cooking is the only thing you're using it for, you're a fool. It's *far* cheaper to heat your house, make hot water, and dry your clothes with natural gas than with electricity.

If you aren't using gas for other appliances, a still better option is to get rid of the expensive-to-operate electric appliances and replace them with gas.

And you think gas can't??

Lucky thing, too, or else the cost difference would be even greater in favor of gas.

They still have discrete points, though, not the continuous variability of gas.

^^^^^^^ You misspelled "minutes".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

My electric dryer is extremely inexpensive to operate, particularly since my washer is a front load with "escape velocity" spin dry. My electric heat pump is inexpensive to operate as well.
Don't fall for the propaganda from the Nat Gas monopolies, do the math yourself, being careful to compare like appliances, not comparing a new gas appliance to a 30 year old non gas one like the gas monopoly's propaganda often does.

See above. My electric appliances are not expensive to operate by any means.

I didn't say if couldn't. I corrected the false assertion that gas stove burners got "MUCH" hotter than their electric counterparts.

Except that the cost difference isn't in favor of gas. If you actually do the math you'll find there is little difference.

The dozen or so discrete points cover the range from low to high just fine. Also electric can go lower than gas can unless you have expensive intermittent gas burners.

No, I did not. I cooked extensively on electric stoves for about 30 years, so I'm well aware of their response times. Ten seconds is about the maximum you need to hold the pan off the burner, and indeed you don't even have to hole it entirely off, just lifting the handle to have the pan at a slight angle and not in direct contact with most of the burner is sufficient.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Judging by the next sentence, it doesn't seem so.

You're, ummmm, overly optimistic if you think that an electric burner will cool off enough in ten seconds to make a significant difference. Boil water in a teakettle on an electric range. As soon as the kettle begins to whistle, turn the burner off, remove the kettle, and pour yourself a cup of tea. Set the kettle back down on the same burner -- a burner that's OFF, remember -- and observe as the water comes to a boil again, and the kettle begins to whistle. One more reason to dislike electric ranges.
The response time of electric burners isn't anywhere *near* fast enough to avoid boilovers or scorched white sauces if you inadvertently set the heat a bit too high, or if your attention gets distracted.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Well, I guess all the various electric ranges I've used over the years must be using some alien technology then, as that has not been how any of them have worked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

People who don't use a range for anything more complicated than frying hamburgers generally don't have any problems with the slow response time of an electric burner.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Funny, I've never had any difficulty making real (not blender) hollandaise sauce on any of the electric stoves I've used, nor custard ice cream base, nor creme brulee, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Odd, then, that you still harbor the delusion that a burner on an electric stove will cool off in ten seconds. Like someone else said, you must have magic burners. Or else you're full of, ummm, unreasonable optimism.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.