How to connect 2nd Ground Rod

Hi. What's the typical way to connect two ground rods to a meter panel ? I borrowed a commercial ground meter, and measured 50 ohms at my meter panel. If the resistance measures above 25 ohms, the NEC recommends driving a second ground rod, at least six feet from the first one. When connecting the ground rods to meter panel, is it better to connect them in series, or run a wire from the meter panel to each rod ?
Thanx.
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Don S. wrote:

I don't think it makes any difference.
I'd probably clamp another #6 wire onto the grounding electrode conductor with a big ol' copper split bolt wherever it was convenient and not subject to having people mess with it (like maybe underground, right next to the 1st electrode.) If for some reason I wanted to make the tap irreversible, I would silver-solder the threads and the bottom side of the nut on that split-bolt after it was good and tight.
Whatever you do, don't cut the first grounding electrode conductor.
Bob
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I go with a single wire, unbroken, from the panel and through the first clamp then on over to the second one.
Not sure how code views this but it always has passed inspections.
--

SVL



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PrecisionMachinisT wrote:

I assumed the first wire was already installed and cut to length, and he didn't want to replace it.
-Bob
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That's how I've always seen it and the way code is in this county...single wire.

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The wire has to be unbroken to the *first* electrode:
The grounding electrode conductor between the service equipment and any convenient part of the grounding electrode system (to the first electrode) must be installed in one continuous length without a splice unless spliced by means of listed irreversible compression connectors or exothermic welding, 250-64 (c). It must always be suitably protected against corrosion, 250-62.
Unbroken to both electrodes is a good idea, but the NEC doesn't require it. (I believe some localities might, however.)
Best regards, Bob
Curmudgeon wrote:

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I was just relating as to how I always done it on new services.....
If I am gonna mess around updating old ground wires, rods, etc., generally I will replace them all--conductors, clamps, the whole nine yards....but to each his own I spose, so long as the connections are all sound.
--

SVL




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If the old ground rod is not doing the job, disconect it! Remove it if you want, but don't use it.
Put in a new ground rod 2 or 3 feet away. Most codes will not allow more than one ground rod - and for good reason.
You asked if you connected the new ground rod in series or parallel. Pray tell, how would you connect them in series? Think about it.
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Bob wrote:

You don't know what you are talking about.
-Bob (no relation)
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Ahem.
The NEC not only doesn't disallow more than one ground rod, in many cases it _requires_ more than one.
Ditto CEC.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Is there any other way to do this other than with a commercial ground meter? Is it possible to rent one of these?
--
Bob in CT
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We used to have a lot of trouble getting good grounds in the desert for missile launchers. Problem was solved by placing the enlisted latrine over the ground rods.
RB
Don S. wrote:

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Why the enlisted ones?? Is it because the brasses' stuff don't stink?? (ha-ha)
I've also read that rock salt buried around the rod will help with getting a good ground. You might want to contact the ARRL (American Radio Relay League) at www.arrl.org. They might have some good information.
Good luck.
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Rileyesi wrote:

Hi, Charcoal chunks spread around works well too. Salt will corrode the rod I guess. Tony
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