Hurricane-proof House

Page 3 of 11  
Notan wrote:

Possibly, hence the use of reinforced concrete and the steel shutters.
Matt
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Yes, and if subjected to heavy wave action it would probably fail. Cat 3 Katrina tore up a lot of heavy duty structures. But even before those considerations it would cost way too much and would not pass residential codes because it would be an eyesore. A realistic house would have to be one at ground level that could survive immersion. I think that means a heavy stone/cement igloo shaped structure.
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On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 22:10:29 GMT, "Jim-Poncin"

iisn't new orleans on a sand bar? make it too heavy and it will just sink when the ground gets saturated. a bunch of buildings did that on sand fill in san francisco during one of the big earthquakes.
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No, it lies on delta muds and silts that slowly de-water, compact and subside. There are many tall masonry buildings in downtown N.O. that are on the same foundation.
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"Jim-Poncin"> wrote

Nope. I've done over 300 hpmes in the 130mph wind zone during the past 15 years and all of them sustained the 4 terrors last year. No ONE thing will do it, it takes a *system*. Clue: Abiding by FEMA dictates will get people killed.
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Sure, but that can be overcome with engineering and $$$$. maybe lots of $$$$$$$$$$.
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On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 20:54:44 GMT

This sounds possible though, not out of the question.
-
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Saab Guy wrote:

It is absolutely possible, but I'm not sure it is economically feasible. I guess if you REALLY want to live in a below sea level area, it might be worth it to you.
Matt
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Don't build it in New Orleans.
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You had a shot up until the "unwanted government interference". There is nothing that can be built to stand up or resist that.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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"Mark & Juanita"> wrote

So true. <wry grin>
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On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 21:26:21 -0700, Mark & Juanita

More to the point, you wouldn't be able to break ground on the house's foundation without having to deal with it.
Lee
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>

Underground?
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CWatters wrote:

That thought, too, crossed my mind.
Underground would prevent *all* wind damage, but the house would have to be 110% waterproof/watertight, and have some type of above-ground ventilation system.
Notan
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House built into the side of a mountain that is above sea level. ~ preferably in a lesser earthquake zone.
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wrote in message

Versus the mountains that are below sea-level????????????????????
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Chris wrote:

While the wording *is* a bit ambiguous, I think he probably meant, not at the bottom of a mountain, whose base is at sea level. <g>
Notan
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wrote:

Too dangerous... subs run into them...
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Looks like all of the major concrete buildings in downtown N.O. "survived" Katrina noting the obvious problems with windows being blown out and the roof of the Superdome falling apart.
The dumb decicions would be the placement of critical facilities at the ground (flooding level), for locating emergency generators, electrical rooms, HVAC, etc. It would seem that if these were located at higher floors to begin with, coupled with larger emergency water tanks and fuel supplies, and perhaps a 2 week pre-placed food supply, that these buildings would make nice shelters against future hurricanes (even cat. 5).
Elsewhere in the city, critical cellular and municipal communications towers should have been hardened for maximum strength and have all generators and ground facilities elevated above the flooding level.
Beachcomber
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wrote:

Here's a turn-key design, courtesy of Uncle Sam: https://www.cheyennemountain.af.mil/thedesign.htm
Lee
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