Is there any way to play a MP3 player thru Auto CD Player

Page 2 of 5  
wrote:

This is not a newer car. 96 Plymouth Voyager, with factory radio. This was their better option back then, some came with only an AM FM radio, and I believe they could still get a cassette tape model too, so thi CD model was top of the line back then. I dont think bluetooth even existed at that time. It would be nice if it had come with an AUX jack though.
The CD player is nice compared to cassette, or just plain radio, but changing CDs while driving is a pain, and keeping them in the car gets messy. MP3 solves all of that. Rather than a CD with 10 or 20 songs, a MP3 player can have hundreds of songs, and in a much smaller package. Also, the car CD player is real touchy. It will ERROR out or "skip" on a CD that has one tiny scratch or dirt. That same CD plays fine in my home CD player or the one on my computers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can your CD player play MP3's burned to a standard data CD? I know some can which would allow you to fit close to 100 songs or more on a single CD (depending on the MP3 bitrate).
Otherwise, have you considered getting a new stereo for your car? There are adapters for most cars that let you replace a factory radio with a standard DIN style stereo. I used a Scoche adapter plate to put a standard AM/FM/CD with USB port in my daughters old Taurus.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Sep 2016 14:31:45 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

I have ever heard of until almost a decade later. I was a fairly early adopter, having a MP3 player in my car in 1999 but it was a DOS PC on an inverter, playing through a cassette adapter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmm... I didn't consider that. My oldest MP3's are from 2007, so you're probably right.
You're probably looking at a new stereo.
Or, connect your smart phone/MP3 player to a portable speaker in the car. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 05:20:25 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

I still think the best MP3 player anywhere is a PC running DOS and MPXPLAY. (what I ran in my cars from 1999 to a couple years ago).The problem is the last machine I had that will suffer the heat of a car in the summer is socket 7 board based and finding a good one is pretty hard to do. I have given up on PC based car players. MPXPLAY allows selecting songs by number from a numeric pad and I still have not seen that from any other player, stand alone or PC based. You can run a 10 key without taking your eyes off the road. Try that with a factory MP3 player. Set up with fast boot in the BIOS, running DOS and it will go from "key on" to music faster that any dash mounted player I have seen. There is a W/XP version and that is the player in the house.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a 2006 Scion Xb. The CD player also does MP3s. Physically, the CD can hold upward of 700 MP3 tracks at the default bit rate.
Unfortunately, the CD player must have an 8Bit CPU poorly programmed, because the player only recognizes the first 255 tracks on the CD.
Still, 250 tracks per CD is quite a lot and I no longer suffer through radio commercials.

I'm surprised at the number of high end cars I've been in that can't handle data CDs (MP3s). Congrats to Toyota for the player in the Scion. The car also has IPOD and AUX ports but the MP3 CDs do the job just fine.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would be either a very, very low bit rate or very very short MP3s.
At 128 kbps an MP3 will require a bit more than 1/12 the space it would if not compressed; i.e, if a fully filled 700 MB CD has 10 tracks, and if tracks of the same lengths were compressed to MP3 at 128 kbps, a 700 MB CD would hold 110-120 MP3s.
Personally, I find 128 kbps acceptable - many do not - but I wouldn't want to go much lower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

my car as we speak.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

All this talk led me to examine the CDs I've been creating. Looks like I've been creating Monaural CDs without knowing it. Maybe that explains why I'm getting 250+ tracks per CD:
Audio file with ID3 version 2.3.0, contains: MPEG ADTS, layer III, v1, 64 kbps, 44.1 kHz, Monaural
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


The 64 kbps would have something to do with it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DadiOH wrote: "Personally, I find 128 kbps acceptable - many do not - but I wouldn't want to go much lower. "
Seriously???
I use 192kbps MINIMUM for MP3 export - even for spoken word projects.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are certainly free to do use whatever bit rate you want but 192 is WAY overkill for voice. For music, it depends on several factors...
a) what encoder is used and how
b) what equipment you are using. High end ear phones or tinny built in PC speakers.
c) how you are listening. That is, are you listening intently while you sip a nice single malt scotch or are you listening in a noisy environment - like a car - or elsewhere while you are doing something else. If the former you might like FLAC or similar better than 192.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

These days I use 320kbps for everything, as the difference in file sizes is only a few MB and that's insignificant these days.
Many years ago I was tasked with encoding sermon's for a church. I used the True Speech codec which could encode an hour speech to a very small file size. Not so good for music, but it worked great for speech.
Of course, I recently looked at the website for that church and they now use MP4 video files at hundreds of MB each. :) Times change.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many of my older MP3's are encoded at 128 kbps, but I can definitely hear the quality difference compared to 256 kbps or 320 kbps MP3's.
Storage space isn't much of an issue anymore, so I use 320 kbps for everything now.
A 7MB MP3 is nothing compared to a 50GB video file. :)
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Sep 2016 14:31:45 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

try.

