It's Trippin'

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A few years ago while remodeling I installed a CFI (sp?) outlet for the microwave oven.It seemed like a good idea at the time. However, last night a whopping lightning stroke took out all of the power in the area for a while. When it was back on, the microwave oven was dead as well as the toaster also plugged into it.
I checked the outlet and it had apparently tripped. I tried to reset it, but nothing happened. Can someone tell me how to get thee power back on in that outlet?
Thanks.
Ron
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It's called a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) or sometimes just a GFI.
They do die occasionally. If the reset button isn't work, try replacing the outlet (<$15 at the BORG).
-Tim
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If you happen to have another GFI outlet further upstream on the same circuit, make sure to reset that outlet also. If not, then simply buy a new outlet.
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Assuming the microwave was installed on a dedicated circuit, I'd first check the circuit breaker that feeds the GFCI, if that doesn't do it, replace the outlet

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A bummer replacing that, but thanks folks for the help.
Ron
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a
but
that
GFCI's offer no benefit as a power conditioner/lightning arrestor, they are just fancy circuit breakers filled with electronics that usually fry themselves with any voltage surges.
While you can change it for another gfi outlet, I would just pop in a regular one.
(and might even be tempted to run a second line and split the outlet)
As a microwave AND a toaster on the same outlet is not very likely going to allow you to use both at once anyway.
BTW, while this may seem obvious, you did test the microwave and toaster in a different outlet didn't you ?
AMUN
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GFCI's are NOT related to circuit breakers, other than both devices cut of the power in different situations. This is a myth that people don't seem to understand is not true.
- Circuit Breakers cut off power in the case of an overload condition (too much current through the breaker. - GFCI's cut off power in the case of a ground fault -- that is, the power going out the hot slot does not balance with the power coming into the neutral side -- which potentially means current is flowing through someone's body to ground, e.g. someone is being electricuted.
GFCI's will NOT protect against overcurrent. That's why you need both devices. GFCI breakers have both functions combined into one package.
-Tim
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to
someone's
While you are somewhat correct, pulling a few words out of context means little. As many GFI outlets also have overcurrent protection built in.
I do agree that a GFI should also be used in conjunction with a proper circuit breaker. But I never stated it shouldn't be.
The OP was concerned about damage after a lighting strike.
The need for a GFI is probably unwarranted for a microwave, and can be replaced with a regular outlet. And if the GFI is tripping it could also be caused by damage to the microwave plugged into it.
If you read my complete post, you might have seen that.
AMUN
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While GFCI protection is not required for a "microwave" it is required for all kitchen counter outlets regardless of what may be plugged into them

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Perhaps where you live, but not here, and I'm sure in many other locals they are not mandatory.
I suppose the one it really matters to is the OP.
AMUN
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If he lives in the U.S. and his electrical wiring is subject to the NEC, then it's a requirement

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So we can see there are definitely different rules in different areas.
Here in a kitchen all (new)counter outlets MUST be split with two branch circuits, and only 2 outlets total on any (kitchen) circuit. So GFI outlets are not even possible.
GFI's are only required within 3 feet of a sink/tub/shower, or outdoor outlets. And ALL GFI outlets MUST be grounded.
And remember that "new construction" and "repairs" are governed by different rules.
Personally I still think GFI's are over-rated by many, and are not only unnecessary in many places, but simply don't work. Appliances with motors often fry them. e.g. Refrigerators, Washers, Freezers, Sump Pumps, etc.
AMUN

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I've never heard of a GFCI being "fried" by a motor. The reason that certain large appliances (refrigerators, freezers, sump pumps) are allowed not to be on a GFCI is that the startup surge current of the motors sometimes causes them to false-trip. They don't FRY though, you simply have to reset them. But by the time you notice, the food has spoiled or the basement has flooded.
-Tim
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have
Yes, it is the motor starting currents that do the damage.
That's why most appliance makers state they do not recommend GFI's being used right in the instruction manuals. Often the electronics do fry, but without any outward signs.
Even "dirty" power (surges/brownouts) to a house can eventually do them in.
e.g. it doesn't trip anymore,.....ever,..... even when it should.
I would lay odds if you checked a bunch of GFI's that were "in use" randomly, probably over half would not be offering ANY protection, or be so far out of spec to be effectively useless..
How many have you ever seen properly "tested" after they were in use for a while though ? Those test buttons on most only cause a dead short, not a real ground fault test.
That's why I laugh at the people here who say, GFI's don't even need a ground. Once there is no protection, you might as well just have a .89 cent outlet.
AMUN
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says...

BS! The test button puts a resistor across the hot (load side) to the neutral (line side) to imbalance the current (by 10mA or so) in the load side hot and neutral wires. This acts *exactly* like a fault to ground and the GFCI trips exactly in the same way it would from any other ground fault. If the test button shorted the output there would be much smoke.

They don't! All circuits *should* have a ground (though some legacy circuits don't) but a GFCI does _not_ need a ground to function properly. An ungrounded circuit protected by a GFCI is far safer then an ungrounded circuit not so protected.

While this is true of any safety device, a functioning GFCI may save your life! Are you against smoke alarms because some don't test them every month? After all, a smoke alarm with a dead battery might just as well be an ugly wart on the ceiling.
--
Keith


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allowed
simply
the
in.
be so

a
fault
neutral
and
trips
circuits
ungrounded
outlet.
life!
After
on
Get a life
Plonk
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On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 16:31:17 -0400, Amun wrote:

Get a brain and stop telling people to fry themselves.

Oh, I'm so distrought! ...idiot.
--
Keith



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krw wrote:
--
WARNING:

Do NOT under any circumstances take advice from an idiot named AMUN.
  Click to see the full signature.
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Amun,
Sorry to come off rude, but you obviously don't know what you're talking about, and I ask that you please not answer questions related to GFCI outlets or any other area that you don't have knowledge in. Your advice is incorrect, and could be downright dangerous.
If you disagree with my assessment, could you please provide cites for the following 'facts' that you have claimed to be true:
- GFCI's are not required in kitchens - GFCI's can be damaged by motors in common appliances such as refrigerators. - GFCI's test buttons short out the circuit (which is prehaps the most idiotic thing you've said yet). - GFCI's can trip due to overcurrent situations. - etc.
I don't suspect you'll reply with said cites, but instead try to slander me and then say "Plonk". Mind proving me wrong?
-Tim
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Tim Fischer wrote:

AMUN Can provide nothing. He never has and never will. Warned AHR many times about his crappy and you said it, dangerous advice.
Thank you for responding to this yutz.
-- WARNING:
Do NOT under any circumstances take advice from an idiot named AMUN.
Regarding tile, electrical, HVAC, painting, drywall, plastering, lawn mower repair and various other construction issues, AMUN is a clueless moron. As things go AMUN will dissapear as his kind usually does when confronted with their bad advice by those who are knowledgeable in their respective fields. Until then - BEWARE
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