How much does it cost to change 15amp circuit to 20 amp

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No, you can't. People do all kinds of stupid things all the time. "Reasonably sure" would come from seeing 12ga at *every* access point on the circuit, and even then, that doesn't equate to "certain." When I remodeled my kitchen two years ago, I removed a floor-to-ceiling cabinet to find a section of plaster removed, and two junction boxes inside the wall. People do all kinds of stupid things all the time.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Can the treadmill run on 240v? It would be relatively cheap to change the circuit to a 240v/15a; though obviously you would have to change/disconnect all the other outlets on the circuit.
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Toller wrote:

sorry you would need 4 conductors, 3 wire 240 isnt permitted
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False.
3-wire 240V is just fine for any purely 240V load (e.g. resistance heating, or a 240V motor). 4-wire is required *only* for devices that have both 240V and 120V loads, such as a clothes dryer or an electric range, both of which have 240V heating elements and 120V control and timer circuits.
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I doubt the machine could be wired 240 volt, but why would it require four wire. It's not a cooking equipment

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RBM (remove this) wrote:

I have a 4 wire compressor. 2 hots, 1 neutral and a ground.
I think more and more 240 volt appliances are going 4 wire.
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"sorry you would need 4 conductors, 3 wire 240 isn't permitted" It is permitted where applicable. Some equipment require neutrals and some don't

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So what? Doesn't mean that 3-wire is not permitted, as you incorrectly claimed. 3-wire 240V is permitted where 4-wire is not required.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Probably not, there are likely to be some displays or something else that require 120v, but to save $900 it is worth looking into. If the damn thing actually requires a 20a circuit, it should be convertable.
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Toller wrote:

well if theres nothing else on that circuit it could be converted to 240 at the breaker end then install a transformer to take the 240 back to 120.....
but in all honesty it might be cheaper to buy a brand new treadmill that runs on 15 amp......
new treadmill with all the latest best features including safety ones......
does the treadmill have a 20 amp plug on it?
any other close by 20 amp circuits around? whats on the other side of that garage wall?
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I suggest somone plug this in, does it have a special 20 amp plug with the extra bar prong piece or whatever its called on it?
then check its actual current draw with a clamp on amp meter.
high current may only be at 30 MPH or something else unlikely in actual operation.
heck the 20 amp rating might be a massaged number by the manufacturer to make their unit worth its high price.
the 20 amps MIGHT be the current draw of the motor at 36 volts whereas the unit might peak at 12 amps at 120 volts.
measured current goes up as voltage goes down which is why cross country power lines are at thousands of volts
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HUH!!? My brand new heat pump only has 3 wires. You only need the common if you're using 120v out of it also.
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Steve Barker


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If the unit doesnt have a special 20 amp plug that will NOT plug in a standard outlet I would just go ahead and give it a try. the worst that can happen is trip the breaker:)
let it run full speed for at least a half hour although the runner will no doubt tire out before that.....
I bet this unit has a big 20 AMP in red letters to wow the perspective customer intop paying premium bucks:)
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RS wrote:

My curiosity was piqued by the bicjering and the bandwith already used up by this thread, so I pinged the place selling the OP's treadmill, and quickly received a somewhat nebulous answer. I suppose it could be taken as their saying it could be a 15 amp OR a 20 amp circuit?
********************** From: snipped-for-privacy@soletreadmills.com Sent: Thursday, December 07, 2006 12:08 PM To: snipped-for-privacy@conversent.net Subject: Current Draw
Yes, they are designed and engineered to run on 15-20 120v circuits.
Thank you,
Sole Fitness
From: Jeff Wisnia [mailto: snipped-for-privacy@conversent.net] Sent: Thursday, December 07, 2006 9:29 AM To: snipped-for-privacy@soletreadmills.com Subject: Current Draw
Will your F85 run safely off a 15 amp 120 volt circuit?
Thanks,
Jeff ***********************
So, OP, have a go at it with what you've got, you probably don't need new wiring.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Hard to tell if since I'm not there. The common sense approach would seem to be not to rip out the 15 amp circuit, but put in an extra 20 amp circuit, and get three estimates.
Just guessing.....
tom @ www.Ringtone-Makers.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Living in a suburb of Chicago means that building code requires conduit. While a bit more work when finishing the basement, your's is one of those situations in which conduit would be a real money saver. Pulling 12 gauge through existing conduit would take all of five minutes, including coffee breaks.
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$217.65
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