how to connect a generator

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My house has no electricity in the storm. How do I use a generator? I put gas in there , and start it up. It should generate electricity. Do I pluck it into any socket into the house?
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should be some outlets on the generator. plug lamp etc into them.

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Get a transfer panel and read yer manual first before you pfluck everything up.
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My house has no electricity in the storm. How do I use agenerator? I put gas in there , and start it up. It shuld generate electricity. Do I pluck it into any socket into the house?
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That's a no-no. If a maintenance person works on the high-voltage line, it will be live when it is expected that it is dead.
You need a transfer switch that ensures that your house circuits (more likely a subset of them) are connected EITHER to the incoming utility supply OR to the generator and that there is no connection between the generator and the utility supply.
Perce
On 02/27/06 10:19 pm snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 22:51:43 -0500, "Percival P. Cassidy"

Not if you also disconnect the main line from the utility pole.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Plug an outlet strip into the generator. Run orange extention cords to the fridge, a couple of lamps, and a TV. Once or twice a day, unplug the fridge and plug in the deep freezer for a hour.
Bob
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wrote:

Don't feed the trolls!
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you have no electricity how are you sending the message?
If your question is for real and not a toll, you need to learn a lot about how to chose and use that generator. You need to know what its capabilities are and what you load requirements are. You need to learn about transfer switches and most of all you need to know that you never run it inside your home.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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On 2/27/06 10:19 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@j33g2000cwa.googlegroups.com,

Rule #1: Generator outside Rule #2: Good extension cord and power strip
Run suitably sized cord (12 guage is best) from generator to power strip, then run cords from the strip to your equipment..
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!!!!!!!!!!NEVER DO THIS!!!!!!!!!!
I always find it interesting that so much is said about backfeeding the utility company creating a hazard to linemen.
I do admit it might happen, but consider the average load on a line with even a dozen homes. the load would be so great it would stall the generator, or trip the generators breaker.
theres no way a 5 or 10K generator is going to power even a small neighborhood espically with the high starting current load of motors.
Like I said DO EVER DO THIS but would appreciate others opinions on the subject
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Obviously I meant NEVER DO THIS!!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You don't know where the break is in the distribution line. Your generator could be backfeeding a transformer with no load on it because that's where the break is.
It's a remote possibility, and even so it should only affect a stupid or momentarily careless lineman -- but I don't feel that I have a right to take chances with his life because I want to do a half-assed installation. (I also don't want to burn up my generator in the more likely scenario that the backfed line looks like a dead short)
Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

But isn't that one of the hazards of being a lineman?
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Yes, it is. So is pole climbing and crossing the street.
Regardless, there is NO excuse for using a generator improperly.
As someone else said: With the genset running outdoors, run a heavy extension cord into the dwelling and branch-off other cords to vital equipment.
Unless a PROPERLY installed transfer switch is used, leave the house wiring ALONE!
Common line safety practices include insulating gauntlets, commoning all conductors and bonding them to ground.
Anyone that backfeeds to the grid during an outage DESERVES to have their genset FRIED!
JR 26-yr lineman
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

"FACE: 90PR05
SUBJECT: Lineman Dies When He Contacts Energized Power Line in Puerto Rico CAUSE: Electrocution
SUMMARY: On September 29, 1989, a 42-year-old male lineman with 19 years of experience was electrocuted while attaching a 2,400-volt power line to a pole-mounted insulator. The power line had been de-energized two days earlier and the supervisor assured the lineman that the power line was still de-energized.
A construction crew consisting of a supervisor, three class A linemen (including the victim), a first-class lineman, a groundman, and two truck drivers were assigned the task of correcting a malfunction in a de-energized three-phase power line. When the crew arrived at the work site, they found that one of the three phases had broken and fallen to the ground. The supervisor instructed the victim to relocate the damaged phase on the cross-arm of the pole to better balance the load on the cross-arm. As the victim began to climb the pole he was assured by the supervisor that the power lines had been de-energized. When he attempted to relocate the damaged line he contacted another phase, was shocked, and slumped backwards, prevented from falling by his safety belt. The power lines at the work site had been energized by backfeed electrical energy from a portable gas generator being used on the circuit. "
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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Very sad someone died, BUT linemen are always SUPPOSED to assume all lines are hot, since a energized line might drop across a denergized line at any time.,
locally when a big outage occurs duquesne light installs intentional shorts across lines to prevent accidents. ' I found out about this when a friend had a firecall, for traffic control. someone threw the wrong switch and the short exploded pushing a lineman off a tower
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And homeowners are supposed to get a permit before performing electrical work. During storm recovery outside wiremen work twelve hour shifts. They're human and they make mistakes. So cut them some slack and don't try to jury rig back fed supply to any buildings wiring. Install listed load transfer equipment or use extension cords directly from the generators receptacles to supply the loads. -- Tom of the sparks and arcs
"This alternating current thing is just a fad. It is much too dangerous for general use." Thomas Alva Edison
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Tom Horne, Electrician wrote:

I don't know how practical it would be with 2400V, but for home work I use a voltmeter to make sure my line is dead, and as a final check I short the line briefly. No sparks, line's dead.
The short might sound stupid, but (1) I know when my voltmeter is lying, and (2) a live body can call the fire department, a dead one can't call an ambulance.
--
All relevant people are pertinent.
All rude people are impertinent.
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I too intentially short all lines in my home before working on them! Every now and then I get a big surprise:(
found a bad breaker that way, the wire melted and the breaker never tripped
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