How does gasoline go "bad"? When?

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TEL, MMT, and even MTBE were/are added at the refinery before the fuel was sent to the distribution centers. There was no special handling needed at the DCs.
Alcohol, on the other hand, is added to the gas at the DC /while the truck is being loaded immediately prior to its daily deliveries to retail outlets/. It is necessary to do this on account of the high corrosiveness of alcohol, and on account of the tendency of alcoholized fuels to spoil quickly. This special handling is expensive and troublesome for distributors, and was/is one of the objections to oxygenated fuels.
At the level of the individual home user, year-old oxygenated gas would be just fine, since any trouble you may experience would involve you alone. Refiners, distributors, and retailers cannot afford the risk, considering their high volume and their exposure to liability.
--
Tegger

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Storing gas without stabilizer in a fuel can or other approved container is not the same as leaving the fuel tank of your mower or other gasoline powered equipment. (2 stroke engines are especially sensitive) When gas is not drained from carbs and fuel system gums and deposits can block small orifices and fuel passages and prevent the engine from starting or running properly. If the engine fuel system & carb is drained, and then filled using a can of year old gasoline, it will probably run OK, (may be slight performance loss with older fuel) OTOH if the same gas is left in the equipment's fuel tank and fuel system for a year, there very well may be starting or running problems.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but not simpler. (Albert Einstein)

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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So, start up the lawn-mower for a minute or so mid winter?
David
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I always used old gasoline, in my pick-up truck, adding it little by little to new gasoline.
i
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So, how to get the old stuff out of a lawn-mower's carb, etc, at the end of the summer?
(Without taking it apart, that is.)
David
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On Sun, 16 Dec 2012 01:19:01 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

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I don't bother, I just pour a tot of fuel stabilizer in the tank and go out and mow the lawn for one last time, so the stabilized fuel is throughout. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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This is about #2 fuel oil, not gasoline, so I dunno if it's relevant or not.
Years ago I had a job pulling underground fuel tanks to meet the new standards (double walled, corrosion protected, leak detection, etc.)
Some of these were back up fuel for natural gas boilers, and so 10,000 gallons of fuel oil had been sitting for ten years or so. When we pumped that oil, most of it was good. Some had a bit of water especially if the tanks leaked.
A year or two later I had to pull one of the new tanks, I forget why; maybe the building was demolished or something. There was almost a foot of gooey sludge at the bottom, kind of like a soft jello. Our environmental section said it was probably biological growth, that the refinery process had changed and oil was subject to this much faster.
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