Yea, a new stereo is something I have considered. What does "DIN" mean?
One reason I try to avoid replacing the factory stereos, is because they wont fit the faceplate hole, dont mount to the same screw holes, and require a dozen or more wires to be traced and spliced. -OR- an expensive wiring adaptor, and that still dont eliminate the faceplate and mounting screw issues.
On top of that, will the new one have a clock? My factory one does, and I nearly demand a clock in my vehicles.
Back in the 70's I installed a lot of aftermarket stereos. But back then, it was usually 7 wires. POS - GND - Left Spkr + & - Right spkr + & - and one wire for a light.
And back then, if they did not fit in the dash where the factory radio went, they had brackets to mount under the dash. (Back then there was a lot of room under the dash). And in those older cars, the clock was usually NOT part of the radio.
Another thing is that they often lower the value of the car for resale, if the dash is hacked up to make the thing fit.
However, in this case, if I can find something that will at least mount properly and not leave a hole in the dash, or require hacking/cutting the dash, I would not mind changing it as long as it also has a clock. The reason I'd do it, is mostly because this radio has extremely poor FM reception. I googled this, and found this was a common problem on this vehicle. It's not the antenna or antenna connections either. I did remove the stereo to make sure the antenna was properly connected and plugged in another antenna to make sure the antenna itself was not at fault. The google results said that the front end circuitry for FM was known to fail. (and mine apparently has). I am lucky if I can get the local FM station, and that is the only one I get.
I really dont much care about the radio though. I find radio these days to be lousy, mostly commercials, repeated 10 songs, and the station drift when I travel makes me quickly turn the radio off.
So, just having a CD player is a big PLUS. All my older cars had radio only, or a cassette player, and casettes were always troublesome, and no one even uses them anymore. Of course it seems that most stores no longer sell CDs either. But since I like oldies music, I find lots of CDs at resale stores and rummage sales for a buck or less. So, this CD player is a big improvement over anything else I had in former vehicles. But keeping the CDs in the car seems to be messy, since there is no place to store them. I finally bought a rubbermaid tub for them, but it stays in the rear seat area, so I end up listening to the same CD over and over, until I stop driving.... Yet, this is still better than the crap on the radio !!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/24/2016 11:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:
[snip]

I don't know all of it, but I think the D is Deutsche (German).
My father listened to classical music a lot, and one of the things I heard a lot was "Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft" (German Record Company).
[snip]
--
92 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Deutsches Institut für Normung
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

- there are single din, half din, 1 1/2 din and double din devices. The standard is set by Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V. (German Institute for Standardization).
Din standard connectors are generally round multi-pin connectors like the old keyboard plugs
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/24/2016 09:25 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
[snip]

I remember a stereo tape deck that had a 5-pin DIN connector for all the audio connections (2 input, 2 output).
--
91 days until the winter celebration (Sunday December 25, 2016 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I remember seeing "DIN" used on old microphone jacks/plugs many years ago, but never knew what it meant. I just accepted it as the name for that plug type. I think the old round keyboard plugs were of a similar size (and even appearance). But I never knew the face plate size of car radios was also using "DIN" for it's size.
But now, I'm left with one huge question. What are the actual sizes of a FULL DIN (ONE DIN), one and a half DIN, Two DIN, and so on?????
Without running out to the car with a tape measure, I will make a guess that the face of my factory radio is 'about' 2 inches in height, and 6 inches wide..... And since I had it out of the dash recently, I know that the depth is important, bcause there is no spare room in back.
This is where it all gets confusing. How to know what will fit and what wont. This pretty much eliminates buying a stereo on Ebay or Amazon or Craigslist, since I will need to touch it, measure it, and so on. Then, once I buy it, I'll have to go to a store or go online to order the faceplate adaptor and wiring adaptor.
I have not shopped around much, but I see Walmart has some car stereos, and they are pricy. Add in the cost of the faceplates and wiring adaptors and this might end up costing $200 or more.... I dont really think I want to spend that kind of money on a 20 year old vehicle, just for a radio/stereo. I do plan to keep this car for awhile, and it's in very good condition for its age, but plans change as things break, and/or accidents occur, etc.... I know the stereo can be moved to another vehicle, but that means buying another wiring aadaptor. faceplate, etc.... The last time I saw those wiring adptors, they were upward around $50.
In the past, I'd toss a Boombox on my seat, toss in a cassette and have music that was also portable. Although those batteries did get costly. I wonder what portable devices they have now, and I do have an auto 12vdc to 120Vac inverter. I'm sure they make something like that which costs much less than $200.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.