I'm getting worried - electrical work

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I'm upgrading my panel from 100A to 200A and started checking into the paperwork needed. After talking to the inspector and the utility I'm starting to get worried.
Everyone is being very cooperative!
The inspector was very helpful and told me all of my grounding requirements.
Then I called the electric company and the guy faxed me a form while I was on the phone with him. He walked me through filling it out and I faxed it back to him. Then he even called me back to see if I needed the paperwork done today!
The electric company will cut the power and hook it back up once I change the meter socket, which they provide. The inspector will work with me to time this for a short interuption since they need to sign off before the power is turned back on. And the electric company won't charge me a fee unless I want to do this on a weekend or holiday.
This is a much different experience then I had last year when all I was doing was replacing a mud sill. Hopefully the atcual turn-off, inspection, and turn on will go as smotthly as it seems it will. So it looks like I will be able to upgrade my panel to 200A for less than $300 and only a few hours of 'down time'. The only two expensive items are going to be the panel and the 65' of 4ga for grounding.
whodathunk it would be this easy...
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Who is giving you the service entrance cable, standpipe, weatherhead, and fittings?
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Underground service to my house and my town inspector said it wouldn't need to be changed.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 12:45:14 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor

That really surprises me. Do you know what size wire you have?
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wrote:

The vast majority when the services were put underground were provisioned for 200 amps, regardless what the service installed was. They wired them all the same - why scimp, it's going to be there a LONG time, and changing it down the road is NOT going to be cheap.
Around here the electrical utility owns the wire to the meter base
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On 1/13/2010 21:30, Metspitzer wrote:

No surprise in my area. If you increase a service capacity for no specific reason the electric company will just reconnect you to the existing drop. The only time they will increase cable size is if you provide them with your new load requirements that show an increase that would require the change.
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I'm sure it varies wildly from area to area. Where I am that 's pretty much the case for overhead services. The utility companies typically own the overhead from the pole to the house, provided it's within around 125' from their pole. They run 1/0 aluminum, and use it for whatever size service you have. If it's underground, sometimes the utility company owns it, and sometimes the property owner owns it. If it's utility company owned, they'll typically use it for whatever your load, but if the property owner owns it, you need to upgrade it to meet Nec standards.
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On 1/14/2010 18:30, RBM wrote:

Around here the utility requires that you install conduit from the meter base to the pole or pad per their spec. They supply/install the conductors. They previously allowed direct burial cable that they supplied but too many people cut corners.
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Damn, in downstate NY, ConEd requires HDPE conduit from meter to pad or pole, which the electrician furnishes at customer expense, along with the conductors and meter socket. The only thing the utility furnishes is the meter, which they hydraulic lock into the customers meter socket with a case hardened ring. In fact, I'm amazed at situations like this OP, who is having the utility company disconnect and reconnect the service. Where I am, the electrician is responsible to furnish the connectors, as well as disconnect and reconnect the service.
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And the disconnect is a reasonably new requirement as far as houses go.
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RBM wrote:

I suppose it varies. In my town, the utility company unlocks the meter and notes the meter-reading. You - or your electrician - can remove the meter at leisure. Ultimately, the utility company re-connects the seal and records the reading again.
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The part I was actually thinking about is the cable from the meter to the panel.
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wrote:

That gets sized to table 310.15(B)(6) and the customer owns it
For 200a it is 2/0 copper or 4/0 aluminum
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I believe the OP said that he was replacing that.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 10:31:20 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor

That sounds about like how it went for me. Since I was able to build the new service before hand, (I would be using the existing as a sub panel), it was really about a 1 hour down time. they cut the old service, swung it over and hooked it up. My new panel was already inspected and marked OK for temporary service. I was able to rework the old panel at my leisure with the feeder breaker off and still have power from the new main panel on extension cords for the fridge and work lights..
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On Jan 13, 2:06pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That part is still a little fuzzy I'll talk to the inspector more about the exact timing since my new panel is going in the same spot as the old. Worse comes to worse I can to the socket upgrade, get it turned back on, then pull the meter to swap the panel.
What I plan on doing is getting up early that day and pulling the meter before I get shut off. Put up the new panel then if I feel safe enough run the new wires for the panel feed. That way all I should have to do is swap the meter pan/socket after they shut me off. Then call everybody back to get it inspected and turned back on.
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Plan on a long-ass extension cord and a friendly neighbor. You may need some power while yours is down (to run a drill).
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Aren't you going to need to upgrade the actual service entrance cable, both from the meter socket to the panel, and from the pole to the meter socket? I didn't see that mentioned in your summary above.
nate
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Limp Arbor wrote:

It's even easier in some places.
Here, it just takes a telephone call to the power company - no forms to fill out.
And there's no inspections or permits.
But you're right: $300 and a few hours of your time is certainly cheaper than the (roughly) $1,300.00 that an electrical contracting company would charge.
Here's a couple of hints:
* Take several pictures of the existing set-up with your digital camera before you begin. * Label each of the wires with a number and note to which size breaker each numbered wire belongs. * Start early in the morning. You'll probably have to make a trip or two to the box store for some odd nut or fitting. * You MAY need a metal hole-saw, depending on where the house wiring is supposed to enter the box. The boxes don't have knock-outs on the back. * There's a special lubricant or anti-oxidant paste that you should probably slather on the primary wires. * And be sure to tighten all the connecting screws double-tight - especially the primaries.
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Good tip. I wasn't expecting to need to drill the back.

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