It wont stay shut by itself

When working on my car, I bring it right up close to the house and lay my tools out on the floor behind the front door. Since you never know when it will rain, it works out very handy since then all I have to do is close the door; and don't have to be picking up all the tools.
Now if its not warm the family doesn't like the cold air coming into the house and they want the front door shut, which is fair enough. Since the door just swings open I have to keep getting the keys out of my pocket to open the door.
I would like the door to stay shut on its own accord, yet just open with a push without having to use the keys. There is no room on the door jamb to screw one of those helical spring self closers. And anyway in general use we dont want the door to close by itself. Which also rules out one of those hydraulic self closers which could fit on at the top of the door.
Have tried using the strongest cuboard magnet I can find (In north London u.k.), but if the wind picks up surprisingly it will just not hold. Also tried cutting a thin wedge of cork glued to an upright jamb which makes the door a tight fit when closed. However the door shrinks in the summer and expands in the winter so that only works for about half the year.
Grateful for any suggestions, especially something similar to the cork arrangement which works just fine prividing the weather suits it. Thanks.
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The magnet out of a hard drive is flat and very strong.
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2010 11:06:09 -0400, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Really? What kind of hard drive has a big flat magnet inside? That defies all logic on the principals of how a hard drive works.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote:

ordinary IDE, the magnet is so strong that it is hard to get off a flat metal surface without tools!!!
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2010 16:27:12 +0100, Mrcheerful wrote:

Well I guess you learn something new every day. I would think a magnet anywhere near the metal recording medium where the data lives would wipe it out.
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Since Faraday all motors use magnets!
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2010 16:55:57 +0100, John wrote:

Not all use permanent magnets. The majority of small direct current motors yes use permanent magnets. But they rely on an armature with wound coils and a commutator with brushes to function. You wouldn't find that in todays drives. The spindle motor is a pulse driven 3 phase motor. The head actuator is a stepper motor. I wasn't aware there were strong magnets inside the drive. The base of the spindle inside the drive would have to contain the magnet. The base outside would contain the coils for driving the spindle plus a voice coil for data. Also there is a fluid bearing between magnet and coils on all newer drive over 5400 RPM.
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Buy some large 100mm PP castors, plank of wood, screw a Really Useful Box of 9L (short narrow oblong) 18W (large fat oblong) 19L (tall narrow oblong), attach a vertical pole for manoeuvring, done. You may want braked castors if on a slope.
You can buy something similar, with drawers, but the weight can become a pain unless you have a sloped door threshold.
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wrote:

But this is Sunday. Faraday's not for 5 days.
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wrote:

DAGS _rare earth magnets hard drive_
Get your free magnets ;)
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Peter Parry wrote:

Any idea what that shield is made of? it looks like aluminium, but isn't.
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2010 17:49:57 +0100, Mrcheerful wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mu_metal
Chris
--
Remove prejudice to reply.

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On Sun, 6 Jun 2010 17:49:57 +0100, Mrcheerful wrote:

Would it be mu-metal - an alloy of nickel IIRC?
--
Peter.
2x4 - thick plank; 4x4 - two of 'em.
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Pop on over to the locksmith and have him make you a spare key you can leave in the door while you are working on the car.
Another option would be to purchase a latch that you can install that does not require a key to operate, or has a function where it can be locked or unlocked as you see fit. These are very common in the US and Canada, and while custom doesn't have them in use in the UK, I would bet that something of this sort is available from your local locksmith.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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If the OP has one of the modern double-glazed doors, especially the ones than shoot dead-bolts up, down, left, right and every-which-way when locked, it's probably not an option - at least not without paying the locksmith a fair wad for him to come and fit a replacement.
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wrote:

But those types of doors already have a latch where the door remains shut and is only locked when you lift up on the lever. At least the ones that I have seen that have made it to California.
Still the local locksmith should have a solution at hand, even if it is only the spare key.
--

Roger Shoaf

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True with ours but my daughter's has no lever on the outside. Let the door shut when you're outside and you need the key to operate the latch.
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wrote:

OK so there are some models that have no lever on the outside, but Still the local locksmith is probably knowledgeable about the hardware in use in his area and might be able to come up with a solution that is cheap, easy and aesthetically pleasing.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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wrote:

Get one of those toolboxes made for pickup truck beds and keep it near the door, put tools in it, close the lid when you finish working on car for the day. Or build something similar to a dog house with lift up lid. Makes more sense than opening the house door over and over and letting all the heating or cooling escape.
Better yet, build a garage to work on the car..... Of course that costs more.
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wrote:
Are you really a drunk? Have you tried Alcoholics Anonymous?
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