How much a clothes dryer cost to use? Again ......

Page 1 of 5  

Our very conventional old style tumble dryer timer runs for some 45 minutes per load.
With heater cutting in and out (estimating it's on say 80%?).
Heater elements are either 3000 watts or maybe 4500, haven't had this one apart yet, since I got it in exchange for a dozen beer!
Our domestic electricity costs a little over 10 cents per k.watt hr.
So one load of clothes 45/60 x 0.8 a cost of electricity = 0.75 x 0.8 x 0.12 = 7 cents per load.
Occasionally it is necessary to run a 'heavy' load, towels and blankets etc. part of a second run.
So maybe that could be say 12 to 15 cents per load. In summer we hang bedclothes and towels on outside lines.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think your math is wrong. I'll split the difference on the heating element wattage and call it 3750 watts. If you ran it 1 hr that would be 3.75kwh. But, you only run it 45 minutes. so 45/60 x 3.75 = 2.8125kwh And, it's only on 80% of the 45 minutes. So, .8 x 2.8125khw = 2.25kwh Then 10 cents x 2.25 kwh = 22.5 cents Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
amdx wrote:

Sounds right to me. I had done a search not long ago and found the average cost to dry a load of wash was between $0.25 to $0.50 depending on your electricity cost. Ten cents is on the low side and it goes up a little over $0.20 in some areas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try $1.00, past the initial bullshit low-balled "tier" levels. mebbe 10c for the first 10 kw.... heh.
--
EA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Existential Angst wrote:

Maybe for you, but I take my total electric bill for last month (extra low despite the colder than normal weather because I was away for over 1 week and I don't heat the whole house even when I am here), $125.74 divided by the total KWH's used, 1540 and get my real price at $0.082/KWH That is the total including any taxes, surcharges no matter how many KWH I use, there is no tiered pricing. So using the formula above, drying one load of wash would only cost me about $0.182 , yes, less than 19 cents/load.
Maybe YOU fall for the "initial bullshit low-balled "tier" levels", but that doesn't mean everyone does.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Existential Angst wrote:

The tiers here are just the opposite, cost per KWh goes down as usage goes up. Go figure...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pete C. wrote:

If a utility has huge surplus generation capablility, that makes sense. Where are you?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob F wrote:

N. TX.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 27 Jan 2010 09:31:43 -0800, terry wrote:

I think Mike's right - that should be 45/60 x 0.8 x 0.12 x kW:
3kW works out as 0.75 x 0.8 x 0.12 x 3 = $0.22 4kW works out as 0.75 x 0.8 x 0.12 x 4 = $0.29
... ours is on off-peak so gets 6c/kWh, but I can't remember the wattage on the heater for ours either (and it normally runs for about an hour for a full load)
I don't even know where to begin figuring out how much of that heat is being lost into the house (rather than vent outside) and therefore how much useful work it does for the six months of the year we need to be heating the home anyway.

Yes, same here, when we can be bothered. Sometimes we're lazy and just run the dryer anyway :-) Maybe for the summer I should be painting the thing black and running it outdoors ;)
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also, don't forget the draw of drum motor.
As per a previous thread, proly better to divide the electric bill by the total kwhrs, and you will find your kwhr cost is double or triple what the stated rate is. Here in NY it winds up being triple the stated kWhr rate.
So the amount per load in NY could easily be 75c.
You can drastically shorten your drying times/costs with a front loader wash machine. Front loaders are a win-win x 10 situation, drastically reducing the costs/consumption of everything involved in washing: detergent, water, electricity, drying time, wear/tear on clothes (less lint in the dryer), and proly a longer lasting machine due to much simpler mechanisms, drive train. Why they cost so g-d much up front is another story.....
--
EA


>
> I don't even know where to begin figuring out how much of that heat is
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There you go again. As Tony pointed out to you, just because that's how your electric company pricing is structured, it doesn't meant that it's that way everywhere. Here in the next state over, NJ, my residential rate is fixed at a flat rate per KWH.

Most of us here would say the large upfront price differential should be factored in before concluding that front loaders are a win-win situation. And I'd say if you do that and factor in the time value of money, in most cases they come out to be a losing proposition.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There you go again. As Tony pointed out to you, just because that's how your electric company pricing is structured, it doesn't meant that it's that way everywhere. Here in the next state over, NJ, my residential rate is fixed at a flat rate per KWH.

