Indoor dryer vent "heaters"?

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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

which
gallon
take
Which is ever so more respectable than obfuscating bullshit, of which I bow to you, the master.

possibly
take
energy.
process?
sort of

I think you are a boob. You're the self-proclaimed master of physics and yet you haven't figured out that there is no need to add ludicrous amounts of moisture to the living space in the first place, and therefore no need to condense it. A simple air to air heat exchanger rigged from fintube or similarly simple solution would suffice, but I wouldn't necessarily recommend that either as any obstruction in the dryer vent will collect lint and become a fire hazard.
You've got the knowledge but not the wisdom, or apparently the experience, to self-edit. You make astoundingly obvious errors in your computations, horrendous assumptions and promote designs that would make Rube Goldberg swoon. I hope you got the full ride for you education, because brother if you paid for it you got screwed.
BTW, the word is renowned, not renouned.
R
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Simple bullshit.

You are right in the sense that condensing the water would save more energy. Do you have any comments about the practicality or physics of that process? I suspect We could use more thermal mass with less surface and some sort of simple external radiator. What do you think about that?
Nick
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You STILL don`t get it Nick, OP does Not want more humidity. Get IT. So your whole humidity thread is irrelevant to the OP. likewise here.
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No way. At the moment, I'm struggling to understand Example 26 in
http://www.vok.lth.se/~ht/COURSES/MMV/mvk160/Mass%20Transfer%20hp.pdf
with the help of Tom Richard's Cornell composting web site which more or less explains the mysterious equation 11.57 for the D12 water vapor diffusion constant in air and its 1.68 exponent based on mixed molecular degrees of freedom. This is important for lower-energy humidification with basement moisture diffusing upstairs. Bouyancy seems unimportant in this case. What do you think, having posed as a qualified technical critic?

The nominal 4" d x 12" tall bottles aren't full, and there's no drum lid. The bottom bottles should be inverted to facilitate air distribution. Given the large heat transfer coefficient for laminar film condensation, we might put more thermal mass and less surface inside the drum, with some sort of simple external radiator to dump heat into air. How much surface do you think we need in the drum, in your expert opinion?

Hex tiling of circles packs about 9% more than than a square grid, and slightly squished circles do better, in my vast drum-bottle- packing experience (one drum :-)
Nick
"In the land of the cross-eyed, the nearsighted man is king." --me
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That's the reason for the condensing humidity trap :-)
Consider getting a clue or hiding your ignorance.
Nick
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That's off-topic, vs the subject at hand.

Au contraire. Avoiding that while conserving heat is the goal, altho 12 pounds of water (in a typical laundry load, IIRC) is not a ludicrous amount compared to Andersen's estimate that a typical family of 4 evaporates 2 gallons per day.

It's now quite clear that you know little about this subject :-)
Nick
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lets just assume it works without harming anything. no moisture problems, no lint problems, no fire hazzard, it just works.
its not going to save you any significant amount of money. i mean you could bottle your fart gas and find a way to feed it into the furnace, with the side benefit of having less fart smell in your house.
but is it worth it?
randy

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could
And in reality, it could cost more to run....

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Nick your such an idiot, no matter what contraption you make you will add moisture OP does Not want. You are a hopeless fool on a hopeless quest. Your numbers remind me of the builders of the Hubble telescope that refused testing it before throwing that junk into orbit, gee , just taking it outside for a try would have saved a billion, how dumb. And the cure was figured out by a guy taking a shower seeing how the shower arm would swing down. What a joke you are your math always leaves out a few parameters that real life testing provides. Your like a bad computer program, Garbage in = Garbage Out.
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It's time to ignore you now, since you have nothing relevant to say. Meanwhile, a clue: English has two words that sound like "your" :-)
Nick
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the
How so? If I'm running the dryer anyway why would it cost more to send the exhaust heat into my house vs. to the outside?
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well for one, moist air takes more energy to heat. once you pump all that moisture in it is harder to heat later. so your furnace works harder.
randy
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I think you will find it works less, if you use actual numbers.
Nick
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wrote:

prove it.
randy
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No thanks.
Nick
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i honestly dont think you can...
randy
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You might enjoy attempting to prove your claim with Actual Numbers :-)
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

harder.
:-)
Like the Actual Numbers (funny, I never knew that phrase was a proper noun) in your volume calculation? How do you get that ~ 66 gallons of volume in a 55 gallon drum (~57 gallons volume actual)? Don't you find it just a wee bit hypocritical to spout off about Actual Numbers when your inaccuracy with Actual Numbers makes them more on the order of ~actual ~numbers?
But those numbers don't really matter, do they? Not really. They're just indicative of your sloppiness in thinking things through. If your numbers were totally screwed up and the thing worked, that'd be fine by me. But...
You'd written this in another post:

ludicrous
A gallon and a half of water in a load of spun dry laundry? I can buy that. It takes about 40 minutes to dry a load. At what rate does the water condense in Rube's Water Barrel Boondoggle? Is it going to take out ~5 ounces of water per minute? Not even close. Your average electric dehumidifier won't do that, and they're far more efficient at removing water than your system. Particularly when there's hot air blowing over the just-condensed water and heating the water bottles further reducing the efficiency of condensation over time.
Basically you've gotten some exercise assembling the thing, occupied that annoying totally useless empty floor space in the basement, kept some plastic water bottles out of a landfill (I'm all for that), and you're still pumping excess moisture and lint into your house.
Next time you have the urge to save some energy, get the 5 cent deposit per bottle (10 cents in MI) and spend it on some weatherstripping for your house.
R
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Already answered. May I suggest you learn to read more carefully?

I have no idea what you are talking about.

I have no idea what you are talking about.

You have no idea what I am talking about.
Dehumidifers are different. Since they use electrical energy, they are infinitely less energy-efficient and have much lower peak capacities than passive condensing systems with heat storage.

Hey, let's have some numbers! :-)
Nick
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RubeGoldberg's-illegitimate-son-nicksanspam@ece.2nd-rate-school-at-best-villanova.edu wrote:

drum...?
Odd, I didn't see that post until you reposted it. May I suggest you not blather like an idiot and get your posts cancelled? Maybe if your railed about censorship that would help.

Obviously. The sad thing is that you also have no idea what _you_ are talking about.
I'll simplify for you: What is the maximum rate of condensation per time unit for your Mr. Wizard experiment?

5 ounces. In this instance it's a smallish measurement of liquid volume. About the size of those little rugrat-sized milk containers you get at lunch from your cafeteria lady.

more
To my great horror and pitying amusement, I actually do know what you're talking about. You just happen to be full of compost.

are
I didn't mention energy efficient. I said efficient at removing water. My point being that although you misguidedly feel that you've discovered the free lunch, you haven't. But we may be getting somewhere.
Off-the shelf appliance grade dehumidifiers rate their pint-per-day dehumidification capacities at 80F with 60% relative humidity. A 50 pint per day dehumidifier is rated to remove about 1/4 gallon of water per hour. You're trying to tell me that your system is six times more efficient than an active system's rating? If that was true you wouldn't be posting here. Everyone would know of it and be using it. Everyone. You'd be on the cover of Popular Science at the very least.
You mentioned peak capacities of electric and passive condensing. Since you are trying to sell the OP on your system, tell him what condensation rate he can expect with your system. There's no recirculation system in your barrel. Air gets blown in and blows right out. So that dehumidification process must operate pretty damn quickly. Exactly how quickly? Will it remove 12 pounds of water in 40 minutes?
R
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