Hunter Ceiling Fan no lnger works

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My Hunter ceiling fan (model #25560) and its lights no longer work when I pull the pull-chains.
The fan/lights are NOT controlled by a wall switch nor by a remote-control.
The wiring between the fan and the electrical panel is OK and all of the circuit breakers are On.
Does the fan have a reset button? If so, where is it?
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On 1/13/2013 1:10 PM, gary wrote:

the fan's junction box. This is where the light fixture attaches. This is the only other location where there are splices. Since the fan and light have separate wires for the hot legs, it is likely that the neutral splice has come loose in this junction box
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gary wrote:

The fact that neither lights nor fan work suggests/indicates that there is no juice to either, as opposed to the fan motor not working or a pull switch malfunction or a fan reversal switch being in neutral.
The juice to the two, fan and lights, is common, whereas the mechanism for turning them on and off and reversing is separate.

I would access what is likely the wire nuts for the electrical connection to the fan and lights after you have double-checked that you haven't made an error in evaluating whether the circuit breaker for the fan/light is properly identified.
It isn't 'logical' electrically speaking that there isn't a wall switch somewhere for a ceiling fixture. Most likely when the electrical circuit was installed, there wasn't a ceiling fan/light there (yet). I have 4 ceiling fans in my house and they all have wall switches (in addition to whatever other controls they have).
One of those wall switches of mine is used so seldom I can hardly remember where it is. More than once I have thought something was wrong with my remote for the ceiling fan/light because the remote 'wasn't working' to turn it on.
--
Mike Easter

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I'm not so sure about that. Imagine this scenario:
The upstairs bedrooms in my house had no ceiling fixtures when I moved in. A wall switch controlled an outlet in each room. I added ceiling light fixtures and rerouted the wires to the switch to control them, but...
Had I been installing fans/lights with remote controls, I don't know that I would have gone through the trouble of wiring in the switches. It wasn't easy getting the wire through the top plates of the walls, down to the switches, etc. I can certainly see a reason to wire the lights to the switch and operate the fan only via remote, but I can also see - depending on hard it would be to wire in the switches - to simply run power wires to the fan, leave the rest of the wiring as it was and use the remote to control the fan and light.
So, "logically" it's very possible that there is no switch.

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On 01/13/2013 03:11 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

All the above notwithstanding, the first thing that I'd do is drop the light kit and start troubleshooting inside there. both the fan and light switches are housed above the light but below the motor. If that doesn't reveal anything, time to drop the fan and see what's up inside the ceiling box. It's not that hard really, hint: I would remove the blades first to make it easier to handle the motor. Also take a piece of wire up the ladder with you to hang the motor while disconnecting - most Hunter fans provide a mechanism to hang the motor from the bracket during installation, but if you don't know what it is, it would be nice to not be trying to figure it out on a ladder.
I suppose it's possible that both pull switches failed simultaneously, but I would think it is more likely that there's a bad connection somewhere, my guess would be in the ceiling box. (I'm ASSuming for the sake of argument that all info given is correct, e.g. that it's not a breaker.)
nate
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It's not too unusual in older homes, say those first wired early 20th century, to have some ceiling fixtures with lamps controlled only by pull chains. Perhaps the OP's ceiling fan is connected to one of those.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On 01/13/2013 06:33 PM, Larry W wrote:

And even after the introduction of wall switches the mindset of electricians laying out the wiring in a new house remained old-school for quite some time after that - the main distribution run of power on the floors of a house was from ceiling box to ceiling box. Switching was accomplished by "switch legs." Often wall receps would also branch out of the ceiling boxes, or the electrician would run the switch leg in 14/3 and then run a 14/2 from the switch box to a recep below.
I'm not sure when the shift away from that style of wiring occurred - I know it was later than the 50's and probably before the 80's, but I've never lived in/worked on anywhere built in between those decades.
In some ways the old school wiring methods make the wiring easier to bring up to modern standards without busting up too much plaster, especially if one's attic is unfinished... (ask me how I know this.)
nate
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Larry W wrote:

