How do you "tune up" a hard-to-start Craftsman 18" chainsaw

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This was the problem with British cars. Every car was a Friday afternoon car.
--
Clive


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On Mon, 23 Aug 2010 18:51:43 +0100, Clive wrote:

Nah! The cars were cool!
Blame it on Lucas, the Prince of Darkness.
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2010 21:54:15 +0000, Hachiroku ハチロク wrote:

I've owned a few 70's British cars over the years and to be honest never had much problem with Lucas - no worse than electrics in other cars. Moisture seems to be the main killer, not quality issues with the parts themselves.
cheers
Jules
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I agree. I've owned a few Limey cars and lotsa Brit bikes. I know the older bikes blew bulbs cuz of the bizarre fluctuations of their weird zenier diode based electrical system, but no more than the sealed head lamps of my body-numbing vibrator HD Sportster. I never had a prob with Lucas lights/electrics on any of the cars I had.
I think that whole myth is jes something perpetuated by dolts with no experience with Lucas and who just like saying the phrase.
"Du-uh... Lucas, prince of darkness. heh heh...." [drool]
nb
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On Tue, 24 Aug 2010 15:39:51 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

You must be the only one. A friend basically had to redesign the entire electrical system himself. The Lucas didn't like the Tucson heat at all. He had to hike home more than once.
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Lucas made some good parts and they also made some junk. MG decided to use the junk.
Whoever the hell it was that decided running 25A into the dashboard switch to avoid using a headlight relay... that was an MG employee, not a Lucas one.
Yes, a complete electrical redesign is in order on these cars, but I don't think Lucas is really to blame for the horrors that MG perpetrated. --scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

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That explains a lot. I only had Austin Healeys and Triumphs. Never had any problems with Lucas on either of them. Don't recall ever changing a light bulb, front or back. Some of the tail light lens designs sucked donkey dick. Those stupid out-there tail light lenses on the Spitefire were always getting whacked by cars, bicycles, baby strollers, stray cats, gentle summer breezes.... ;)
nb
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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 13:27:30 GMT, notbob wrote:

As an update, I stopped by a small engine shop and the mechanic, an old school buddy whom I trust, said they make a special tool to adjust the Low and High carbeurator 'pins'.
He didn't have it for the Craftsman (he worked only on Husqvarna) but he said they exist for each brand.
Does anyone know where to get the California adjustment tool for the Poulan? I called Poulan customer support 866-802-6383 but all they said was that it's illegal for an owner to adjust his carbeurator in California.
So, do you know where I can get those adjustment tools for the Poulan carb screws?
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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 09:03:13 -0700, SF Man wrote:

I called another number, 1.800.554.6723 and Poulan customer support said it's illegal for them to sell a California carbeurator adjustment tool (P/N 530035560) to the public, but, (here's the catch), I can go to any authorized dealer and they CAN sell the California carbeurator adjustment tool to me.
Laws are weird.
Poulan customer service gave me a list of dealers but once I realized I can get the Poulan carburetor adjustment tool, I simply googled for "Poulan 530035560 Splined Carburetor Adjustment Tool" and will buy it off the web if I can't get it locally at the Poulan authorized dealers.
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On Wed, 25 Aug 2010 09:18:02 -0700, SF Man wrote:

I'm curious. Is a "spline" what those California carburator adjustment "pins" are?
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I'm wondering if this isn't a small Torx tool. With them calling it a spline.
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No, it is not torx. They make a couple different sizes of these splined tools. They are like a nut driver, but splined. I have one. It is an absolute necessity when adjusting carbs.
Hank
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How many teeth to the spline...could you use a torx deck screw and make one? ;)
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I never tried, but I doubt it because teh splines are so fine and small.
Hank
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On Thu, 26 Aug 2010 12:42:18 -0700 (PDT), Hank wrote:

I have to agree. The tool is inexpensive (shipping costs more than the tool). It hasn't arrived yet so I can't tell you more.
On the pins, the "splines", if they're there at all, must be so tiny I can't see them. You can't actually touch the screw because it's recessed and they put a plastic housing around it expressly so you could not get pliars around it. They really look like pins more than screws.
The only thing you can get on them is some socket-like thing (which I'm hoping the spline tool is).
Does anyone have a PICTURE of the splines close up so we can see what we're dealing with?
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wrote:

Count the splines on the outside of the screw head.
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I think you'll have to pry off the plastic stops that are on them first.
On most of the small 2 cycle engines that I work on, I replace the fuel lines and make sure the filter is attached. This fixes the majority that have a air/fuel mixture problem. Those little hoses don't last too long and create a host of problems that mimic a dirty carb.
Hank
Hank
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On Thu, 26 Aug 2010 14:35:35 -0700 (PDT), Hank wrote:

They do not appear to have any plastic stops.
They are rounded 'pins', ostensibly with splines, surrounded by a larger plastic 'protector' (like the kind vending machines have) to prevent you from accessing them from the sides.
I've seen the pictures of the large plastic caps on other chain saws but these are simply metal pins, recessed about an inch in, so that the ONLY access is a thin tool that surrounds the (presumably splined) shaft.
The splines, if they are there, are soooo tiny, my poor eyes can't see them. That's why I didn't realize they were adjustable at first.
Still waiting for the tool to arrive.
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wrote:

Me too!
Hang in, you're almost there.
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Bah humbug. Throw it away and get a new chainsaw that uses electricity instead.
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