Is there a "special" tool for moving dead brush 100 feet away?

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On Wed, 29 May 2013 10:38:40 -0700, Roy wrote:

You're a stronger man than I am, because it's fifty feet uphill, and the hill itself is overgrown and tangled, such that you fall with every step, most of the time doing a face plant since you're practically vertical with the slope.
It's hard to see the slope in this picture, but, it's there:

Under those conditions, while you apparently can carry loads of brush with your hands; I tried ... and I can't (effectively).
In fact, I can't even climb the hill empty handed, without grabbing onto tree limbs to keep from falling back down the hill. I tied a rope to hang onto, but then that left me only one free hand to carry all that brush up the hill with.
All I could do was "throw" the brush uphill, half the time it didn't make it all the way, so it tumbled back down upon me.
Since the space is penned in from every side but up, I just couldn't do it. If you can carry armloads of brush in those circumstances, all I can say is you're a (much) stronger man than I am.
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On 5/29/2013 11:20 AM, Danny D wrote:

it it up in a bundle with your 100' rope, walk uphill, and pull.
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On Wed, 29 May 2013 11:51:11 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

I'll try that next.
I had discounted that, in favor of the tarp, but the tarp caught on so much brush that it wouldn't budge.
Likewise with the bucket. It kept flipping over and spilling its contents.
Thanks
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DADD- Ever wonder why downhill skiing is so much easier than uphill?
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On Thu, 30 May 2013 07:59:57 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

This particular section is hemmed in on all sides by forest and terrain, none of which is near a roadway.
The only roadway is the top of the hill, which is 50 feet above the debris.
So there are only two choices: a) Leave the debris where it lies (fire hazard notwithstanding) b) Tote the debris uphill (as hard as that is)
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Important piece of information missing... What prompted the desire to create the debris?
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On Thu, 30 May 2013 21:30:51 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

Know thine enemy, and know thyself, and in a hundred battles, you will prevail (Sun Tzu).
I am trying to eradicate three enemy combatant species which have taken over acres of chaparral in my control, namely: 1. Scotch Broom <== foreign invader 2. Spanish Broom <== foreign invader 3. Poison Oak <== native irritant
Those fast-growing invaders from the Mediterranean islands quickly crowd out the native inhabitants, even to the point of photosynthesizing from their very stems, so as to suck the life-giving supplies from the mouths of the native plants that actually feed the native animals.
The strengths of these nitrogen fixers is that they can grow where no other plants can; and that they sow seeds which last for 60 years, a percentage growing every year.
The weakness of the Scotch Broom is a relatively meager supply line, via a single tap root, which holds tenaciously in the summer months, but which yields like cutting warmed butter in the wetness of the winter rains.
So, every winter, I spend a few hours blissfully hunting Scotch Broom, destroying entire regiments of the stuff, leaving the wounded to die & decay where they lie on the slippery mud-soaked slopes (war is mud, after all).
Each spring, the lower-hugging guerrilla Spanish Broom, which is much harder to flush out, even in the winter rains, shows its true colors by blossoming a sweet yellow, which removes all vestiges of camouflage. I've learned that to mow them down is merely to invite a rebirth from the stumps, so, the approach is to methodically cut and spray with chemical warfare (glyphosate), within 5 minutes of the dismembering. This, and only this, prevents the roots from springing forth anew, to attack my sunlit hillsides.
The most formidable enemy is the native Poison Oak, which fortresses in almost impenetrable thickets of wrist-thick vines, covering every direction. For these, I carefully cut a swatch through the minefield, taking extreme care not to become contaminated too badly, although casualties are inevitable. At times, I use the chainsaw, in sheer determined all-out frontal attacks; but most of the time I stealthily tunnel to the commanding root, which is always at least four or five inches thick, to kill the command and control center, at its very core.
Note: Those who say you can spray glyphosate on poison oak have no idea what they're up against, as this enemy is so deeply entrenched on a hillside that napalm itself wouldn't flush it all out, in a week of spraying from helicopters. No. Only a determined single-minded attack on the core supply line will work, sort of like what the Persons attempted at the battle north of Plateae before the Greeks retreated and regrouped at Plateae, for the battle that arguably saved the Western civilized world from utter destruction.
And, so goes my battle with the foreign and native invaders, who are forever attempting to take over my sun drenched hillsides.
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On 5/31/2013 11:10 AM, Danny D wrote:

