Killing Tree Roots

I have a few Cottonwood trees that have undermined and damaged the driveway with their roots. There are other areas of sidewalk that the damage is just starting.
I want to remove the trees, but unsure of the best approach. If I cut the trees to a stump will this encourage the roots to grow more? If I grind the stump, what about the roots under the drive, will they die off ot try to grow more.
I was thinking of cutting the trees, then killing the stump and roots. How should this whole thing be approached?
Thanks!
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On Mar 8, 8:49�am, snipped-for-privacy@aaol.com wrote:

cut down tree, if any regrows spray with herbicide, then grind out stump or let it rot.
mature trees can be beautiful things and add to property value.
you might consider a alternative of what i do to kill tree roots in my main sewer line. with estimates of 8 to 10 grand just for the line: ( every joint in the terracotta line has roots but one including all those under the house.....
plus replacing part of the driveway, a retaining wall and sidewalk i dump rock salt down the sewer, espically in the spring. when root growth is so fast.
so you could dig between the tree and driveway cutting the roots, and treat a small area with salt, which WILL discourage root growth:) heck you could bury a 2 inch pipe along the driveway, bury it in gravel, cover with dirt and just leave a fitting you could uncover and put a funnel in, pour in rock salt water.
note this might sound wierd but saves the tree, and the tree removal cost, plus rocksalt or softener salt is drop dead cheap
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On Sat, 08 Mar 2008 05:49:59 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aaol.com wrote:

Easy way: Cut down the trees. Remove enough of the stumps so that the mower blades can safely move over the stumps (prevent mower damage!). This will allow easy sucker removal. Leaves provide food for the tree; without leaves the roots will die. No need to remove the roots or stumps. You can speed stump rotting by drilling several deep holes into each stump and keeping the holes filled with 34-0-0 fertilizer.
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snipped-for-privacy@aaol.com wrote:

trimmed. The roots can't live without foliage and they will die.
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I believe in uprooting trees. When I have wanted to keep a tree, severing and removing the errant roots is an excellent solution.
Dick
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On Mar 8, 10:48am, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

Since it sounds like the trees are in areas where you don't want stumps, I would get them cut down and then grind the stumps. If you choose to do the cutting yourself, you can contact a local tree service for the grinding. If you're not in a hurry and tell them they can do it anytime in the next couple months, etc, you may get a good rate.
If any growth emerges, Roundup (glyphosate) will take care of it.
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Grinding the stump by contractors is only grinding around the tree trunk area, leaving the remaining runners intact. The chemicals - drill holes in tree stump, mix with hot water, repeat every month - that suppose to kill the roots may take many years and in my experience doesn't work. I ended up digging up all the individual roots by hand, and when roots are 10" or more in diameter, it may require a come along, digging bar and hydraulic jack or spreader. I further cut the roots at the concrete interface with a ax, sawall or jack hammer. Don't use chain saw if you don't want to sharpen the chain every few seconds of use - roots has embedded sand and rocks. If you want to pull out all the roots, saw cut the concrete.
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Don't you think he should just wait and see what happens before choosing the nuclear option? I mean that's a hell of a lot of work. I'm not familiar with Cottonwood trees, but most trees, once cut, don't present this level of difficulty in preventing new growth. Most species just die out on their own. Is there something special about these?
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On Mar 8, 7:29�pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

in any case when you cut the tree down it has a fully grown root system and since it must have leaves puts all its energy ino that, which a occasional spray of herbicides can control.
if you really want to kiil something mix roundup 50% with broadleaf weed control.
breaks several federal laws but killed impossible to kill poision ivy here
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hey mabe he could buy some bunker buster military surplus bombs? if its meant to take out a bunker a tree should be easy.............
on second thought tat might fragment the tree stump stasrting millions of lttle ones:(
I still like my idea of digging along the driveway and spoiling the soil so the tree cant grow roots in that area
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Don't you think he should just wait and see what happens before choosing the nuclear option? I mean that's a hell of a lot of work. I'm not familiar with Cottonwood trees, but most trees, once cut, don't present this level of difficulty in preventing new growth. Most species just die out on their own. Is there something special about these?
Ive cut down ornamental pear trees and this seem to force new sprouts all over the place. Regular mowing and trimming the stump for a couple of years seems to take care of it.
Jimmie
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