If it works, they outlaw it

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Greetings,
Long long ago they made paint for numbers on watches which somehow used radioactivity to glow for years. They also used it on instrument dials in planes, etc. It was not dangerous when used for its intended purpose just as your radioactive smoke detectors in your house are not a danger to you. Is there still a legal means to obtain this paint or to make it? Does anyone know what it is called?
Thanks, William
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

It's a shame they prohibited lead solder for tin cans and potable water supply. It flowed so well.
R
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.... but you can still buy lead solder if you want it....
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

Rather tough to build a bomb with lead. There are inconveniences in life brought about by trying to restrict making things too easy for people offing themselves or others.
R
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

Its called Radioluminescent Paint. Google it.
--
Grandpa

What is that dripping from my fingers?
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On 14 May 2006 20:28:13 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com"

Yes, my brother had a clock with a radium dial.

I'm not sure that was true.
I think I have the clock now, and I have no children.

You can still get fluorescent paint, that glows in the dark if it got enough light during the day. Any decent paint department I think, although I only bought a little bottle once 30 years ago because at night I kept walking into the edge of one of my French doors in my apartment in Brooklyn, NY. If I had walked into the door itself, it wouldn't have hurt so bad, but it didn't work out that way.
I painted the top half of the edge with the paint, and it glowed all night, and I never walked into it again. It looks white in the light. I'm haven't heard that its color could be changed.

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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

As I recall, lots of women who worked in the factories ended up with mouth cancer as a result of pointing their brushes with their tongues.
--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
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On 14 May 2006 20:28:13 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com"

In the 60s when I worked at the Bureau of Radliological Health we had to dispose of about 1000 army stop watches with radium dials. They treated them like a fairly high risk material. I know a survey meter would go off when you got close to the container they were in. One issue with users is when you put the watch in your pants pocket, next to your "deal".
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com writes:

The better modern version is tritium lights such as are used on gun sights.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

/begin quote: The major disadvantage to tritium is the evaporation rate, and most tritium paint only lasts 7-8 years before it becomes too dim to be useful. While GTLS tubes last longer, they still become uselessly dim sooner than one would like.
Because of the complex licensing and export issues with tritium, and the inherent limited lifetime of tritium paint and GTLS, most watchmakers today use SuperLuminova. It's a photoluminescent paint, and when charged up from a UV source (sunlight, fluorescent light) is able to emit a fairly bright glow up to six hours after exposure. And the lack of ionizing radiation makes it an easier sell in our paranoid culture. (Though the paint itself may be more toxic than tritium!) /end quote.
the above from: http://www.uglx.org/radwatch
-- Grandpa
What is that dripping from my fingers? Why it looks like time.
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com wrote:

It would appear that the professionals disagree with your opinion.

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Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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wrote:

Living causes dying. We should prohibit sex because it causes death.
Bob
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But what a way to go!
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wrote:

Nobody gets out of this life alive......
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toilets used to work great before the government added water flow rules.
have a friend with a old army radio with original glow in dark meters.
the stuff must of decayed nealy no glow anymore...
the workers got cancer a lot from the paint, just add a night light
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That was back about 30 or more years ago. I remember it contained phosphorous, which glows when radiated. Beyond that, I'm not much help. Did you google search?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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On Mon, 15 May 2006 12:36:59 GMT, "Stormin Mormon"

Ummm. No I don't think so.
Phosphorous may glow a little if exposed to oxygen - shortly before it explodes.
Phosphorous will burn quite well when exposed to air. No doubt it could glow if irradiated -it would depend on how much and by what.
White Phosphorous was used in early matchsticks and covered in wax to prevent exposure - cowboys striking matches on their boots to remove the wax layer. Safety matches are made of red phosphorous - not quite as volatile.
Phosphorous was a very popular weapon during both World Wars and the Korean War. A spattering of phosphorous on the skin would burn all the way to the bone and just keep on going.
It has never been used in watch faces - then again maybe in the 1960s by the Bulgarians....
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Heh.
Television/computer CRTs and radium watch faces work through the use of _phosphors_ - phosphorous containing compounds that glow when irradiated by something.
With CRTs, phosphors are deposited on the backside of the face glass, and glows when hit by the electron beam from the yoke.
With radium watch faces, they simply mix phosphors with the (teensy amounts) of radium.
Phosphors come in many colours.

Pure phosphorous comes in two forms. White phosphorous which is spontaneously flammable in air _below_ body temperature. The ignition point is below 37C. Under normal circumstances, if you touch white phosphorous it _will_ ignite.
Red phosphorous is quite a bit more stable.
White phosphorous is usually stored in water. Red phosphorous doesn't need such precautions.
Old "non-safety" matches are NOT made out of white phosphorous. If they were, they'd ignite in your pocket.
To give you an idea of how self-ignitive white phosphorous is:
Dissolve white phosphorous in carbon disulphide (about the only thing it _will_ dissolve in). Soak up some of the liquid in a paper filter (or even paper towel).
Lay the filter out on something non-flammable. The CS2 will evaporate very quickly leaving pure white phosphorous behind. At temperatures above around 25C, it will self-ignite.
In WWII, some incendiaries were simply paper dipped in CS2/white phosphorous solutions. The CS2 would evaporate shortly after popped out of the drop cannister. In more than one occasion, civilians, thinking they were leaflets dropped by the allies, would surrepititiously pick them up and put them in their pockets so they could read them later. Minutes later, they'd ignite.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On Mon, 15 May 2006 14:14:30 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Quite right. The keyword being "compound". Phosphors used in CRTs etc are not phosphorous, they are compounds of phosphorous with totally different characteristics to the elemental form.

Incorrect.
White phosphorous was indeed used in matches between about 1830 and 1910. It was eventually banned because of the health risk it caused. It is very poisonous. There was enough white phosphorous in one matchbook to poison a healthy man. It was mixed with various gums and waxes along with, I think, antimony and some other compounds. Indeed they often exploded in peoples pockets, but that is not why they went out of production.

Next time I have a supplies of white phosphorous and carbon disuphide in my kitchen I will give that a go.

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Actually Chris we are quite wrong. The Phosphors used in CRTs almost never contain phosphorous. They are compounds of all sorts of things that give the required emissions when stimulated. Phosphorous is just not a major contributor.
for example
http://www.phosphor-technology.com/products/crt.htm
I guess you were just all up wrong on this and the matches.
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