Most of us here would say the large upfront price differential should be factored in before concluding that front loaders are a win-win situation. And I'd say if you do that and factor in the time value of money, in most cases they come out to be a losing proposition. =================================================== Well, if the Frigidaire Josh posted on at $500 is any good, then this would be a no-brainer -- proly a very very high ROI. And, for some, the fact that front loaders are so easy on septic systems is a major plus as well. The resource savings from any front loader are enormous. How that actually translates into an ROI is not so easy to determine, unless the price is "normal". $1500 does make you think a bunch of times.... dats why they give these units such good paint jobs....
--
EA



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yes Mike and Jules, you are correct, my wrong math. It's more like two to four times my original number. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's amazing (to me) that our cost is almost 3x as high. The total cost per kwh (including tax, generation, transmission, fees) is a whopping 17.7 cent/kwh without any possibility of off-peak.
It's hard to believe that the "free market" price (in the absense of governmental regulation) would be 3x as large particularly given that electricity is: - An almost pure commodity (a volt is a volt is a volt) - Transportable (and relatively efficiently too with new power line technology) - Easily buyable/sellable - Mature technology
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
blueman wrote: ...

Where do you think there's an absence of regulation that affects utility pricing regardless of where you are (which w/o knowing either makes specific reasons for rate differences impossible but)...
- there's still voltage drop and line losses - there's very little installed new power line w/ advanced technology that makes much difference as yet (it's coming, and there is some installed, but it's quite insignificant amount in overall scheme as yet) - but not storable so it is used as generated (and therefore required to have the capacity to generate however much is needed to be used at any specific instant) - a great deal of which is "excessively mature" in terms of thermal efficiency owing in large part to regulation that makes replacement such a difficult process (read expensive) that it isn't done as frequently as otherwise would be. Something otoo 65% of generation facilities are 40+ yrs old
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But what it takes for fuel to generate the power is a huge factor and varies widely. The areas with the lowest electric prices are usually the ones driven off hydro-electric. Unfortunately, because of geography, most areas of the country don't have that available.
And also factor in labor rates, materials costs, land costs, etc. What it costs to build a sub-station or run a new transmission line near Niagra falls is going to be a whole lot different than one in northern NJ or San Francisco.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But what it takes for fuel to generate the power is a huge factor and varies widely. The areas with the lowest electric prices are usually the ones driven off hydro-electric. Unfortunately, because of geography, most areas of the country don't have that available.
And also factor in labor rates, materials costs, land costs, etc. What it costs to build a sub-station or run a new transmission line near Niagra falls is going to be a whole lot different than one in northern NJ or San Francisco.
===================================== A much much bigger factor: How corrupt is a state's legislature? Given the corruption factor in NY, I spose 30c/kWhr (what it winds up really being, not the bullshit 9c) is still a bargain.
--
EA





> - Transportable (and relatively efficiently too with new power line
> technology)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Please post us a link to the utility in NY where electricity costs 30C a kwh for any typical amount of residential usage. I've seen many tables showing electricity costs, highs, lows, etc and have never seen anywhere that it costs 30c.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

-snip-
30cents wouldn't surprise me for ConEd, LIPA or Central Hudson. The average is supposedly 19cents; http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/epm/table5_6_a.html
I'm served by National Grid- one of the bigger upstate suppliers- and usually on the low end. They have on the bill that they are selling me electricity for 6.8cents. But when I divide the bill by the KWH, I find I'm paying over 15cents. LIPA and ConEd both advertise over 20 cents & they both have higher taxes than upstate- so 30cents is real easy to believe.
But I think California and Hawaii are higher.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

It also all depends on what particular rate is being spoken of -- depending on locale and what particular rules are for the various state/local commissions, there's generally an approved "base rate" but when the fuel adjustment and so on are included the actual end-user cost is generally higher (sometimes significantly so). It can even vary within the state from utility to utility based on specifics of a generation mix, construction costs for needed expansion or to meet mandated generation mix requirements, or pollution abatement edicts, etc., etc., etc., ... IOW, despite wishes to the contrary there still is no free lunch.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.