How to turn off fire sprinkler?

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I live in an apartment with several fire sprinkler in the ceiling.
If the sprinkler goes off due to fire or malfunction, can I turn it off after the fire is out? Is it the same valve near the water heater or is there a different one?
I’m more worry about water damage (to electronics and computers) than fire damage. Perhaps because I’ve never had a fire before and this is the first time I moved to a place with fire sprinklers.
Alternately, is there a switch to cut off power to computers or other devices when it senses water? This would reduce short-circuits caused by water when the device is powered.
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@Bob:
The fire sprinkler system in your apartment is being inspected on an annual basis by the local AHJ... So a "malfunction" is not very likely to occur... You do realize that each individual sprinkler head must "activate" by having a bi-metal piece or glycerin syringe melt/pop in order for water to flow from it... It is not a "deluge" type system unless it is very very very old or deployed in special situation like a theatre stage...
As to turning off the sprinkler system after a fire, the fire department will take care of that before they turn the building back over to the owner during the overhaul...
Well, your new home is much safer than your previous domiciles as you will not be burnt to death in a fire and have a much longer escape window during a fire event in a sprinklered building than in one without...
As to your question about water damage to electronics, that is what happens when things get soaking wet -- this is many more times likely to happen from a water leak from a tenant on a floor above you than from sprinkler leaks or an actual fire... As someone else stated, get renter's insurance... There is already a device which will shut off power when water logged devices short circuit, it is called a circuit breaker... However I wouldn't worry that much about it, as during a serious fire event in a building the fire department generally shuts off the power to the building to make the fire fighting operations safer and remove electrical short circuiting as a source of ignition...
~~ Evan
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On 6/25/2011 4:38 PM, Evan wrote:

And, believe it or not. most consumer electronics/PCs (with the possible exception of of LCD displays), handle getting wet pretty well, as long as it is not immersed and the water is clean. I've salvaged plenty of stuff that was left outside, or under an accidental sprinkler discharge. Unplug, hold upside down to drain, field-strip it, blow it out gently with an air source, and leave in a sunny window for a day or three. May have to use a little electronic spray cleaner on any pots or circuit boards that show water trails, and replace a popped fuse here and there, but it usually still works.
The odds go down with a sewage leak, or plumbing supply line leak that came down through drywall and insulation, of course. But my old-school Sherwood stereo receiver in the other room came out of a dumpster, where previous owner thought it was ruined because a cat pissed in it. Cleaning and new fuses, and it lit right up and sounds fine.
--
aem sends...


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wrote:

I think it would help if you explained what field-strip means here.

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On 6/25/2011 6:39 PM, mm wrote:

In this context, it means take it apart as far as you can, and still be able to put it back together. Take the case off or apart, take out any boards that are held in place with screws and unpluggable connectors, pull the knobs off- basically anything that wouldn't take a Real Electronics Expert (which I am not) to put back together. Use eyes and a real bright flashlight, and maybe a cheap VOM, to look for any simple mechanical damage, or contaminant trails that can easily be cleaned out. Use VOM or flashlight to check fuses, and any solder joints that may have cracked that can be repaired without specialized tools.
-- aem sends...
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On Sat, 25 Jun 2011 20:32:11 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Probably not. Except for a couple parts near where the cord comes in, the voltage inside a receiver is about 12DC or lower. Even the 110v parts are well insulated except for a few solder spots.

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wrote:

[snip]
Pee is electrically conductive enough to could hurt on 12V.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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On 6/26/2011 2:12 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

But it ain't a continuous conductive stream, at least according to Mythbusters. At least for humans, standing up. Not sure about a cat, being lower to the ground and all.
--
aem sends...

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On 06/25/2011 05:25 PM, aemeijers wrote:

Water is clean? you ever smelled water that has been sitting in sprinkler pipes for a long time? That water is anything *but* clean. Certainly not "potable" even.
But like I said in my previous post, it's not something that the OP should be losing sleep over; odds are far higher of having a domestic water leak than an unneeded sprinkler activation incident.
nate
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[snip]

