How to turn off fire sprinkler?

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On 6/25/2011 2:46 PM, bob wrote:

I'd get he hell out of there, it's a flood hazard.
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Sprinkler heads go off one at a time. It's not like the movies where a fire by one head makes the whole room rain. Only the heads that get hot enough will start spraying. If that happens you'll be glad they did.
They don't trip accidentaly. BUT! They are pretty delicate when it comes to being bumped, and they dump an impressive amount of water when they go off. So you do want to be VERY careful when near them. I've seen people hang a clothes hanger on them with disastrous results, or your kids could toss a frisbee, etc. You'll be liable for the damage if you cause it.
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Yes, you could certainly install a water sensing device that would kill the power to the machines, but you might want to place it as close to the spinkler head as possible.
If you placed it on the floor (where most water sensing alarms are usually placed) your systems would probably already be wet by the time the sensor sensed the water.
You could also place your equipment in racks with a "roof" to keep the water off of the equipment, but you'd have to deal with ventilation so that the roof didn't keep the heat in. That could, ironically, cause a fire! ;-)
Of course, once the fire department crashes through the window with hoses a-blazing and waters down your whole apartment, all bets are off as far as keeping your equipment dry.
All that said, if you are that concerned about your equipment, I'll assume that you already employ off site back-up storage for your data. You can try and protect the systems from water, but if the fire itself wipes out the back-up media stored in the shoe box in the hall closet, you're just as out of luck.
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No. You cannot control the sprinklers. They are controlled at a central location in the apartment building, on a floor-by-floor basis, or a building-by-building basis, depending on the size of the building.
You don't want some idiot turning off his sprinklers out of some misguided notion that his electronic toys are worth more than human lives.

That's the risk you run. Make sure you have renter's insurance that covers all your stuff. Keep important papers in a water-tight fire safe. Keep backups of your important data off site.

There are some devices designed to protect against basement flooding. However, they may not work if it's just "raining." Also, even if your computer is off, if it gets wet, you can forget about ever using it again.
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On Jun 28, 10:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote: Also, even if your

In my experience (admittedly not with any recent computers) that isn't necessarily true.
If it is powered up when it gets wet, damage can occur as jolts flow where they shouldn't. But if not powered up, you can usually dry them out and they work fine.
We used to take keyboards apart and flush them with distilled water, back in the days when they were expensive.
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snip

Yes the switch you are asking about is called a shunt trip. It's name comes from the shunting of some of a breakers current to a solenoid inside the breaker that trips the breaker to the tripped position even though the current flow has not exceeded the breaker's rating. The shunt switch can take many forms including a manually operated push button. Automatic shunt trips are now required in elevator machine rooms and shafts in order to avoid any erratic operation that might be caused by sprinkler discharge effecting the elevator controls. That is needed because indoor elevator controls are not built to be waterproof. These use a heat detector to shunt the current to the solenoid and trip the breaker. The heat detector used has a lower actuation temperature than the sprinkler heads used in those spaces.
That said I believe you would find the cost of parts and installation a large price to pay for a scenario that is not likely. Keep in mind that smoke can do as much damage to delicate electronics as water so suppressing the fire quickly; which is an automatic sprinkler systems reason for existence; will do much to raise the chance of successful salvage of the electronics you are trying to protect. -- Tom Horne
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On 6/30/2011 10:26 AM, Tom Horne wrote:

I've installed a lot of shunt trip breakers and contactors that power commercial kitchen equipment located under exhaust hoods equipped with dry chemical fire suppression systems. Most folks don't know to leave the hood fan running because the whole building will get covered with white powder. :-)
TDD
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replying to bob, Taylor wrote:

They have tools out there to stop the water from flowing. Check out www.quickstoptool.com. By the time the fire department gets there, locates your main water shut off valve and the system drains, you will have plenty of damage inside that could be avoided if you have a shut off tool on hand. Since most sprinklers are serviced, a malfunction is unlikely, its vandalism (whether intentional or not) that a lot of times causes unnecessary damage. As I say all of this, the benefits to having sprinklers outweighs the risk of potential damage. But for peace of mind, there are tools out there that anyone can use. And if I was living on the bottom floor, I would buy my neighbor one who lives above me incase their sprinkler head gets damaged.
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You might check in with the local fire inspectors. It has been about 30 years since I dealt with residential sprinklers (and even then only peripherally) but it sticks in my mind that the first responders just used a wooden shim like you use to level windows. I could be VERY wrong, though.
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On 8/20/2013 10:39 AM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