If we accept the original premise, that there is (allegedly) no wall switch and there is (definitely) no problem at the circuit breaker and two separate electrical devices each with independent switch (fan/light) which both worked previously but now simultaneously no longer now work, then we are left to assume that -1- such as some creature chewed/divided the electrical wire in the ceiling -2- a wire nut or similar manual connection magically unscrewed/released itself -OR- -3- (like at my house) a 'never used'/ lost and forgotten/ occult/ wall switch got turned off.
To me, the allegedly non-existent vs lost and forgotten/ secret unknown/ switch seems more likely than either of the other two, but then that's just me and my own experience with secret wall switches, I guess.
--
Mike Easter

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On 1/13/2013 6:50 PM, Mike Easter wrote:

The wiring between the fan and the electrical panel is OK and all of the circuit breakers are On" I would believe that this means he has , or believes he has 120 volts at the splices in the fan canopy. If in fact, he does, any wall switch is a moot point.
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RBM wrote:

He didn't 'say' (specifically) he had voltage at the canopy.
He seems to be focused on a concept of repeatedly asking about a 'reset switch' -- which is silly when it comes to talking about a light bulb not working and which fan reset is neither addressed or illustrated in the .pdf manual (with troubleshooting section) link he was provided earlier. None of my fans, Hunter, Hampton Bay, Casablanca, totalling 5 including a reinstall of one of them, have had any reset switch.
To me, it isn't logical that there would be a user reset switch to be reset manually living inside a canopy housing up in a ceiling.
Instead he provided only his troubleshooting conclusions without giving sufficient information about how he derived the conclusions. He said
"The wiring between the fan and the electrical panel is OK and all of the circuit breakers are On."
I have no idea how he concluded the integrity of the wiring between the fan and the panel or how he concluded the breaker was 'on'. He also said 'No longer work' indicating that previously both worked.
All of that causes me to be uncertain as to how he went about determining the information we were provided which causes me to 'suspect' that some part of the information was incomplete or inaccurate.
I focused on the 'secret' wall switch because of my own wall switches which were installed at the same time as the ceiling box. I did not assume that he had tested the voltage in the canopy and I also have no idea how much he knows about breaker behaviors and positions.
The last time I chased down a mystery impossible downstairs outside dead outlet plug I eventually discovered that it was supposed to be getting its juice from a circuit far away and in an upstairs bathroom outlet with a GFI breaker
--
Mike Easter

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+1
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Didn't we do this about a week ago?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 20:07:09 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I think it was on February second.
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 20:07:09 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

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Hi Mike,
My ceiling fan is wired directly to the electric panel. There is no wall switch. There is no remote control.
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gary wrote:

I would still access the connection at the ceiling if it isn't at the panel or the apparently non-existent wall switch.
http://www.hunterfan.com/Support/Manuals-and-Parts-Guides /      Model: 25551 25564 25566 25560 25561 25563 Owner's Manual http://www.hunterfan.com/uploadedFiles/Support/Owner_Manuals/40955.pdf
--
Mike Easter

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The OP didn't say he/she threw the breaker and then reset it.. All he said was that the breakers are ON. Maybe he doesn't realize that the breakers can trip and the indicator/switch lever does not always go to OFF. He needs to throw all the breakers OFF and then back ON to be sure. Also he/she didn't say if they had access to a voltmeter (only $2.99 with coupon in today's newspaper from Harbor Freight).
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gary wrote:

If you have juice to the fan, replace the switches. They *do* wear out.
You can check by bypassing them...if stuff then works the switches are bad.
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dadiOH
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Back to my original question:
Does my Hunter ceiling fan have a reset button or a reset switch?
Or might it have a fuse that may have blown?
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On 01/13/2013 07:04 PM, gary wrote:

I doubt it. The motor might have a thermal fuse but I am aware of no such fuse for the light. I'd still be looking for a loose splice.
nate
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