removing groundcover sometimes leads to massive erosion problems.
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On Fri, 31 May 2013 12:47:17 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Bummer that nobody brought this up until now.
If that's the case, I perhaps should have followed this suggestion: "bundle the pulled plants to create 8- to 12-inch wattles that can besecured to slopes to prevent erosion." http://www.cal-ipc.org/ip/management/wwh/pdf/19633.pdf
Paradoxically, these pests were originally planted to *prevent* erosion: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/pdf/pnw/pnw103.pdf
Unfortunately, all parts of the plant are poisonous: http://wiki.bugwood.org/Cytisus_scoparius
And, the CDFA says they're a Class C pest, which means they're: “troublesome, aggressive, intrusive, detrimental, or destructive ...and difficult to control or eradicate.” http://californiarangeland.ucdavis.edu/Publications%20pdf/8049%20Brooms%20in%20Calif.pdf
Here is how I removed the scotch broom in the winter season:
1. The task was to weed about an acre of these weeds:

2. I first got below the weed on the hillside & grasped low:

3. Then I pulled DOWNWARD with all my strength, always downhill:

4. With the ground saturated by rain, the weeds came out:

5. As predicted, the Spanish Broom was the hardest to pull:

6. Some of the plant roots were as thick as a fat thumb:

7. However most of the thousand of plants pulled had thin roots:

8. And now the muddy hillside is devoid of the weed plants:

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The real bummer? In all your OCD-ness.... you often miss the forest. :( It's really too bad that accounting training & experience translates so poorly to other endeavors. :(
My apologies if I missed the rational that motivated messing with plants that generated all this debris.... seems like a grout scraping activity.
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On Wed, 29 May 2013 11:22:39 -0700, Oren wrote:

Hmmm... maybe.
Or a vineyard.
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Obviously that is your case. However most people can learn to pick up a few sticks and move them at the same time they are just doing it.
Nevertheless, as some point out, your posts are a hoot. Great for a laugh and to make most of us very glad that we aren't you.
Now, try to figure out how to make some trusses for your tool shed.
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Isn't it great when you have someone to ridicule? Makes it so easy to forget your own shortcomings.
--
Dan Espen

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On Tue, 28 May 2013 18:46:34 +0000, JoeBro wrote:

I was hoping for a better way.
In fact, I'm praying for a better way, because I still have about a hundred linear feet of slop to clear where the roadway is UPHILL fifty feet ... which has to be done this week.
I'm thinking of just throwing the darn things uphill but then they'll clutter the roadway and be a hazard.
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On Tue, 28 May 2013 08:52:49 -0700, Oren wrote:

It's gonna match the architecture of the house!
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On Tue, 28 May 2013 13:15:27 -0700, Oren wrote:

A man cave?
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wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQPGJSIq3ys

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Well, you wanted a *real* man cave...
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On Sun, 26 May 2013 19:37:12 +0000, Danny D wrote:

To recap the thread, the suggested tool that worked the best in my downhill situation was the tarp.
The only thing left was to cull out all this frail stuff so as to protect the wood chippers from breathing poison oak:

But, pulling out a few dozen vines out of a brush pile was a trivially easy task, and, was basically the gift wrapping for the wood chippers to make life just a bit safer for them:

They were scheduled for yesterday, but, maybe they'll come today.
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On Sunday, May 26, 2013 3:37:12 PM UTC-4, Danny D wrote:

It's called a wheelbarrow.
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