yes, quite possibly. You'd have to look at the sprinkler heads and determine how to stop the water from flowing once the element pops however. Some of them use a glass element that breaks, others use a metal fuse link.
If this is a multi-story building, there ought to be a valve in one of the stairwells feeding the entire floor, at which the water can be shut off. However, touching that valve in an other than official capacity can cause lots of (legal) problems. I would be very very hesitant to touch that valve under any but an emergency circumstance (e.g. someone knocked a head loose, you knew 100% that there was no fire, and you were on the phone with 911 or the fire dept. and they asserted that it was OK to shut that valve.) Additionally, it might be a looped system where you have to shut two valves in two different stairwells to isolate a floor.
nate
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Doubt you can turn it off. If the sprinkler does go off, you have more problems than losing a computer.
In most cases, the valves are locked in the open position. This is to avoid people turning them off and rendering the sprinkler system useless when needed. You can even be arrested in some jurisdictions.
The fire department or the building maintenance can turn them off.
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On 8/20/2013 11:15 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's the old school way. Today newer buildings tend to have valve position monitor switches tied into the fire alarm system that will alert the building personnel if a valve is tampered with (in fact the common term for them is "tamper switches.")
My understanding was that there should be a "breakaway" somewhere in the chain or cable that would allow someone to shut the valve in an emergency by applying greater than normal (but not outside the range of normal human strength) to the handwheel. However I've seen plenty of valves locked open with what appeared to be ordinary chain.

Agree 100% with the above.
nate
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Taylor wrote:

Why OP worry about that? That is FD business unless he is worrying about accidental trigger of the sprinkler. Think Murphy's law. If accidents hppens, that is when you are not home....,LOL!
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replying to Tony Hwang , Taylor wrote:

Actually, you speak with firefighters (many of my friends are firefighters) and many of these activations happen when people are home (kids throwing balls in the house, remodeling being done, burning food on the stove and the fire gets put out but water is still flowing, etc). Plus, some fire departments don't have these tools yet and resort to using wood chalks if the head is still intact. But if its been completely damaged and they don't have the proper tool, they're going to let that system drain. You can check with your local fire dept to make sure they have the tools necessary, or you can have your own back up plan. Just depends on how valuable your property is. And yeah, renters/homeowners insurance will replace items, but you have your deductible and there could be items you can't get back. Having a fire sprinkler shut down tool is like having a fire extinguisher in your home.. Just food for thought.
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Taylor wrote:

Hi, Even if you have the tool there is no guarantee you can use it in time for restricted access to the valve. I never lived in a rented place.
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Most moments when the sprinkler is going off, the FD has control of the scene, and no one is allowed in. So, the device may sit in a drawer, until it's all over.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/20/2013 3:48 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

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On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 15:18:31 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Most. May, may not. I'm as cheap as anyone here but if I had sprinklers, I'd spend the 85 dollars for the one posted, unless for some reason it wasn't going to work at all.
Actually, I've had more water problems than probably any of you. Just about everything that can go wrong has, And for the most part, the only things that got damaged were the cardboard boxes things are stored in on the basement floor. (I have two wood tool boxes on the floor but they sit on sections of fence picket. They've never gotten wet.) I used to try to replace the boxes but they were each of a different size, and some had thick walls and very hard to find. So now I just let the boxes sit there until they dry out. They stick to the cement floor a little, but not much. If any rust forms on what is inside, I'll use a grinder with a wire wheel later.
Another time, I had a whole set of DC and suburban phone books and yellow pages, that a friend in DC collected for me. They got wet and no good, and a few even got moldy, so I threw them all away but one.
If I had sprinklers first I'd hide my photo albums from them The electonic pictures I have muliple copies of, and probably woudl't be damaged anyhow.

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wrote:

Most of the things I want I couldn't get back. They're my and my family's personal history and they don't sell that anywhere.

Nothing comes with a guarantee (except death and taxes). I would certainly want one of those if I had sprinklers.

Rented or owned, you've never had sprinklers, right?
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micky wrote:

Our FD is less than 5 mins. away from where we live. Just up the hill. (may be 2 blocks?_ When I run to use the tool, fire engines will be here.
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wrote:

Oh, I thought you were advising *other* people not to buy one.
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