Installing new vacuum breaker on a hose bib


Two days ago I didn't know what they were and had never seen one before (thanks to folks here for enlightening me). So today I installed my first vacuum breaker (aka anti-siphon device) on a customer's hose bib.
It was something of a bitch. I noticed the setscrew on the new one I bought, but couldn't see or feel any such screw on the old one, just a round bump. So I just torqued the shit out of it with a pipe wrench (crescent wrench holding the valve body). I threaded the new breaker on, then tightened the setscrew. After just a few turns, it promptly broke off, apparently just as it was designed to do (I could see it had a narrow shank).
So what's the deal with these? Are you expected to replace the hose bib and vacuum breaker as a unit when either one fails? After breaking off the setscrew, there's no way in hell to get it out. (Wrenching it off did chew up the threads some, but there was enough left to secure hold the new breaker.)
The man at my plumbing supply place said he understood that inspectors in Berkeley and Oakland were requiring these on new residential construction (they're been required for commercial sites for some time now).
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On Thu 02 Oct 2008 09:25:32p, David Nebenzahl told us...

They're required in the Phoenix area. The ones we have do have visible set screws that appear can be removed. That's the only type I've seen.
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Wayne Boatwright
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SteveBell wrote: ...

And combining the low probability of occurrence w/ the likelihood of significant consequence as to be virtually nonsensical to worry about.
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The bad news is that in Cary NC a couple of years ago, everyone had to use bottled water due to contamination by bad plumbing at one house.

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Art wrote:

That would be the non-zero part of the problem.
The hose in the pool is really low-danger. The guy spraying for bugs with a hose-end sprayer is more of a danger. A little extra chlorine or algae won't cause much havoc. A dose of insecticide in the water main has a much larger negative potential.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Art wrote:

... I looked it up -- that was owing to the City/Wake County mistakenly connecting treated sewage water to the supply lines. Nothing whatsoever a hose bib vacuum breaker is going to to against that.
I stand by my previous assertion it's a nearly non-existent problem--in fact, I'd be interested if anyone could find a single documented incident of any significance.
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