I once got a good clock-radio out of a dumpster. It just needed to be cleaned out because it was full of roach shit.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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@Oren:
It is not that the water is dirty, as it is the same water that you could drink in most places... It is that during the many years of sitting in the black pipe the manganese and other dissolved solids settle out of solution...
~~ Evan
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It also will tu rn stagnant, stsink like a sewer and turn black. We discovered that the day I had a fire in the jail and spinklers activated. One real mess to clean up. I suppose what happens to it depends on the local water supply but turn stagnant it will.
Harry K
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@Harry K:
Definitely sounds to me like some sort of neglect on the part of the jail has gone on here... Your sprinkler system should be having at least annual flow tests -- where inspector test valves in each zone are opened to determine the responsiveness of the water flow sensors for each zone (which can go bad) as well as each supervised zone valve being exercised from fully opened to fully closed and back to open to test the tamper switches...
If your water in your sprinkler system expires and smells like sewage after only 12 months then there are local water quality issues at play -- if your sprinkler system is being fed from a potable water supply... Some regions of the country maintain a separate system for fire hydrants and sprinkler mains which is NOT potable and your system might be connected to such a water supply...
Generally even good treated water in a sprinkler main will have the manganese dioxide (fine gritty black powder) precipitate out of solution from sitting a year in the pipe... It is better to rinse any of the powder down the nearest drain with clean water than to wait and try to sweep it up once it is dry...
~~ Evan
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@Oren:
ROFL... ROFL... ROFL...
Really man... I know of accreditation and the concepts of what sort of elements/conditions/procedures/training that are required to be adhered to in order to attain them... Such accreditations are entirely voluntary (meaning they are NOT required by any law) and cost a lot of money to maintain...
Perhaps the jails and prisons in your area are able to fund themselves to become accredited -- but given the general condition of overcrowding in prisons and the budget cuts in rehabilitation programs the actual number of accredited prisons and jails is going to be very low...
There is a similar organization called CALEA that accredits law enforcement agencies... The number of police departments accredited by CALEA is shockingly small, but maintaining an accreditation costs a lot of money and requires that the criteria be followed at all times...
Examples:
State of Massachusetts -
There are 400-ish local/college police departments... Only 4 agencies have been awarded accreditations... The Massachusetts State Police is NOT accredited... 3 additional agencies are in the process to become accredited...
State of Rhode Island -
There are 50-ish local/college police departments... Only 6 agencies have been awarded accreditations... The Rhode Island State Police IS accredited... 2 additional agencies are in the process to become accredited...
You can look up CALEA certified agencies in your local area on their website... But the number of accredited agencies is still a very very small percentage...
A "safety audit" at a prison is much much less than an accreditation and usually refers to ensuring the security devices in place are operating properly and that staff safety is as high as it can be and that prisoner safety is also good...
Internal "Safety Managers" (most prisons call this position the "Director of Security" or Safety, etc.) document conditions and make budgetary recommendations... What monies are actually realized in the budget based on the requests/recommendations is nowhere near was requested and not in the same ballpark of what would be required to achieve and maintain an accreditation...
So examples can be used and twisted -- yet it seems from what HarryK stated in his replies here that some lack of proper care and attention went on with the sprinkler system in the specific correctional facility he was describing...
~~ Evan
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On Jun 26, 8:00am, "Stormin Mormon"

The inspectors test on a sprinkler system only flows the same water as a single sprinkler. It is used to test the Alarm Check Valve, water motor gong, and the water flow switches that activate the buildings alarm system. It is not an effective way to flush the system. Many residential sprinkler systems do not use black iron piping and do not contaminate the water used in them. Copper tubing and plastic piping are both used in residential sprinkler systems because the piping installed in such occupancies is not as subject to physical damage as the piping that is installed in warehouses, factories, and other industrial buildings. -- Tom Horne
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On Saturday, June 25, 2011 1:42:51 PM UTC-7, Evan wrote:

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I doubt very much if “renters insurance” is going to pay-up if someone places a Christmas tree on top of their vehicle which hits the fire sprinkl er in the garage which destroys everything they have stored in their garage . Those are the perils of living in an apartment. This happened to someone I know. You would have to put me in a coma to have me live in an apartment.
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On Tue, 20 Aug 2013 17:31:01 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

He put the tree on his car's roof, and the sprinkler damaged his stuff?
Or someone else S put a tree on S's car roof and the water damaged your friend's stuff? They shared a garage but he still had space for a lot of stuff?
Was the garage excluded from coverage?
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On 6/25/2011 1:46 PM, bob wrote:

It's not like in the movies and TV where you see all the sprinkler heads start spraying water at the same time. It doesn't work like that if that worries you. Only the sprinkler head tripped by flames releases water. Many systems are dry, meaning there is no water, only compressed air in the pipes which keeps the main water valve shut until a sprinkler head is activated by fire. The wet pipe systems have to be drained to flush them out on a regular basis to keep crud out of them, the dry systems don't have that problem and the maintenance folks have to keep an eye on the air pressure in the system which is usually remotely monitored through the alarm system. If you are in a multi-floor apartment building , each floor may have a maintenance closet where there is a valve for your floor.
TDD
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On 06/25/2011 06:58 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Dry systems are typically only used where ther eis a risk of freezing. The vast majority of residential sprinklers are wet pipe.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Dry systems are a bitch to maintain and they tend to rust faster than a wet system due to the oxygen and moisture contained in the pipes. I used to keep an eye on a system that had two risers and compressors. I can't tell you how many times I had to scramble to trouble shot a compressor before it tripped and charged the system. Rust, pin holes, bad connections... dry systems tend to develop small leaks and the compressors have to work harder and harder to keep up as the system gets older. If the diaphragm trips unintentionally due to a drop in pressure there is always a chance some of the heads may fail due to the hammer effect.
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