i bought a table saw


Sears 10" with a little do hickey to tell me what the blade angle is. Should I open it or take it back? I'm about as knowledgable about table saws as George Bush is about .... nevermind, I might piss off someone who could help me. : -)
I've seen dados on tv and the ideas is interesting. Is that like a ___ on a scale of 1-10 for difficulty?
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On Fri, 9 Mar 2007 01:10:19 -0800, "AKA gray asphalt"

Forget about the dado unless you are doing a production run. Lots of set up time for a simple average hobby job. A router for cutting channels is far more convenient.
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If you are making a half dozen tenons, or four long rabbets, the dado blade makes it fast and accurate. Lots of choices that can get the same job done.
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: -) Good advice. I need to find out the name of that sharp thing right away. The idea of a direct drive vs belt drive (is it?) is interesting. That came up in the discussion but I don't know which I bought. I'm convinced that a router will be good for me for the near future.

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What model? Sears has them from about $129 to $1000. The cheap ones are OK for some work, but not very good for furniture building. The cheap ones cannot take a dado blade anyway. A good dado blade is in the $200 range. Check out www.infinitytools.com for good blades.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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On Fri, 9 Mar 2007 01:10:19 -0800, "AKA gray asphalt"

Throw it back and get a real President, err, tablesaw. Not too many good cabinet choices under $1000, but good brands include Delta, Powermatic, and General. Dados can be cut with a dado set or router bit. A stacked dado set is about $150. Stay away from Sears unless you are intested in screw drivers, wrenches, or other hand tools without moving parts.
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wrote:

Thanks. I didn't know how expensive dado sets were. That does steer me towards the router bit. How do I attach it to my table saw? Just kidding. : -)
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On Fri, 9 Mar 2007 01:10:19 -0800, "AKA gray asphalt"
wrote:

Why'd you get it in the first place?
I got no idea what you might wanna do with it, and scant idea which Sears table-saw you got, but ... why not set it up and investigate? This assumes you have shop-space and some time on your hands ...

A table saw is only moderately more complex than GWB's mental processes. You'll likely see much of it just setting it up. There's a cradle for raising/lowering the blade. Another for angling the blade. Pay attention because there are serious safety issues.

First familiarize yourself with basic TS operation. Get a feel for rip cuts, get a feel for crosscuts. Then study dado designs.
Good Luck, Puddin'
"Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim." - Bertrand Russell
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Thanks for the reminder. Stores are willing to sell you a very potentially hazardous product with little or no training. Table saws can take off a few fingers or even your wrist in fraction of a second. One slip and . . . . . .
Learn proper technique Use a push stick Never use the miter and fence at the same time as that is a potential for kickback Never get your hands near the blade. Be sure the fence is set up properly Never reach across the blade Never try to move a piece of wood away until the blade stops turning Never force wood that is binding as you push it. If in a garage or shed, be sure the phone is within reach. I keep a portable or my cell phone in my pocket.
There are many more things to check to be safe so take your time and read about them.
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Edwin kids not. This is all good advice.
From personal experience:
Always test a feed without power. If the wood binds, even a little, something's wrong. Keep some wax paper handy, rub on wood and table top as necessary to make feeds smooth and easy.
Don't apply hand pressure directly toward the blade. Always think what'd happen if your hand slipped and/or the work-piece flew up in the air.
P
"Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim." - Bertrand Russell
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Wow. Honest, that's a great list.
wrote in message

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I'm weird. After I get a tool or a new material, I get ideas about how to use them. I've been trying to talk myself into buying a box stapler for a few months because I think there are a lot of things I could do with double think cardboard. But the ideas won't come until I can actually do something with the tool. I bought some netting for one project and all of a sudde there is netting in every room in the house. I think this is boring for you, but that is part of the answer.
I'm going to cut latice to enclose the sides of a pation and Home Depot charges an arm and a leg (another reminder to be careful with the table saw : -) ... anyway I'm going to cut lattice. The idea of being able to bevel a 8 - 12 ft piece of lumber just sounds cool and full of possibilities, too.
The model I bought is 24885 and is direct drive. I think setting it up and investigating is a good idea. Thanks for the advice to all of you. It's cool when a newbie can get help without having to feel like a total fool.

That I will do. Thanks
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On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 12:32:34 -0800, "AKA gray asphalt"
wrote:

No problem ...

You may find this to be a very laborious task. Wood of proper thickness is available?

This should be practical after you get the hang of the device. You'd need an outfeed guide of some sort.

Hey, everbody has to start somewhere. Lucky ones had a dad or uncle to show 'em how.
There are 'leventy-seven zillion "project plans" that use a TS. After you've ripped and crosscut some test stuff, you might wanna shop for a nice, simple plan ...

Priority Uno.
Good Luck, Puddin'
"Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim." - Bertrand Russell
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