Identify faucet stem brand/part name


I had a leak at the main shutoff valve coming into the house. It just seemed to be leaking around the stem, but it was hard to tell. So I called the city and $60 (this blows my mind) later they shut off my water. I went to Home Depot to try and find a replacement stem, which was a futile effort. So I ended up buying some new stem packing. This seems to have solved the problem, as another $60 later I'm leak free. In hind sight, tightening the packing nut might have solved my problem. But the Flax/graphite combo in the packing nut seemed pretty dried out.
I'd like to have one of these on hand for future disasters, not to mention my own T-Wrench (probably illegal). Given the speed with which the city reacted to my original call, I'd hate to have water gushing into my basement. (Finally the question) The valve is actually in an elbow that is threaded on one end and slip on the other. The stem threads into the top of the elbow. It is probably an 1.25" where it screws into the valve and only has about 1/8" of thread. The valve is about 30 years old. What is this type of valve called and who might the manufacturer be?
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See if HD has the t-wrench. If so, its probably legal. You can also ask the city if you can do it yourself to avoid the $60 charge. In GA (were I used to live), everybody had one, no problem.
My guess would be that its no problem for you to have the wrench and use it.
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Rich Greenberg N Ft Myers, FL, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 239 543 1353
Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM\'er since CP-67
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Bill Stock wrote:

It's hard to tell the type of valve from your description. It sounds like it is not a ball valuve, which I would recommend replacing your main shut-off valve (and any other shut-off valve that you care about) with a ball valve at your next opportunity; they last a *long* time without going bad.
Regarding the outside shut off that the water department used, was it marked above ground or have a visible cover to get to it? If my shut off inside the house ever fails, or the run of pipe before the shut off ever fails, I'm at the mercy of my water department to come out and *find* the shut off. For some reason the shut offs (assuming it exists) in my 1960s era neighborhood are well covered over. I'm very curious to know where it is, and I'd be willing to install a cover so it can be accessed quickly if needed.
By the way, did the water department charge you another $60 turn the water back on? Having your own wrench seems like a good idea, you should be able to find them at a decent plumbing house.
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[...]
I concurr.

Is your water metered? Do you know where the meter is? The shut-off valve is USUALLY right next to the meter. If its the type which needs the T-Handle wrench, it will appear (from above) to be a metal bar about 2-3 inches long and 1/4 wide. If you are in an area of hard freezes, the valve itself may be several feet down, below the frost line. You may have to do some searching.

Or at the borg.
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Rich Greenberg N Ft Myers, FL, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 239 543 1353
Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM\'er since CP-67
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wrote:

I was thinking about this after I sent the message, it's just an angle stop like on a toilet shutoff. Only much bigger.

Yes, they dinged me another $60 to turn it back on. I don't know if it's $60 per trip or $60 per turn. LOL. So if my repair had leaked, would I be out another $60 + $60. Fortunately I did not need to find out and the guy did not wait around in any event.
Yes water is metered, but the shutoff valve is buried well below ground (frost line) at the street and the meter is inside the house. I gather the $60 is a deterrent to prevent DIY from annoying them, but you'd think they'd waive it for emergencies.
Since I'm in Canada, it probably is illegal to DIY. Otherwise the guvermint couldn't make a buck.
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wrote:

the valve off, remove the handle, then unscrew the bonnet. If the valve is not a common modern valve you will probably have to check with a plumber or plumbing supply house to find one. I would think it will probably outlast the rest of the plumbing.
Don Young
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Rich Greenberg wrote:

Yes, I have a water meter, it is inside the house just after my indoor shut-off. (There is a remote display outside for the semi-annual meter reading). I'm just wonder if and where an outside shut-off exists underneath my front lawn.
There's gotta be something down there, I'd assume. Since i'm in a cold winter area, it's probably too deep for a metal detector to find.
By the way, if an underground shut off fails, how do they fix it?
Another question, if the water line fails between the street and your house, who is usually responsible for repair with a typical municipal water system? I know the gas company takes responsibility for the gas line all the way to the gas meter, and sometimes further if they are in a good mood.
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I asked this question when I called to have the water shut off and they said anything after the street was my responsibility to fix. It sounded like this included the shut off at the street. So if that pipe rusts out I'd have to dig up the lawn, sprinklers, side walk, shrubbery, etc. I imagine a price tag between 5K - 10K with the insane contracting fees around here now. I suppose insurance might cover this?
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around here all underground utilities are homeowners responsiblity from curb shut off on.
leaky gas lines are expensive to replace, no repairs allowed and no homeowners insurance doesnt cover this cost.
in my area terracotta sewer lines are failing with homes 60 years old 8 to 10 grand for replacement.
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Bill Stock wrote:

Yikes. The gas company replaced our line a few years ago when we could smell gas. There was no charge to us, nor was there a charge when the outside regulator failed . I'm guessing we wouldn't be so lucky if the water pipe leaked underground, but as long as water was getting through and it wasn't causing a flood, what incentive would the homeowner have to fix a leak? The meter is inside the house :)
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Exactly what I was thinking. As long as I'm not paying for the leak (metered) and it's not undermining the foundation, it's their loss.
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